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Author Interviews
1:28 am
Mon April 29, 2013

A Grieving Brother Finds Solace In His Sister's 'Small Town'

Brother and sister Rod Dreher and Ruthie Leming grew up in a small town in rural Louisiana. Dreher left the tightknit community to pursue a journalism career but returned home after Leming died of lung cancer in 2010.
Courtesy Rod Dreher

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 10:21 am

When he was a teenager, journalist Rod Dreher couldn't wait to escape Louisiana. Now he has found his way home again in grief — after his sister's death from lung cancer. It was "in light" of that tragedy, Dreher says, that he discovered the value of community. It's the subject of his new book, The Little Way of Ruthie Leming: A Southern Girl, a Small Town, and the Secret of a Good Life.

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Shots - Health News
1:26 am
Mon April 29, 2013

How To Turn Down The Heat On Fiery Family Arguments

Parents can minimize the negative impact of their arguments on their children using a few simple techniques to calm down.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 8:54 am

All parents are bound to disagree, argue or even raise their voices with each other.

But psychologists say parents can minimize the negative impact of their arguments on their children. It's just a matter of using a few simple techniques to turn down the heat and repair the damage after it's over.

Psychologist Suzanne Phillips at Long Island University says one of the most important things for parents to remember when they're on the verge of a big argument is not to involve the child.

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Shots - Health News
1:26 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Shhh, The Kids Can Hear You Arguing (Even When They're Asleep)

Even during sleep, babies' brains continue to take in and process angry voices.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 6:17 pm

For years now, psychologists have been telling couples who yell at one another to stop for the sake of the kids. Such conflict in the home — even when no violence is involved — is associated with a host of negative behavioral and life outcomes for children.

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All Tech Considered
1:25 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Blazing The Trail For Female Programmers

Sarah Allen works with interns Lori Hsu (left) and Fito von Zastrow at the Blazing Cloud offices in San Francisco.
Ramin Rahimian for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 3:35 pm

This story is part of our series, The Changing Lives of Women.

Sarah Allen has been the only woman on a team of computer programmers a few times in the more than two decades she has worked in the field. Most notably, she led the team — as the lone female programmer — that created Flash video, the dominant technology for streaming video on the Web.

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U.S.
1:23 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Colorado's New Gun Laws Send Businesses Packing

Workers assemble 30-round capacity magazines at the Magpul Industries plant in Erie, Colo. The company, which employs 200 people, says it plans to move its entire operation out of the state.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 7:11 am

Colorado responded to the mass shootings in Aurora, Colo., and Newtown, Conn., by passing new gun control measures last month. That's not sitting well with several gun-related businesses in the Centennial State, where four companies have announced plans to relocate all or some of their operations.

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Music
7:16 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Xenia Rubinos: Adventures In Syncopation

Xenia Rubinos' debut album is titled Magic Trix.
Courtesy of the artist

Brooklyn-based keyboardist and vocalist Xenia Rubinos likes to play with syncopation. Her debut album, Magic Trix, is based around rhythms that sometimes are identifiable as Caribbean, and at other times veer into the experimental.

"It's something I have a lot of fun with — just taking one rhythmic figure and turning it around as many ways as I can," Rubinos says. "That's a huge part of my compositional process, just messing around with something very simple and seeing how far I can take it."

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Around the Nation
4:40 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Finding A Home After Sandy — Temporarily

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Six months after Hurricane Sandy, nearly 1,000 New Yorkers are still living in temporary housing, hotel rooms paid for by the city.

DAPHNE MURPHY: My name is Daphne Murphy and I'm from Rockaway Park, Queens.

MARTIN: Daphne and her long-term boyfriend were living in a Rockaway Park bungalow when the storm hit.

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Author Interviews
3:27 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Iran's Political Scene Is Sketchy For Cartoonists

"War" by Touka Neyestani: Neyestani received a degree in architecture from Tehran's Science and Industry University, and has been a cartoonist for more than 30 years.
International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 10:32 am

Iranian newspapers are rife with cartoons. They are a tradition, and play a big role voicing criticism of the country's authoritarian regime.

Increasingly, though, Iranian cartoonists have been imprisoned, received death threats, or gone into exile because of their work.

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U.S.
3:18 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Teen Sexual Assault: Where Does The Conversation Start?

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 4:59 pm

The narrative has become all too familiar: accusations of sexual assault, followed by bullying of the victims on social media.

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The Two-Way
3:09 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Janos Starker, A Master Of The Cello, Dies At 88

Hungarian-born American cellist Janos Starker died Sunday at 88. Starker's career included more than 165 recordings, as well as decades of teaching.
Erich Auerbach Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 8:24 am

Cellist Janos Starker has died at 88, ending a life and career that saw him renowned for his skills as a soloist, his prodigious work with orchestras, and his commitment to teaching. Starker was born in Budapest in 1924; his path to becoming an international star included surviving life in a Nazi labor camp.

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Music
2:31 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

New Cuban Sounds Rooted In Tradition From 'Global Village'

The Miami group Tiempo Libre combines hip-hop, R&B, rock and pan-Latin sounds to create a distinctive version of Cuban party music known as timba.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:38 pm

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Media
2:27 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Anti-Drug PSAs: Do They Work?

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:38 pm

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History
2:21 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

First He Invented The Phone. Then, Bell Left A Voice Message

Though the quality of the sound recordings is poor, we know what Alexander Graham Bell was saying because he left transcripts.
Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 2:28 pm

As the inventor of the telephone, Alexander Graham Bell is credited with bringing countless voices to our ears. And now, for the first time, here he is imploring us to hear his own voice:

The sound is scratchy. You have to strain to decipher it, but the words are clear. They're from Bell's lips, recorded in 1885 but unveiled just last week by the Smithsonian.

"It lets us know what the past was really like. It fills in a gap for people," says Shari Stout, collections manager at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

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The Two-Way
1:36 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Japan Marks 'Restoration Of Sovereignty' For The First Time

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe delivers a speech Sunday in Tokyo as Emperor Akihito, third from right, and Empress Michiko, second from right, listen during a ceremony marking the day Japan recovered its sovereignty under the San Francisco Peace treaty in 1952.
Itsuo Inouye AP

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 4:06 am

Japan marked for the first time Sunday the end of the allied occupation of the country following its defeat in World War II.

"We have a responsibility to make Japan a strong and resolute country that others across the world can rely on," Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said at a ceremony in Tokyo that was attended by dignitaries, including Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko.

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The Two-Way
12:26 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Iraq Pulls 10 Broadcasters' Licenses Over Sectarian Violence

Iraqi officials have suspended the right of 10 satellite TV channels to operate in the country, as media regulators say the stations' coverage of sectarian conflicts incites more violence.

"Most of the channels, including local stations such as 'Baghdad' and 'al-Sharqiya,' are pro-Sunni and often critical of the Shi'ite-led government," Reuters reports. "Al Jazeera is based in Qatar, a Sunni-ruled kingdom."

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The Two-Way
11:56 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Deadly Bangladesh Collapse: Building Owner Arrested

Sohel Rana, the fugitive owner of an illegally constructed building that collapsed last week in Bangladesh, killing some 377 people, is paraded by Rapid Action Battalion commandoes for the media in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Sunday.
Palash Khan AP

Bangladeshi authorities arrested Sunday the owner of the building that collapsed last week outside the capital, Dhaka, killing more than 300 people.

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The Two-Way
11:41 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Obama And O'Brien Take Jabs At Politics And Media (Highlights)

President Obama joked at the White House Correspondents' Dinner that he had experimented with bangs to liven up his second term, stealing a fashion tip from the first lady, Michelle Obama.
CSPAN

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 12:38 pm

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The Two-Way
7:24 am
Sun April 28, 2013

For Afghan Policewomen, Danger Often Comes From Colleagues

Afghan policewomen take part in a training exercise in the western province of Herat in 2011. Policewomen face frequent sexual harassment and assaults, often carried out by policemen, human rights groups say.
Sardar Xinhua/Landov

It seems almost trivial at first: the latest Human Rights Watch report on Afghanistan says female police officers need their own toilets. Sure, who's going to argue with that. But why is it a big deal?

Here's how it unfolds.

Female police officers are experiencing high levels of harassment, sexual assault and rape — often at the hands of their male colleagues. Where is most of this activity taking place? In police station bathrooms and changing rooms.

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The Two-Way
7:04 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Tamerlan Tsarnaev Spoke Of Jihad With Mother, Reports Say

Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, center, mother of Boston Marathon bombing suspects Tamerlan and Dzhokhar, reportedly spoke of radical ideas with her eldest son in 2011. Anzor Tsarnaeva, the boys' father, is on the left. At right is the boys' aunt, Patimat Suleymanova.
Getty Images Getty Images

Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev "vaguely discussed" jihad during a 2011 phone conversation with his mother, according to a U.S. official who described the recording to the Associated Press. The call, taped by a Russian government agency, reportedly did not include any mention of a plot inside the U.S.

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Science
5:10 am
Sun April 28, 2013

From Coast To Coast with The Power Of The Sun

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Your Money
5:09 am
Sun April 28, 2013

What's Changed About Saving For Retirement?

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We wanted to hear what younger people are thinking about when it comes to retirement and the viability of Social Security. Here's reaction from 20- and 30-somethings in Nashville, Tennessee.

ROD KELLY: I don't expect it to be there and I'm not planning on it to be there. I'm doing what I can right now to put into, like, IRA, you know, or Roth funds to make sure that I don't have to depend on it.

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Asia
5:09 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Koreans In U.S. Have Mixed Reaction To North's Threats

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Here in the U.S., the largest Korean population is in California. It's actually the largest concentration outside of northeast Asia. People in that community have been especially alarmed by North Korea's recent threats. But as Doualy Xaykaothao reports from Los Angeles, many Koreans living there think the North's provocations are mostly bluster.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHATTER)

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Politics
5:09 am
Sun April 28, 2013

The Ins And Outs Of Obama's Social Security Plan

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sports
5:09 am
Sun April 28, 2013

The NFL Draft: Football's Dog And Pony Show

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SPORTS THEM MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The 78th Annual National Football League players' selection meeting, what you probably think of as the NFL draft, well, it wrapped up yesterday. And NPR's Mike Pesca, who is our top pick, was monitoring as it played out over the last three days.

Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Ah, thank you.

MARTIN: You're welcome.

PESCA: Its swell to be a top pick

MARTIN: It was close.

PESCA: I'm putting on the WESUN hat right now.

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Asia
4:41 am
Sun April 28, 2013

N. Korean Refugees Tell Tales of Ordinary, Desperate Lives

Courtesy of Sokeel Park

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

Sokeel Park sees the effects of North Korea's repressive government every day. He lives in South Korea, but works for an NGO named Liberty in North Korea. His job is to debrief those who've managed to leave the North and help them start new lives in the South.

Park says that with so much focus on the country's nuclear weapons and leadership, it's easy to forget about the 24 million people going about their everyday lives. Those lives are heavily controlled by the North Korean government, citizens are told where to work, where to live, and are not allowed to leave.

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Author Interviews
4:41 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Making Gains Abroad 'Begins At Home'

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

There's been a lot of talk about a red line this past week and whether the regime of Bashar al-Assad in Syria has crossed it. After U.S. intelligence reports came out saying with varying degrees of confidence that Syrian forces have used chemical weapons on rebels and civilians, President Obama said he is still weighing America's response.

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Analysis
4:41 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Leading Senate Democrat Has Concerns With U.S. Drones

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 11:28 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
3:29 am
Sun April 28, 2013

The Challenges Of Making A Film In Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia film director Haifaa Al-Mansour (right) receives the award of best film for her movie Wadjda at Dubai International Film Festival in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, on Dec. 16, 2012.
Ali Haider EPA/Landov

The Saudi Arabian movie Wadjda has been on a winning streak.

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Code Switch
3:13 am
Sun April 28, 2013

For Some Young Latinos: Donkey Jaws And Latino Roots

Marco Santiago plays a quijada in his home.
Farida Jhabvala Romero Radio Bilingue

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 12:40 pm

We love hearing stories of how you straddle all the different cultures in your life. That's why we're sharing this report, about retro-acculturation, from our friends at Latino USA.

The process of integrating into mainstream America is a complex one if you are an immigrant. Often, people lose touch with their country of origin.

But for people like Marco Polo Santiago, the reverse is also true. Second, third and fourth-generation immigrants are seeking out their roots and creating a trend of their own.

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It's All Politics
3:12 am
Sun April 28, 2013

House Leadership Crashes Into Outside Hurdles On Bills

House Speaker John Boehner speaks to the media during his weekly news conference on Capitol Hill on April 18.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:40 pm

The House was set to vote this week on a bill modifying the president's health care law. The Republican bill was supported by the leadership, but ran into trouble and was pulled from the floor before the scheduled vote.

It's an example of the kind of obstacles Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, faces in getting legislation through the House. In many recent cases, his problem hasn't been the Democrats as much as members of his own party, backed by proudly conservative outside groups.

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