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Code Switch
3:51 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

What Does Modern Prejudice Look Like?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:08 am

Harvard psychologist Mahzarin Banaji was once approached by a reporter for an interview. When Banaji heard the name of the magazine the reporter was writing for, she declined the interview: She didn't think much of the magazine and believed it portrayed research in psychology inaccurately.

But then the reporter said something that made her reconsider, Banaji recalled: "She said, 'You know, I used to be a student at Yale when you were there, and even though I didn't take a course with you, I do remember hearing about your work.' "

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Business
3:28 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Airport Delays Raise Questions About Controller Furloughs

Passengers check their flight status at Los Angeles International airport on Monday. The FAA said staffing cuts were causing delays in the Eastern U.S.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Some air travelers faced delays Monday as furloughs of air traffic controllers began taking effect.

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The Two-Way
3:11 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

This One-Way Trip To Mars Is Brought To You By ...

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took this close-up of the red planet Mars when it was just 55 million miles away in 2007.
NASA UPI/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 3:59 am

In New York on Monday, a group of scientists and entrepreneurs launched a quixotic program that could allow you (yes you!) to make a trip to Mars. But you can't come back.

The Mars One nonprofit organization announced that it is now open to applicants interested in making a commercially sponsored one-way mission to Mars.

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Movie Interviews
2:40 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Redford: An Entertainer Who Looks To Inform

Robert Redford directs and stars as Jim Grant in The Company You Keep, a film about retired radicals living out nervous lives in hiding.
Doane Gregory Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 7:52 pm

Robert Redford's new movie, The Company You Keep, draws on a turbulent time in recent history: Forty years ago, there was a violent faction of SDS, the Students for a Democratic Society, that was known as the Weather Underground. It turned from organizing marches and sit-ins against the war in Vietnam to planting bombs — and in one case robbing a bank truck and killing a guard.

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Music Reviews
2:38 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Dawes' Story Gets A Fine New Chapter

Dawes' new album is titled Stories Don't End.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 8:14 pm

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The Changing Lives Of Women
2:29 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Moving Out And Buying In: Single Ladies Emerge As Homeowners

First-time homeowner Amanda Cowley in her new home in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Washington, D.C. After married couples, single women are the largest demographic group of homebuyers.
Gabriella Demczuk NPR

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 8:38 am

It's hard to remember that just a few decades ago it was difficult, if not impossible, for a woman alone to take out a mortgage. Federal legislation changed that.

And yet, it's still surprising to learn how dominant single women have become in the housing market today: Their share is second only to married couples, and twice that of single men.

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The Two-Way
2:14 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Arraignment Of Boston Bombing Suspect Start Of Long Legal Path

The arraignment of Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev by federal prosecutors in his hospital room is just the beginning of a long and complicated legal path.

As NPR's Carrie Johnson reports, under the charge of using weapons of mass destruction, which is the core of Monday's indictment against Tsarnaev, he is eligible for the death penalty.

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The Two-Way
2:11 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Canada Charges Two In Plot To Attack Train Line With Al-Qaida's Help

Canadian authorities have disrupted an alleged plot that targeted a passenger train line running between New York and Toronto, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police announced Monday. The plan involved derailing a train, but police officials would give few details about the plot at a news conference this afternoon.

But they did say they believe the suspects received support or help from al-Qaida.

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The Two-Way
2:03 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

FBI: No Ricin Found At Mississippi Suspect's Home, Car

A screen image from a video on the YouTube channel where Paul Kevin Curtis has posted clips of his performances — in this case, as "Elvis."
YouTube.com

During a court hearing today, FBI investigators said they found no traces of ricin at the home or car of a Mississippi man suspected of sending letters laced with the poison to two public officials and President Obama.

The AP reports:

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Shots - Health News
1:27 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

The Warts That Bind Your Family And Friends

Warts: Easy to get and hard to get rid of.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 2:30 pm

There's lots of advice on the Internet about how to avoid warts, those unsightly gray lumps that speckle hands and feet, and are especially common in children.

Wash your hands. Wear flip-flops at the pool. Cover warts with bandages while swimming.

But nowhere do they say avoid your family and friends.

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Africa
12:58 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

South Sudan: A Warn-Torn Nation Transforms To Tourist Destination

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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The Opinion Page
12:54 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Big Op-Ed: Shifting Opinions On Surveillance Cameras

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. And now it's time for the Opinion Page. Investigators in the Boston Marathon bombings used all kinds of images to identify the suspects in Boston: pictures from cell phones, portable video recorders and from TV. But the most useful came from surveillance cameras placed to monitor public places like the entrance to the Lord and Taylor department store and Forum Restaurant.

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The Two-Way
12:26 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Worst First Day Ever? TV Anchor Fired After Profane Debut

A.J. Clemente.
YouTube

I'm sure many of us have had pretty bad first days — at school, at a new job, a bad first date. But this weekend, we got word of a case that may take the cake.

A.J. Clemente was making his debut as weekend anchor for KFYR in Bismarck, N.D.

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Health
12:18 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Learning To Live As An Amputee

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 1:43 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. Too many of those injured in Boston last Monday lost limbs in the explosion and now face a long and difficult recovery. Because the pressure-cooker bombs were in bags placed on the sidewalk, the shrapnel maimed and shredded many people's legs. Their basic challenge, of course, is to walk again. But the physical, mental and emotional process stretches far beyond those first steps.

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Author Interviews
12:04 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

'Zoobiquity': What Humans Can Learn From Animal Illness

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 9:05 am

Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, a cardiologist at the UCLA Medical Center, coined the term "zoobiquity" to describe the idea of looking to animals and the doctors who care for them to better understand human health. Veterinary medicine had not been on her radar at all until about 10 years ago. That's when she was asked to join the medical advisory board for the Los Angeles Zoo and she began hearing about "congestive heart failure in a gorilla or leukemia in a rhinoceros or breast cancer in a tiger or a lion."

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Planet Money
11:57 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Why Amazon Supports An Online Sales-Tax Bill

Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 1:10 pm

If you:

1. Live in a state that charges sales tax

and

2. Buy something from an online store that does not charge you sales tax,

then you are supposed to:

3. Calculate the sales tax yourself and add it onto your annual state tax bill.

Not surprisingly, as we reported last week, almost no one actually does this.

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It's All Politics
11:33 am
Mon April 22, 2013

'Managing Tragedy': A Defining Moment For Civic Leaders

Mayor Thomas Menino, who is recovering from a broken leg unrelated to the bombing, watches on as President Obama speaks during an interfaith healing service last week following the Boston Marathon blasts.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 1:24 pm

Some people are born to be pastors or therapists, but no one goes into politics expecting to help people with grief.

Yet mayors and governors often find themselves having to cope with tragedy. A tornado. A bombing. The death of a police officer, or a little girl.

It becomes an essential part of the job more often than they might expect. While they're rarely prepared for it, how they respond will define their time in office perhaps more than any other act.

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Latin America
11:03 am
Mon April 22, 2013

In Gritty Sao Paulo, Artists Take To The Streets

A portrait is projected on the walls of a building as part of a project promoting art through re-evaluating urban spaces and buildings in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Nov. 22.
Yasuyoshi Chiba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 7:52 pm

It's lunchtime in the heart of Sao Paulo's financial district. Surrounded by tall buildings of cool glass and steel, men and women in suits and business attire walk back and forth busily in Brazil's largest city.

Standing amid the bustle is Leticia Matos — who is, for want of a better word, a crochet artist. She couldn't look more different from the people around her.

Wearing a short-sleeve shirt and covered in bright, quirky tattoos, Matos is at work, too. About a year ago, she says, she got the idea for her project while knitting and crocheting with her friends.

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Television
11:02 am
Mon April 22, 2013

'Rectify': An Ex-Con Navigates The World Outside

Daniel (Aden Young) finds a supporter in the devout Tawney (Adelaide Clemens) — if not among all of his other neighbors — when he's exonerated after spending more than 19 years in prison for a crime he did't commit.
Sundance Film Channel

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 9:05 am

Rectify, a new drama series from the Sundance Channel, wants to stand out from the pack — and it certainly succeeds at that. It's a six-hour limited series, more along the British model of TV than ours here in the States. If these first six installments catch on enough, the story will continue. If not, that's it.

And Rectify is so unusual a show, with its own deliberate pace and premise and approach, that it may not build enough viewership to keep going. But that doesn't mean it's not a worthwhile show, or a memorable one — because it is.

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Shots - Health News
10:45 am
Mon April 22, 2013

As Injuries Rise, More Calls to Refuse The 'Cinnamon Challenge'

An undated photo provided by Frederick Reed shows Dejah Reed, an Ypsilanti, Mich., teen who was hospitalized for a collapsed lung after trying the cinnamon challenge.
Frederick Reed AP

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 10:16 am

It's hard to stop a fad, even one that sometimes goes bad.

But it's time to end the so-called cinnamon challenge, doctors say.

If you're one of the few who hasn't heard about it already, that's probably a good thing.

The game, if you want to call it that, involves trying to quickly swallow a spoonful of ground cinnamon without the benefit of anything to wash it down. It's practically impossible.

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Movie Reviews
10:03 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Tom Cruise's Latest Headed For 'Oblivion'

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 9:05 am

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

In December, Tom Cruise starred as the title character in the film "Jack Reacher." In "Oblivion," which opened on Friday, he plays another Jack, one of few humans left on an Earth devastated by an alien invasion. "Oblivion" is based on a graphic novel co-written by Joseph Kosinski, who went on to direct the film, and it costars Morgan Freeman and Melissa Leo. Film critic David Edelstein has this review.

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The Two-Way
9:50 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Worst-Case Avoided: Few Airports Link Delays To FAA Furloughs

An American Airlines passenger is helped at the ticket counter at Miami International Airport last week. Many airline industry observers expect delays to strike Monday, the first full day of FAA furloughs.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:26 am

Many airline passengers saw only moderate flight delays stemming from the first full day of furloughs for nearly 15,000 flight controllers and other Federal Aviation Administration workers, as industry analysts' worst fears did not materialize. But the reduced staffing was blamed for some slowdowns, and observers say it also increased the length of unrelated delays.

We'll be keeping an eye on possible delays today, and updating this post with new information.

Update at 6:45 p.m. ET. Delays Build, Tied To Weather And Furloughs:

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World
9:30 am
Mon April 22, 2013

After Boston Bombing, A New Focus On Chechnya

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The ethnic heritage of the Boston bombing suspects, as we just mentioned, is one of the things that officials are now looking at in evaluating the case. The Tsarnaev brothers are ethnically Chechen, although their relatives tell us they never actually lived there. Their parents reportedly fled the Central Asian region in the early 1990s.

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Digital Life
9:30 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Boston Bombing Sparks Firestorm Of Internet Hate

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. The suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings have been identified as ethnic Chechen immigrants. So you might be wondering what, if anything, does that have to do with any alleged behavior that they were participating in. We'll find out more about Chechnya's history and politics, in just a few minutes.

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Mental Health
9:30 am
Mon April 22, 2013

What Drives Some Young Muslim Men To Violence?

It's been a week since the Boston Marathon bombing, and people are still wondering why they happened. Media sources have suggested possible motivations, like the suspects turning to radical Islam. Host Michel Martin gets perspective on how young Muslims are reacting to this case, and how Islamic extremists are spotted. She hears from AbdelRahman Murphy, a youth director at a Tennessee mosque; and Mohamed Elibiary, who works with radicalized Muslim youth.

It's All Politics
9:18 am
Mon April 22, 2013

A Rand Paul White House Path Complicated By Dad's Legacy

Texas Republican Rep. Ron Paul and his son Rand Paul, a Republican senator from Kentucky, on stage at a campaign event in Des Moines, Iowa, in 2011. At the time, the elder Paul was seeking the Republican nomination for president. He's now retired from Congress, and the younger Paul says he's "considering" his own 2016 bid.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 4:11 pm

Freshman Sen. Rand Paul insists that he won't decide until next year whether a 2016 presidential run is in his future.

But comments the Kentucky Tea Party Republican made this week at a newsmaker breakfast about a run — "we're considering it" — as well as upcoming speaking engagements in early caucus and primary states Iowa and New Hampshire suggest serious consideration.

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The Two-Way
9:09 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Rescuers Struggling To Reach Areas Of China Hit By Quake

As rocks and dirt tumble down a mountainside (at left), a police officer urges people to stay back on a road in Baoxing county, Sichuan province, on Monday. Rescuers are having a hard time getting to victims of Saturday's strong earthquake because of aftershocks and landslides.
CHINA DAILY Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 11:47 am

Reaching the victims of Saturday's strong earthquake in China's Sichuan province remains difficult because of aftershocks and landslides.

According to Voice of America:

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Remembrances
9:08 am
Mon April 22, 2013

'Mixed Up Files' Author E.L. Konigsburg Dies At 83

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:22 am

From The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler introduced us to a spunky kid who, bored with the Connecticut suburbs, runs away to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Konigsburg wrote more than 20 other books for children and won two Newbery medals. She died Friday at the age of 83.

The Two-Way
8:19 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Sales Of Existing Homes Slip As Inventories Tighten

A sale-pending sign is posted in front of a home last month in San Anselmo, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 11:42 am

There was a 0.6 percent dip in sales of existing homes in March from February, the National Association of Realtors reports, because the supply of homes for sale has tightened as the number of would-be buyers rises.

Its data suggest that sales ran at a 4.92 million annual rate last month, falling from a "downwardly revised" pace of 4.95 million the month before.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
8:18 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Boston's Lockdown A Rare Aspect Of Bombing Investigation

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

One of the most startling aspects of Friday's bombing investigation was the shutdown of most of a major metropolitan area. That's rarely, if ever, happened in quite this way. The people around Boston affected Juliette Kayyem, who will talk with us about what this means. She's a former top Homeland Security official from Massachusetts and for the Obama administration. She is now a columnist for the Boston Globe, and her family was locked down on Friday in the Boston area. Welcome to the program, Juliette.

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