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It's All Politics
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Documentaries Help Amplify Conservative Voice

Phelim McAleer directed the film FrackNation, one of more than 20 documentaries screened at this year's CPAC.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 12:11 pm

A decade ago, there were only one or two documentary films screening at CPAC, the annual meeting of conservative activists. This year, there were more than 20.

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National Security
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Female Soldiers Face Tough Switch From Front Lines To Homefront

Sgt. Jaclyn O'Shea (second from left) and Sgt. Alyssa Corcoran (right) stand with Afghan commandos in Logar province, Afghanistan.
Courtesy of Jaclyn O'Shea

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 8:36 am

In a series of reports this week, NPR's Quil Lawrence looks at some of the most pressing challenges facing America's nearly 2 million female veterans. Like men, they often need assistance in finding jobs, dealing with PTSD and reintegrating into their families. And all too often, women say their military experience included sexual harassment or sexual assault.

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History
3:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Sifting Through The World Of Locks, And Those Who Pick Them

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:32 am

Is there such a thing as a lock than cannot be picked? Host Rachel Martin talks with Tom Vanderbilt of Slate about the quest.

Sunday Puzzle
1:29 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Take Your Pics

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:32 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name in which the first word starts with the letters P-I and the second word starts with C. For example, given "One of 27 compositions by Mozart" you would say "(Pi)ano (C)oncerto."

Last week's challenge: Think of two familiar three-word sayings in which all three words are the same length. The middle word in both sayings is the same. In each saying, the first and last words rhyme with each other. What two sayings are these?

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Iraq
3:56 pm
Sat March 16, 2013

The Iraq War: 10 Years Later, Where Do We Stand?

Traffic drives through Tahrir Square in central Baghdad on Wednesday. Ten years after the start of the war, bullet holes still mark buildings, and towers wrecked by U.S. missiles and tank shells have not been fully rebuilt.
Hadi Mizban AP

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 8:32 am

Ten years ago this Tuesday, the U.S. invaded Iraq, and by any count — and there have been many — the toll has been devastating.

So far, about 4,400 U.S. troops and more than 100,000 Iraqi civilians have been killed, and the combined costs of the war come to an astounding $2 trillion, including future commitments like veteran care.

So where do we stand today?

Stephen Hadley was the national security adviser under President George W. Bush from 2005 to 2009, and part of the White House team that helped sell the war to the public.

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NPR Story
2:49 pm
Sat March 16, 2013

Annual Conservative Gathering Questions GOP's Direction

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 8:32 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

If you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Jacki Lyden.

As we just heard, longtime Republican Senator Rob Portman's position on gay marriage has evolved. Of course, gay marriage is one of the social issues that was front and center at this week's Conservative Political Action Conference, otherwise known as CPAC. It's the annual gathering of the most conservative wing of the Republican Party.

NPR's national political correspondent Don Gonyea has been at CPAC, and he joins me now. Hi there, Don.

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Music Interviews
2:31 pm
Sat March 16, 2013

Kacey Musgraves, Country Music's New 'Golden' Girl

Kacey Musgraves' new album is titled Same Trailer Different Park.
Kelly Christine Musgraves Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 8:32 am

"I'm all about small towns," Kacey Musgraves says. "I think it's a great place to grow up. But I think it might be a little more comforting to some people to hear it from a real perspective, instead of one that tries to sweep things under the rug."

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Sports
2:16 pm
Sat March 16, 2013

From Tweeting To Meeting Lance Armstrong

Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong invited sportswriter Michael McCann to his Texas home for a three-hour interview.
Nathalie Magniez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 8:34 am

Writer Michael McCann is a legal analyst for Sports Illustrated. He's been covering Lance Armstrong's legal issues for the past year, following the allegations that Armstrong doped and used performance-enhancing drugs.

McCann regularly responds to readers' questions on Twitter, too. About a month ago, he tells All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden, he had a new follower: @LanceArmstrong. It was the former cycling champion himself.

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The Two-Way
9:54 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Tourist Reportedly Gang-Raped In India

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 5:54 am

A Swiss woman cycling with her husband in India was allegedly beaten and gang-raped, police say. It's the latest high-profile sexual assault in a nation that's facing intense pressure to increase its protections for women.

The couple was on a cycling tour from Mumbai to New Delhi when they were attacked Friday night. The New York Times continues the story:

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Fresh Air Weekend
7:03 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: Adrian Younge, 'Frankenstein's Cat' And Tegan And Sara

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 8:30 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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The Two-Way
3:43 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Now A Politician, Aung San Suu Kyi Is The Object Of Protesters

Aung San Suu Kyi (right) faced protesters when she traveled to a village in northern Myanmar on Thursday to discuss a Chinese-backed copper mine project. Suu Kyi, a Nobel laureate and a member of Parliament, urged protesters to support the project, which was the scene of a violent crackdown last year. She said opposing the project would risk hurting the country's economy.
Soe Than Win AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 11:51 am

Last year, Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi was greeted by adoring crowds during triumphant tours of Asia, the U.S. and Europe. She eclipsed President Thein Sein, who remained in Burma, as the country is also known, and managed a series of domestic crises.

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It's All Politics
3:41 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Rand Paul Wins Conservative Vote In Straw Poll

Members of the college group Young Americans for Freedom roll up Ronald Reagan posters to hand out at CPAC in National Harbor, Md. on Friday.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:39 pm

Conservative activists chose Tea Party favorite Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky as their pick to be the Republican presidential nominee in 2016, at the Conservative Political Action Conference outside Washington, D.C., on Saturday.

As The Associated Press notes, "the win offers little more than bragging rights for Paul, who is popular with the younger generation of libertarian-minded conservatives who packed the conference."

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Politics
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Talk Of Zombies Aside, Gun Bills Face Political Reality

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy holds a hearing on gun control on March 7. The committee has since passed two bills on guns that are headed to the full Senate.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 11:52 am

Two more gun control bills are heading to the Senate floor after narrowly winning approval from the Senate Judiciary Committee this week.

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It's All Politics
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Ted Cruz: From Texas Underdog To Republican Up-And-Comer

Texas Republican Ted Cruz, then senator-elect, speaks to reporters before a freshman senators luncheon on Nov. 13.
Harry Hamburg AP

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:48 am

The keynote speaker at Saturday night's closing session of the Conservative Political Action Conference is a 42-year-old Texan who's been a U.S. senator since January.

In that short time, Tea Party Republican Ted Cruz has already made a mark — and in doing so, he's simply ignored a tradition of new senators being seen, not heard. Cruz's sharp elbows have some colleagues wincing and others hoping he'll run for president.

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The Salt
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Wine Revolution: As Drinkers And Growers, U.S. Declares Independence

The vineyard at Round Pond Estate in Rutherford, Calif. Napa Valley is just one of wine-growing regions across the country.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 10:46 am

A curious shift has happened in global wine-drinking trends: Americans have overtaken the French and Italians, Europe's traditional lovers of the fruits of the vine, as the world's top wine market.

And it's not just wine drinking that's taken off stateside: U.S. wine production is also on the rise.

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Iraq
3:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Letters To My Dead Father

Guffran, 16, sits on the floor of her home, holding a letter she wrote to her father. A Shiite Muslim, Guffran's father was gunned down on the streets of Baghdad in 2006.
Kelly McEvers NPR

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 5:46 am

Ten years after the U.S. invaded Iraq, NPR is taking a look back, revisiting people and places first encountered during the war. In 2006, NPR aired a story about a 9-year-old girl who loved her father so much, she wrote him letters to take to work with him. Even after he died, in a carjacking that appeared to have a sectarian motive, she still wrote to him.

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The Two-Way
4:55 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

North Dakota Legislature OKs Bill Banning Abortions After Heartbeat Is Found

Rep. Bette Grande, R-Fargo, talks to reporters at the state Capitol in Bismarck, N.D. on Friday.
James MacPherson AP

A week after the Arkansas legislature passed the strictest measure in the country on abortion, North Dakota's legislature passed a bill that goes further and would ban abortions as soon as a heartbeat is detected.

Arkansas' bill banned abortions after 12 weeks; North Dakota's could ban them as early as six weeks into a pregnancy.

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It's All Politics
4:44 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Romney, Yesterday's Man At CPAC, Gets A Winner's Reception

Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney leaves the stage after speaking Friday at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Maryland's National Harbor.
Alex Wong Getty Images

It was one of the most anticipated moments at this year's large gathering of conservative activists.

What would Mitt Romney say in his first major speech since he lost the presidential election and, even more importantly, how would the crowd treat him?

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Shots - Health News
4:42 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Is Your Medicine Vegan? Probably Not

Heparin is an anticoagulant and the prescription version is made from pig, raising concerns for vegans.
Rob Kim Landov

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 7:25 pm

Go looking for animal products, and apparently you will find them everywhere.

That's the takeaway from the book Veganissimo A to Z, recently translated into English for the first time. What's veganissimo? It's veganism of the highest order, according to the German authors Reuben Proctor and Lars Thomsen, who call themselves "professional vegans." (Is veganism a healthful way to eat? Sorry, we're not going there in this post.)

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All Tech Considered
4:27 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

'Keep Google Reader Running' Petition Hits 100K; Fans Audition Replacements

Google's announcement this week that it would discontinue its Reader after the end of June has left loyal users angry — and scrambling for replacements.
NPR

Google's announcement this week that it will kill its Reader product on July 1 prompted moans of despair from those who rely on the free RSS service to monitor headlines. To illustrate the level of dependency they've come to feel, some are comparing the move to Google abandoning search.

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The Two-Way
3:57 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Federal Judge Rules The FBI's Secret Demands Of Data Are Unconstitutional

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, right, and FBI Director Robert Mueller.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 4:29 pm

A federal judge in California ruled today that the FBI cannot secretly demand data from banks and phone companies in national security cases. The judge said orders that keep those requests secret violate the First Amendment.

NPR's Carrie Johnson filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The demands known as 'national security letters' became a quick and popular tool for the FBI to gather information without a judge's pre-approval in the years after the September 11, 2001 attacks.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
3:41 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Who's Carl This Time?

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 8:29 am

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell, and here's your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Aww. Thanks, Carl. Thanks everybody. We got a great show for you today. We got Huey Lewis of Huey Lewis and the News. He'll be joining us later to play our game. But first, before we get started, Carl, let me say it is great to have you back.

KASELL: Thank you, Peter, good to be back.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
3:41 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Panel Round Two

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 8:29 am

More questions for the panel: Speaking In Tongues, The Curse of Lipitor's Tomb, and Broad Appeal.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
3:41 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Limericks

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 8:29 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Coming up, it's Lightning Fill in the Blank, but first it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-Wait-Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924. You can always click the contact us link on our website waitwait.npr.org.

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Book Reviews
3:39 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Book Review: 'Where Tigers Are At Home'

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 11:05 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Our book reviewer, Alan Cheuse, has just traveled to Brazil and back in an 800-page novel. The book is called "Where Tigers Are At Home." It's by a French novelist named Jean-Marie Blas de Robles and it's just out in English. Here's Alan's review.

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The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

The Man Who Coined 'The God Particle' Explains: It Was A Joke!

This is what researchers at the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider expect a Higgs boson to look like. The Higgs boson is the subatomic particle that scientists say gives everything in the universe mass.
ATLAS Experiment/CERN

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 4:02 pm

We've explained it many times: Physicists are irked when we in the media call the Higgs Boson, "The God Particle."

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Music News
3:06 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

The 'Singing Sound' Of Saxophonist Charles Lloyd

Charles Lloyd, 75, continues to tour widely.
Dorothy Darr ECM Records

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 6:31 pm

Charles Lloyd has a way of talking that sounds a lot like the notes from his saxophone: full of youthful energy, yet packed with experiences reserved for grownups.

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It's All Politics
2:59 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Analyst: Portman's Gay Marriage Shift May Be 'Tip Of The Spear' In GOP

Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, speaks at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., on Aug. 29, 2012.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:42 pm

It is a theme that has become increasingly familiar during the rapid evolution of American political attitudes toward same-sex marriage: People who learn that a friend or loved one is gay are far more likely to support same-sex marriage, even if they were once adamantly opposed.

Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, who became the first Republican in the U.S. Senate to openly endorse same-sex marriage, is simply the latest.

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Shots - Health News
2:34 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Matchmaker, Er, Match Week, Make Me A Doctor

Match day at Georgetown University School of Medicine on March 15.
Eric Stern for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 4:16 pm

Match week is the nail-biting time of year that haunts and tantalizes fourth-year medical students with dreams of residency programs. It culminates with the students learning at Friday at 1 p.m. if — and where — a hospital wants to train them to become full-fledged doctors.

Kristin Huntoon, 34, at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine, tells Shots the past few months have been nerve-wracking. The fourth-year medical student would notice herself thinking about residency programs while she was in class, or during clinical rotations.

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Asia
1:36 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

From Police Chief To Political Office, Jobs Are For Sale In China

The 12th National People's Congress holds the election for its new president at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Thursday.
Wang Zhao AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:15 pm

China's new president, Xi Jinping, who was formally elected Thursday, is already engaged in his own anti-corruption campaign, threatening to go after the key players — the tigers as well as the flies.

Confronting the issue is a matter of political self-interest and survival for China's new leaders. The problem is how to root out corrupt officials when so many are quite literally invested in the system.

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