NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
3:31 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

How Do Israeli And Palestinian Textbooks Treat The Other Side?

Palestinian students attend a class in the West Bank city of Ramallah on Sunday.
Majdi Mohammed AP

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 6:48 am

There was some good news and bad news in a three-year study that tried to take an objective look at bias in Israeli and Palestinian textbooks directed against "the other."

Read more
Music Reviews
2:46 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Is Fleetwood Mac's Expanded 'Rumours' A Bit Much?

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:29 am

An expanded version of Fleetwood Mac's 1977 album Rumours comes out this week, to mark the 35th anniversary of one of the top-selling albums of the '70s. The deluxe set includes demos, outtakes from the recording sessions, live recordings and a documentary DVD, along with a vinyl pressing of the original album.

Read more
Music News
2:39 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Remembering Karen Carpenter, 30 Years Later

Karen Carpenter, of The Carpenters, performs in London in 1974.
Tim Graham Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 2:38 pm

Read more
The Two-Way
2:09 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Pentagon Will Brief Congress On Deadly Sept. 14 Camp Bastion Attack

More than four months after a deadly attack at a sprawling allied base in Afghanistan that killed two U.S. Marines, there are lingering questions about how it happened.

Read more
The Salt
1:34 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Grilled Cheese With Mac N' Cheese

The Mac.
NPR

We live in an age of great marriages: William and Kate, Kim and Kanye (oh, wait, she's still married to this guy), Kim and The Next One. Best of all, though, is "The Mac" from Cheesie's, in Chicago. The sandwich weds a classic Grilled Cheese with Mac N' Cheese, in one easy to absorb package.

Ian: I honestly feel like we're five years away from never again having to use the word "or" in America.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:19 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Report: W.Va. Fails To Enforce New Regs Designed To Prevent Mine Explosions

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 6:53 am

Ken Ward at The Charleston Gazette has a story worth reading about West Virginia's failure to enforce new coal mine dust standards prompted by the deadly explosion three years ago at Massey Energy's Upper Big Branch mine.

Ward used the state's Freedom of Information Act to obtain and review mine safety inspections conducted by the Office of Miners' Health, Safety and Training.

Read more
Middle East
1:03 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Iran's Leader Embraces Facebook; Fellow Iranians Are Blocked

Iranian authorities are using cyberpolice units to crack down on people who try to access banned websites, including social media sites such as Facebook. Here, Iranians use computers at an Internet cafe in Tehran in January.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:29 am

When Iran's supreme leader got a Facebook page in December, Iranians sat up and blinked.

Some thought it was a fake, finding it hard to believe that Ayatollah Ali Khamenei would be using a technology that his own government blocks. A U.S. State Department spokeswoman skeptically wondered how many "likes" it would attract.

But some of Khamenei's supporters quickly rallied behind the move, which first came to light in a reference on β€” you guessed it β€” the ayatollah's Twitter account.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:02 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Royal Recovery: Remains ID'd As Those Of King Richard III

An enlarged image of the skull identified as that of King Richard III. Jo Appleby, a lecturer in human bioarchaeology at the University of Leicester, is pointing to a detail.
Rui Vieira PA Photos /Landov

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 4:10 pm

Remains found under what's now a parking lot in the English city of Leicester have been confirmed to be those of King Richard III, researchers at the University of Leicester announced Monday.

Read more
It's All Politics
12:42 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Romney 2013? Tagg Weighs Massachusetts Senate Bid

Republican Tagg Romney reportedly is considering a bid for the U.S. Senate from Massachusetts in the June 25 special election.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:58 pm

The Boston Herald caused a bit of a stir Monday, reporting that Mitt Romney's eldest son, Tagg, is considering a bid for the Massachusetts Senate seat long held by new Secretary of State John Kerry.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:41 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Reports: U.S. Plans To Sue S&P Over Mortgage Bonds Ratings

A sign for Standard & Poor's rating agency stands in front of the company headquarters in New York.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 1:01 pm

The United States and some states are planning to sue Standard & Poor's Ratings Services over what they say were the faulty ratings of mortgage bonds leading up to the 2008 financial collapse.

The Wall Street Journal broke the news citing "people familiar with the matter," and The New York York Times is pinning its reporting on S&P, which tells the newspaper it is expecting a lawsuit.

Read more
Health
12:14 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

The Unexpected Side Effects Of Chemotherapy

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 1:13 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee, in Washington. Neal Conan is away. Chemotherapy can be a painful and disruptive experience that can affect almost every aspect of a cancer patient's life. We hear most often about things like nausea and hair loss, of course, but people aren't necessarily prepared to lose, say, the taste of their favorite food, or develop insomnia.

Read more
Digital Life
12:10 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

When Private Actions Go Very Public

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 12:33 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee.

Read more
Shots - Health News
12:08 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Scientists Find A Way To Scare Patients Who Can't Feel Fear

Movies like The Shining frighten most of us, but some brain-damaged people feel no fear when they watch a scary film. However, an unseen threat β€” air with a high level of carbon dioxide β€” produces a surprising result.
Warner Bros. Photofest

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 8:39 am

In shorthand often used to describe the brain, fear is controlled by a small, almond-shaped structure called the amygdala.

But it's not quite that simple, as a study published Sunday in Nature Neuroscience demonstrates.

Read more
Remembrances
12:01 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Remembering Rosa Parks On Her 100th Birthday

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:43 pm

Civil rights activist Rosa Parks would have been 100 years old today. NPR's Celeste Headlee talks with listeners about the first time they learned about Parks and what she signifies today.

The Two-Way
11:45 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Ahmadinejad Volunteers To Become First Iranian In Space

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
Behrouz Mehri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 3:42 pm

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad says he's ready to become the first Iranian in space.

Britain's Independent reports:

"'I am ready to be the first human to be sent to space by Iranian scientists,' Ahmadinejad said on the sidelines of an exhibition of space achievements in Tehran, according to the Mehr news agency.

Read more
Author Interviews
11:44 am
Mon February 4, 2013

A Barbados Family Tree With 'Sugar In The Blood'

SPrada iStockphoto.com

In her new book, Sugar in the Blood, Andrea Stuart weaves her family story around the history of slavery and sugar in Barbados. Stuart's great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandfather landed on the island in the 1630s. He had been a blacksmith in England, but became a sugar planter in Barbados, at a time when demand for the crop was exploding worldwide. Stuart is descended from a slave owner who, several generations after the family landed in Barbados, had relations with an unknown slave.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:41 am
Mon February 4, 2013

'Meaningful' Ads Stood Out As Super Bowl Favorites

Budweiser's Super Bowl spot won top favorite among many.
Budweiser YouTube

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 2:55 pm

The Super Bowl XLVII TV ads told viewers they love animals, laughs and America.

Read more
The Salt
11:15 am
Mon February 4, 2013

'God Made A Farmer' And The Super Bowl Made Him A Star

A still from the Super Bowl ad, "God Made a Farmer"
Youtube

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 4:14 pm

Read more
National Security
10:56 am
Mon February 4, 2013

The CIA And The Hazards Of Middle East Forecasting

Egyptian President Anwar Sadat is flanked by senior military officers as he reviews maps of battlefield developments in the 1973 Arab-Israeli War. He's shown at army headquarters in Cairo on Oct. 15, 1973. Egypt and Syria attacked Israel, catching Israel and the CIA off-guard.
AP

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 6:48 am

Government agencies do not often acknowledge their own errors, but the CIA has done just that with the declassification of intelligence memoranda on the 1973 Arab-Israeli War.

The documents show that agency analysts, down to the last minute before the outbreak of fighting, were assuring President Nixon, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and other policymakers that Egypt and Syria were unlikely to attack Israel.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:53 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Canada Bids Its Penny Goodbye; Should The U.S.?

Canadian pennies. They're not going to be put into circulation anymore.
Fred Greenslade Reuters /Landov

Canada is changing its change.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:33 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Europol Uncovers Match-Fixing Scheme, Questions 'Integrity' Of Football In Europe

The European Union police organization, Europol, uncovered a massive match-fixing scheme that they say presents "a big problem for the integrity of football in Europe."

As the AP reports, the Europol investigation found "more than 380 suspicious matches β€” including World Cup and European Championship qualifiers and two Champions League games β€” and found evidence that a Singapore-based crime group is closely involved in match-fixing."

Read more
Planet Money
10:12 am
Mon February 4, 2013

A Union Vote For Chinese Workers Who Assemble iPhones

Workers at a Foxconn plant in Shenzhen, China, in 2010.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

The Chinese workers who assemble iPhones, iPads and tons of other electronic devices may soon be able to elect their own union representatives, the FT reports.

Labor unions technically do exist in Chinese factories, but they're typically controlled by management and the government. So a union run by democratic vote of the workers would be a huge shift.

Read more
Education
10:03 am
Mon February 4, 2013

African Americans Fly High With Math And Science

Barrington Irving , a 23-year-old Jamaican-born pilot, at a news conference at Opa-locka Airport Wednesday, June 27, 2007, ending a three-month journey he said would make him the youngest person to fly around the world alone.
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:48 am

This Black History Month, Tell Me More is taking a look at African Americans in the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and math) who are inspiring future generations.

Today, Barrington Irving shares how his sky high dreams became a reality. A chance encounter in his parents' bookstore put him on a path that would make him the youngest person and first African American to fly solo around the world.

Read more
Music Reviews
10:02 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Yo La Tengo: Decades In And Far From Fading

Yo La Tengo's new album is titled Fade.
Carlie Armstron Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 11:19 am

Yo La Tengo wouldn't seem to be very rock 'n' roll, given that it's a very stable and long-lasting operation. Since 1991, the lineup has consisted of a married couple β€” drummer Georgia Hubley and guitarist Ira Kaplan, along with bassist James McNew β€” and all three play additional instruments as needed. Yo La Tengo has been with the same label, Matador, since 1993. But if the band lacks rock dramatics, I would argue that it knows as much about the modes and manners of rock 'n' roll as anyone who has ever played the music.

Read more
The Salt
10:00 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Small Farmers Aren't Cashing In With Wal-Mart

Wal-Mart claims that 11 percent of the produce in its stores now comes from local farms.
Abbie Fentress Swanson Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 6:21 am

When Wal-Mart calls, Herman Farris always finds whatever the retailer wants, even if it's yucca root in the dead of winter. Farris is a produce broker in Columbia, Mo., who has been buying for Wal-Mart from auctions and farms since the company began carrying fruits and vegetables in the early 1990s.

During the summer and fall, nearly everything Farris delivers is grown in Missouri. That's Wal-Mart's definition of "local" β€” produce grown and sold in the same state. In winter, it's a bit tougher to source locally.

Read more
Television
9:51 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Super Bowl Ads: Winners And Losers

Some people enjoy the Super Bowl commercials more than the football game. Host Michel Martin and Tampa Bay Times media critic Eric Deggans run through the best and worst ads; from senior citizens making late night trips to Taco Bell to nerds getting really sloppy kisses.

Politics
9:51 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Political Chat: Gun Control And The Senate

The debate over gun control continues to dominate the headlines. Meanwhile, the U.S. Senate doubles the number of African-American members by welcoming William 'Mo" Cowan. He replaces John Kerry. Host Michel Martin talks politics with Republican strategist Ron Christie and Keli Goff, political correspondent for The Root.

The Two-Way
9:16 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Reports: 'American Sniper' Chris Kyle Died While Trying To Help Fellow Veteran

Chris Kyle, retired Navy SEAL and bestselling author of the book American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History, in April 2012. He was killed Saturday.
Paul Moseley/Fort Worth Star-Telegram MCT /Landov

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:56 am

More is being learned today about former Navy SEAL Chris Kyle and the man accused of killing the decorated Iraq War veteran.

Read more
Europe
8:45 am
Mon February 4, 2013

For Greeks, Painful Cuts Keep Tearing At The Social Fabric

Georgia Kolia, 63, has two adult children, both unemployed. She works as a volunteer distributing loaves of bread at the Agia Zonis Orthodox church soup kitchen for the poor in Athens, Greece, in April 2012.
John Kolesidis Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 4:12 pm

Greeks are feeling the squeeze. The social repercussions of three years of austerity measures imposed by international lenders are hitting hard. Thousands of businesses have shut down, unemployment is nearly 27 percent and rising, and the once dependable safety net of welfare benefits is being pulled in.

With further cutbacks and tax hikes about to kick in, Greece's social fabric is being torn apart.

Nowhere are cutbacks more visible and painful than in health care.

Read more
Shots - Health News
8:37 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Experimental Tuberculosis Vaccine Fails To Protect Infants

Nurse Christel Petersen inoculates a child in the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative study in 2011.
Rodger Bosch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 4:03 pm

Researchers are disappointed in the results of a long-awaited study of the leading candidate vaccine against tuberculosis, one of humankind's most elusive scourges.

But, pointing to more than a dozen other TB vaccines in the pipeline, they say they're not discouraged.

Read more

Pages