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Remembrances
10:20 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Remembering Monster-Maker Ray Harryhausen

Medusa from 1981's Clash of the Titans is among legendary animator Ray Harryhausen's many creations.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 12:19 pm

Ray Harryhausen, who died Tuesday in London at age 92, became fascinated with animation after seeing King Kong in 1933. He went on to create some of the most memorable monsters of old Hollywood, from dinosaurs to mythological creatures.

His monsters, however, were never completely divorced from the real world.

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Around the Nation
10:15 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Cleveland Hostage's Mom 'Died Of A Broken Heart'

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 10:17 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, kidnapping survivor Elizabeth Smart spoke out earlier this week about lessons she hopes others will learn from her ordeal, including how to talk to young women about sex. We'll speak with a writer and blogger who shares Smart's Mormon faith about this in just a few minutes.

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Shots - Health News
9:44 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Price Break For Cervical Cancer Shots In Developing World

WHO/IARC

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 9:10 am

Cervical cancer takes its greatest toll in the countries whose economies and health systems are poorest.

Women in those places are less likely than those in rich countries to get regular Pap tests to detect the cancers when it can be treated effectively.

Of the 275,000 women who die of cervical cancer each year, more than 85 percent, or at least 234,000, are in low-income countries.

But a vaccine that can prevent cervical cancer could go a long way toward lowering the risk in those less developed countries. Problem is, the shots are pretty expensive.

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The Salt
9:17 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Wrigley: Maybe We Won't Sell Caffeinated Gum After All

Wrigley took its new Alert Energy Caffeine Gum off the market after it prompted FDA scrutiny of caffeinated foods.
Wrigley Incorporated

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 10:20 am

Less than two weeks after launching its Alert Energy Caffeine Gum, the Wrigley Company decided that maybe the world wasn't ready for amped-up chewing gum after all.

On April 30, the day after Alert Energy launched, the Food and Drug Administration said it was going to take a "fresh look" at caffeinated foods, particularly their effect on children and teenagers.

Being out front on caffeinated confections evidently wasn't a comfortable place to be.

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The Two-Way
9:13 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Everton's Moyes To Replace Ferguson At Man United

Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson (left) and Everton manager David Moyes (right) during a match in April 2012. Moyes will succeed the retiring Ferguson at Man United.
Peter Powell EPA /LANDOV

One day after the world's most famous soccer coach announced his upcoming retirement, his replacement has been chosen.

The English Premier League's Everton Football Club announced Thursday that manager David Moyes would step down after its last game this season, on May 19. According to the club:

"The manager met Chairman Bill Kenwright early yesterday evening (Wednesday 8th May) and confirmed his desire to join Manchester United."

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The Two-Way
8:33 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Boston Bombing Suspect's Body Finally 'Entombed,' Police Say

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, as seen in a video taken on April 15 near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.
FBI.gov

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 8:54 am

The body of Boston Marathon bombings suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev "is now entombed," the Worcester, Mass., police department announced Thursday morning.

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The Two-Way
8:31 am
Thu May 9, 2013

California's Bay Bridge Hits Trouble Ahead Of Opening Day

It's uncertain whether the Bay Bridge connecting San Francisco and Oakland will be ready for its planned grand opening on Labor Day, as engineers work to solve a problem stemming from broken steel rods.
San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge Project

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 12:48 pm

Faced with lingering safety concerns over the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge's new eastern span, California transportation officials say it will take more work — and up to $10 million — to get the bridge ready for its planned grand opening on Labor Day.

They discovered the problem after massive steel bolts were tightened to anchor part of the bridge's seismic safety system. Of the 96 that were tightened, 32 broke.

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It's All Politics
8:18 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Five Reasons Vetoes Have Gone Out Of Style

President Obama may not like the bills Congress considers, but he has vetoed only two of them.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 12:40 pm

President Obama in recent weeks has twice threatened to veto legislation before Congress. Don't hold your breath that it will happen.

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The Two-Way
7:50 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Feds Didn't Tell Boston Police About Probe Of Tsarnaev

Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis.
Michael Reynolds EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 11:29 am

(We put a new top on this post at 1:25 p.m. ET.)

"The FBI never told the Boston police or the Massachusetts State Police about possible Russian terror connections of the suspected Marathon bombers until three and half days after the attack, law enforcement officials testified today before the House Homeland Security Committee," ABC News writes.

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Jobless Claims Stay Near 5-Year Low

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 8:16 am

There were 323,000 first-time claims for unemployment insurance last week, down 4,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration says.

Note: As often happens, the previous week's figure is a slight revision from what was reported earlier. Initially, the ETA said there had been 324,000 first-time claims during the week ending April 27. Now, it says there were 327,000 that week.

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The Two-Way
6:06 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Reports: Cousin Of Boston Suspects Is A 'Prominent Islamist'

This image from a surveillance video, taken near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, helped investigators identify Tamerlan Tsarnaev (in black cap) and his brother, Dzhokhar (in white cap), as the main suspects in the bombings.
FBI.gov

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 6:38 am

Russian investigators have questioned a distant cousin of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev about meetings the two of them had in Dagestan during 2012, Time magazine reports.

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Around the Nation
5:22 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Former Heavyweight Champ Wants To Try Shakespeare

Mike Tyson tells the New York Daily News he would like to play Othello. Reviews of his acting have been mixed, but Tyson says he could do it, given time to prepare. "They say my skills are horrible," he says, "but I have the natural timing."

The Two-Way
5:16 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Book News: Hacker Leaks Part Of 'Sex And The City' Author's New Book

Author Candace Bushnell attends the March 2010 DVF Awards at the United Nations in New York City.
Neilson Barnard Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
5:16 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Gas Scare Attributed To Firm's Educational Cards

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

A natural gas company in Great Falls, Mont., wanted to educate consumers. So it printed up 25,000 scratch-and-sniff cards to show how a gas leak would smell. Then yesterday, the company tossed some of the cards. And as they were crushed in a garbage truck, the gas smell filled the town.

Several buildings were evacuated after people reported gas leaks. The company apologized, but said that their campaign, in a sense, worked.

The Two-Way
5:14 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Prosecutors May Seek Death Penalty For Cleveland Kidnapper

Ariel Castro during his arraignment Thursday at Cleveland Municipal Court. He's accused of kidnapping and raping three young women, and then holding a daughter born to one of those women captive. The women had been missing for about a decade. The child is now six years old.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 5:31 pm

(Most recent update: 7:24 p.m. ET.)

The three young women who were missing for about a decade before being rescued Monday from a home in Cleveland where they say they were chained, tortured and sexually assaulted, have given police similar accounts about how their long nightmares began.

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Business
3:45 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Shell Digs Deep To Tap Into Lucrative Oil, Gas Reserves

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 3:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

One reason the world is not yet running out of oil and gas is that energy companies keep finding ways to extract those resources from more and more difficult places, including far under the ocean. Royal Dutch Shell announced plans, yesterday, for the world's deepest offshore floating oil and gas facility.

NPR's Debbie Elliott reports.

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Education
3:45 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Perry's Vision For University Of Texas Criticized

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 4:08 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. It's college graduation season, a time when young people stop worrying about final exams and start worrying about getting a job. In a minute we'll hear some popular career advice dished out by commencement speakers. First, there's an ongoing debate over how well universities are preparing graduates for the real world and whether colleges themselves should operate more like businesses.

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NPR Story
3:45 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Chinese Police Clamp Down On Protesters After Worker's Death

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 5:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Chinese security forces are patrolling the streets of southern Beijing today in great numbers, apparently to try and send a message to protesters. This follows a large demonstration yesterday at a shopping mall in the southern part of the capital, where protesters accused police of mishandling an investigation into the death of a 22-year-old migrant woman who worked there. It is just the latest example of mass unrest in China, and with each incident, police presence seems to be growing.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
1:47 am
Thu May 9, 2013

She Works: Having It All

Doby Photography NPR

For our series on the Changing Lives of Women, we're asking NPR women about their careers — and inviting you to join the conversation. This question goes to All Things Considered host Audie Cornish.

Question: What does it mean to have it all?

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Planet Money
1:40 am
Thu May 9, 2013

I Know I'm Supposed To Follow My Passion. But What If I Don't Have A Passion?

Climb every mountain? Really?
Jean-Pierre Clatot AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 7:47 am

A while back, Max Kornblith sent the following email to Tyler Cowen, an economist who blogs at Marginal Revolution:

1) As a fairly recent graduate of an Ivy League institution (with a bachelor's degree), most of my classmates seemed to have some idea that career and life path choice should be driven by a "passion" such that the right choice is self-evident to the chooser. What does this belief mean to you as a social scientist? ...

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All Tech Considered
1:33 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Consumers Facing Subscription Service Overload Will Only Get More Choices

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 2:02 pm

YouTube is expected to announce in the coming days that it will launch paid subscription channels, a first for the online video platform that's been around since 2005. But, with the growing number of subscription services available for entertainment, shopping and news, some consumers say they're reaching digital subscription overload.

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It's All Politics
1:32 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Democrats Hope For A Bright Future In The Lone Star State

Voters leave the Old Blanco Courthouse in Blanco, Texas, after casting their ballots in November 2012. Democrats hope demographics and a new organizational push give them a brighter future in Texas.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 3:51 am

President Obama travels to Texas on Thursday for the second time in as many weeks. He will talk about job training and economic opportunity, but he may have a political opportunity on his mind as well.

Obama lost Texas by more than 1 million votes last year. But Democrats believe their fortunes in the Lone Star State may soon change, thanks to demographics and a new organizational push.

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All Tech Considered
1:31 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Stitching Connections Between U.S. Fashion Designers, Makers

Universal Elliot Corp., a belt-maker in New York City, is one of the fashion companies featured on the Maker's Row website.
Courtesy of Maker's Row

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 3:51 am

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Shots - Health News
1:30 am
Thu May 9, 2013

California Weighs Expanded Role For Nurse Practitioners

Nurse Practioner Tina Clark examines Anastacia Casperson at the Glide Health Clinic in San Francisco.
Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio Flickr

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 1:14 pm

As states gear up for the Affordable Care Act, they're trying to figure out if there will be enough providers of health care to meet demand from the newly insured.

California is one of 15 states expected to consider legislation this year that would give advanced practice nurses more authority to care for patients without a doctor's supervision.

Tina Clark is a nurse practitioner at Glide Health Services, a clinic in San Francisco's Tenderloin district, a low-income section of the city.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
1:29 am
Thu May 9, 2013

From Mother To Daughter On 'Having It All'

Anne-Marie Slaughter with her mother, Anne, and father, Edward.
Courtesy of Anne-Marie Slaughter

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 4:51 am

Anne-Marie Slaughter had been the director of policy planning for the State Department for two years — commuting from Princeton, N.J., where her family lived, to Washington, D.C., where the job was — when she realized something had to give.

"It was a fabulous job, but at the end of two years I simply had to recognize that I needed to be at home," Slaughter tells Morning Edition's Renee Montagne. Moreover, she adds, "I wanted to be at home, and there was no way to do that and to do the kind of job that Secretary Clinton needed me to do."

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Movie Interviews
12:54 am
Thu May 9, 2013

An Epic Of India Gets A Canvas Its Own Size

Parvati and Saleem (Shriya Saran and Satya Bhabha), born in tandem at the birth of independent India, are at the center of Salman Rushdie's novel Midnight's Children. Thirty years after the book's publication, filmmaker Deepa Mehta has committed the story to the big screen.
108 Media

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 4:54 am

In the 1970s, Salman Rushdie was an unknown writer living in London. He decided to return to the country of his birth and rough it across India on what he describes as "extraordinarily long 15-hour bus rides with chickens vomiting on our feet."

That trip inspired Midnight's Children, the Booker Prize-winning novel that many consider Rushdie's literary masterpiece. Now, more than 30 years after it was published, Midnight's Children arrives on the big screen in a glittering film adaptation from Oscar-nominated director Deepa Mehta.

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Business
12:51 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Furloughs Only The Latest Blow To Federal Worker Morale

Federal employees demonstrate against the U.S. budget sequester, outside New York's Federal Plaza on Tuesday.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 3:51 am

Federal workers say they don't have much to celebrate these days.

Furloughs began in April, exacerbating already low morale for many government agencies as budgets have tightened. Downsizing has meant more work for those who remain, and talk of further cuts has many worried about job security. This year is also the third that federal workers haven't received a pay increase, contributing to discontent.

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The Two-Way
4:55 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Death Toll Tops 800 In Bangladesh Factory Collapse

Bangladeshi rescue and army personnel on Wednesday continue recovery operations at the site of the building collapse near Dhaka.
Munir Uz Zaman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 7:19 am

Authorities in Bangladesh say the death toll in last month's collapse of an eight-story garment factory complex has surpassed 800 as dozens more bodies were pulled from the rubble on Wednesday.

The latest corpses to be recovered were so badly decomposed that they were being sent to a lab for DNA identification, police said, according to The Associated Press.

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The Two-Way
4:44 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Scientist Stephen Hawking To Boycott Israeli Conference

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 6:28 am

British physicist Stephen Hawking has stepped into a political black hole.

He announced this week that he was withdrawing from a conference in Israel to protest that country's treatment of Palestinians, throwing his weight behind an academic boycott of the Jewish state. The Guardian reports:

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It's All Politics
4:09 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Census: Black Voting Surpassed White in 2012

Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at Cleveland Avenue Baptist Church in Kansas City, Mo., on Nov. 6, 2012.
Julie Denesha Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 8:46 pm

Black voters showed up at the polls at higher rates than whites in last year's presidential election, driving the rate of minority participation to historic levels, a new government report shows.

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