NPR News

New rules for how Internet traffic is governed were officially unveiled and approved for public comment following a 3-2 vote Thursday by members of the Federal Communications Commission.

Educating Girls: Big Payoff For $45 A Year

May 15, 2014

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Nigeria has been in the news a lot lately. That's since the militant Islamic organization Boko Haram kidnapped hundreds of schoolgirls on April 15. Professed to be against Western education, Boko Haram took the girls away from their books and their teachers and have threatened to sell them as wives and slaves.

Singer songwriter Ledisi has had eight Grammy nominations, and says she is grateful for that. "I would like to win, but it will happen when its time."

For more than 10 years, Ledisi has garnered an international fan base while striving to grow her musical abilities.

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Our friends at All Things Considered have been collecting stories of moments when people's careers took off. It's called My Big Break.

They recently spoke to Dr. Sampson Davis who grew up in the rough parts of Newark, N.J. He talked about how doing a stint in juvie put his life in perspective.

After Cory Booker, Newark Takes A New Turn

May 15, 2014

It's not Cory Booker's city any longer.

In Newark's first mayoral election since the Democratic senator left for Washington, voters picked a progressive candidate whose election signaled a break from both the Booker era and the period of dominance Republican Gov. Chris Christie has had over New Jersey politics.

Ras Baraka, a city councilman, won election as mayor Tuesday after running a populist campaign that had strong support from unions and other groups on the left.

A family's story of how their cat ran off a dog that had attacked their young son is making waves far beyond Bakersfield, Calif., as the incident was captured in a dramatic video. Surveillance cameras caught the dog viciously biting Jeremy Triantafilo and dragging him — before the family cat rushes to his rescue.

"She's a hero!" 4-year-old Jeremy said of the cat, Tara, in an interview with KERO 23 TV. He said, "I love Tara a whole lot."

Updated at 2:33 p.m. ET

Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki told a Senate panel today [Thursday] that he hoped to have a preliminary report within three weeks on the problem of delayed treatment and preventable deaths at VA facilities across the nation.

His testimony came amid allegations that such conditions persisted at a VA hospital in Phoenix. Shinseki said he was "mad as hell" about the reports.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Scene: The happy-hour office party.

Your boss is relaxed, drink in hand. A little liquid courage of your own, and you approach her, taking a shot at an opportunity to impress. You open with a quip. She chuckles.

But does she really mean it? Or is she faking?

Only one-third of people can tell the difference between a fake laugh and the real deal, according to a study by Greg Bryant, a professor of communication at University of California, Los Angeles.

The death toll in the coal mine explosion in Turkey keeps rising, and anger over the incident has spread around the country. Thousands of people staged protests after a speech from Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan in which he suggested such accidents are unavoidable.

Officials say at least 282 mine workers have died in the incident in the city of Soma. That figure seems certain to rise, as about 100 people are still missing. The mine explosion is already being called the deadliest industrial disaster in Turkey's history.

Alec Baldwin, you were salmoning!

The actor was ticketed in New York on Tuesday for riding his bicycle the wrong way on a one-way street.

Cyclists use the term "salmoning" to describe a biker going against the stream on a one-way bike lane. Surely the definition can be broadened to include Baldwin's infraction.

Crude oil geysered high into the air in northeast Los Angeles early Thursday morning, creating a spill that fire officials say was knee-deep in some spots. The spill happened in an industrial section of Atwater Village, causing the evacuation of a nearby strip club.

Update at 8:10 a.m. ET: Oil Estimate Downgraded

After initially saying that "over 50,000" gallons of oil had spilled from a ruptured pipeline, Los Angeles Fire Department officials now say the correct figure is about 10,000 gallons.

Our original post continues:

Studio Turns Potholes Into Art

May 15, 2014

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. "Positively Filling Negative Space" was the arty title of a 2012 project by the Pop Up Studio in Scranton, Pennsylvania. And what space could more negative than a pothole? This month the art group is challenging residents to turn potholes into art. Photo entries show potholes transformed into a bird's nest, oysters on ice, a sudsy sink, a bowl of spaghetti and a swimming pool surrounded by Barbies in bikinis. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Police in Bucks County, Pennsylvania responded to a burglary report. They found a suspect who said it was a misunderstanding. According to the Courier Times, Christopher King said he was just doing as neighbors do. He broke into his neighbor's home to borrow some eggs for breakfast. Something about that story so makes you want to believe, but King appeared to have been looking for eggs by opening dresser and cabinet drawers throughout the entire house.

Why Inflation Is So Low

May 15, 2014

With the Federal Reserve pumping trillions of dollars into the economy the past several years, why has inflation remained so low?

Poor Johannes Kepler. One of the greatest astronomers ever, the man who figured out the laws of planetary motion, a genius, scholar and mathematician — in 1611, he needed a wife. The previous Mrs. Kepler had died of Hungarian spotted fever, so, with kids to raise and a household to manage, he decided to line up some candidates — but it wasn't going very well.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Transportation advocates are calling this Infrastructure Week. To mark that week, President Obama spoke yesterday on the banks of the Hudson River just north of New York City. Construction is underway there on $3.9 billion replacement for the old Tappan Zee Bridge. Engineers say one out of nine bridges in this country needs repair.

Chinese authorities have arrested or detained dozens of people ahead of the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown. This is an annual ritual ahead of a sensitive political date in China.

Ten years ago this week, attorney Mary Bonauto woke up with more than just your average case of pre-wedding jitters. It had been six months since her arguments had persuaded Massachusetts' highest court to allow the nation's first legal gay marriages, but opponents were still trying to stop the weddings before they started.

"I had been so scared, so many times, during really what had been really a ferocious onslaught to try to keep marriages from ever happening, so I continued to worry," Bonauto recalls.

Who Wears Short Shorts?

May 15, 2014

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And for today's last word in business, we have a new answer to an old question.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED MEN: (Singing) Who wears short shorts?

UNIDENTIFIED WOMEN: (Singing) We wear short shorts.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with friendly skies for airlines.

After a brutal winter, which hurt both American's travels plans and airline profits, things are looking up. More than 200 million passengers are expected to fly on U.S.-based airlines this summer.

According to a leading industry group, A4A, that is the most since the financial crisis six years ago. This included a projected record number of passengers flying from the U.S. to international destinations. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Federal Communications Commission announced last month that it would propose new rules. In a blog post, Chairman Tom Wheeler insists that the open Internet rules will help maintain what's called network neutrality. That is, making certain that your Internet provider doesn't give a faster connection to a service that can pay more.

As bicycling goes, America is far behind Copenhagen, the promised land where roads look like bicycle highways as people pedal to work. But commuting by bike in the U.S. is catching on — though geographic, income and gender disparities persist.

In Chicago, busy Sheridan Road is the start of the Lakefront bike trail on its north side. That's where you can find plenty of bicyclists commuting to work early in the morning.

Picnickers in a riverside park in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, react in horror as a man in a yellow baseball cap named Guillermo Arevalo lies on the bank of the Rio Grande, bleeding to death.

It's a warm Monday evening in September 2012. He has just been shot by an agent on a U.S. Border Patrol airboat on the river. The Border Patrol says the agent shot at rock throwers and that the incident is under investigation.

Barbara Walters had a big interview recently: She spoke with V. Stiviano, the girlfriend of disgraced L.A. Clippers owner Donald Sterling.

"Are you in love with Donald Sterling?" Walters asks. "I love him," Stiviano answers. There's a little back-and-forth about the nature of their love, and in the end, Stiviano admits she's not in love with Sterling, but she does love him "like a father figure."

The Kansas Board of Regents gave final approval Wednesday to a strict new policy on what employees may say on social media. Critics say the policy violates both the First Amendment and academic freedom, but school officials say providing faculty with more specific guidelines will actually bolster academic freedom on campus.

The controversial policy was triggered by an equally controversial tweet posted last September by David Guth, an associate journalism professor. Reacting to a lone gunman who killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., he wrote:

The West Virginia mine where two workers were fatally injured on Monday consistently violated federal mine safety laws, but federal regulators say they were unable to shut it down completely.

The Mine Safety and Health Administration confirmed that two workers were killed on May 12 when coal and rocks burst from mine walls at Patriot Coal's Brody No. 1 mine in Boone County, W.Va.

In eastern Ukraine, pro-Russian separatists are claiming independence based on a victory in a hastily organized referendum. Now, they're resisting a nationwide presidential election that's scheduled for May 25.

With Russian troops still massed near the border, Ukrainian and international mediators are trying to find a solution for the crisis.

There are some very different visions of the future for the volatile region.

It's been well over a month since the Senate Intelligence Committee voted 11 to 3 to declassify and make public the executive summary and findings of its "Torture Report."

But it's not likely that will actually happen anytime soon.

The reason? The CIA — the very agency skewered in the 6,200-page report for its interrogation and detention of more than 100 terrorism suspects from 2001 through 2008 — has been given the job of deciding what to leave in and what to take out of the summary and findings.

And the CIA seems to be in no great rush to finish that job.

When hundreds of California nutritionists and dietitians gathered for their annual conference in April, their Friday lunch was a bacon ranch salad, chocolate chip cookies and a pink yogurt parfait, all courtesy of McDonald's.

Pages