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Music Interviews
3:45 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

'It Led Us On A Journey': The Musical World Of 'The Great Gatsby'

Leonardo DiCaprio and Carey Mulligan star in Baz Lurhmann's adaptation of The Great Gatsby — but the new film's music is so bold it may as well be a character, too.
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Picture

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 7:47 am

When movie director Baz Lurhmann got his hands on F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, a 21st century-Jazz Age mashup was inevitable. Vivid, anachronistic style is standard in Luhrmann's films: His take on Romeo + Juliet was a Technicolor fever dream for the MTV generation, and Moulin Rouge put Verdi's La Traviata through a genre blender.

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Sports
3:45 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Not Even Instant Replay Could Prevent These Bad Calls

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 5:23 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Major League Baseball has admitted that umpires have made some big mistakes in the last few days. On Wednesday, umpires ruled even after looking at television replays that Adam Rosales of the Oakland A's hit a double. The ball clearly left the park with the game on the line. And last night in Houston, umps botched a fairly simple rule about pitchers. NPR's Mike Pesca joins us now to second-guess the men in black. And, Mike, everyone makes mistakes, right, even umpires. Why are they getting picked on?

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The Two-Way
3:27 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

White House Denies Any 'Substantive' Edits To Benghazi Memo

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice speaks to the media during a visit to Benghazi in 2011.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 4:07 pm

The White House says it made only minimal changes to the now-discredited talking points used to discuss the deadly attack last year on a U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya.

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The Salt
2:59 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

How Swedish Malort Became Chicago's Mascot Bitter Drink

World Shattered, a cocktail by Tyler Fry of the Chicago bar The Violet Hour. The drink includes R. Franklin's Original Recipe Malort, and tames the bitterness with lemon, honey syrup, raspberry and mint.
Courtesy of Eden Laurin

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 4:43 pm

The people who make Jeppson's Malort, a harshly bitter spirit that's consumed in shots or cocktails, don't mind that their product makes people grimace. Instead, they celebrate it.

Carl Jeppson Co., a Chicago company, has built a minor social media empire around malort's "brutal" flavor; one winner of its slogan contest described the drink as "turning taste buds into taste foes for generations."

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NPR Story
2:59 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Benghazi Investigator Reacts To Criticism Of His Report

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 5:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. At congressional hearings this week, three witnesses introduced as State Department whistleblowers criticized the administration's handling of last September's assault on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya. That attack claimed the life of United States Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.

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NPR Story
2:59 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Book Review: 'A Nearly Perfect Copy'

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 5:23 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Allison Amend is out with her third book. It's a novel called "A Nearly Perfect Copy." It features richly detailed characters, including an art dealer gone bad, and it's set in both Paris and New York. Our review Alan Cheuse found it all quite delectable.

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It's All Politics
2:57 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Benghazi Review Leader Offered To Testify On Capitol Hill

When the House held its much-anticipated hearing on Benghazi Wednesday, one major figure not at the witness table was Thomas Pickering, the former ambassador and co-chair of the Accountability Review Board that reported on last September's attacks.

Why wasn't he there?

That's somewhat in dispute. California Republican Darrell Issa, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, put the blame squarely on the shoulders of Pickering and report co-author Adm. Mike Mullen.

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Movie Reviews
2:47 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Polley's 'Stories': A Family Saga Strikingly Spun

A young Sarah Polley and her actor father, Michael Polley, on a long-ago day; the photo is one of many family memories that surface in Stories We Tell, a superb meditation on dramatizing memory from the director of Away from Her.
Roadside Attractions

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 3:58 am

Sarah Polley grew up the fifth of five children in a Canadian theatrical family. Her father, Michael, is a transplanted British actor; her mother, Diane, was an actress and casting director. No wonder Sarah feels her family's narrative has the stuff of drama.

"I'm interested in the way we tell stories about our lives," she says in the film, "about the fact that the truth about the past is often ephemeral and difficult to pin down."

Prophetic words, those.

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The Two-Way
2:37 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Celebrity Panda To Return To Thailand, For $1 Million A Year

The giant panda Lin Ping, a star in Thailand whose mandatory trip to China was due at the end of May, can spend up to 15 years in Thailand, under a deal announced this week. The 43-day-old Lin Ping was held by her mother, Lin Hui, in this 2009 photo.
Wichai Taprieu AP

The citizens of Thailand are breathing a sigh of relief, after a breakthrough moment in panda relations was reached with China Friday. After much negotiation, Lin Ping, a female giant panda who became a reality TV star after being born in Thailand's Chiang Mai Zoo, will be allowed to stay in Thailand for 15 years.

The pact comes just weeks before Lin Ping was to travel to China; under the terms of the deal that brought her parents to Thailand, zoo officials were obligated to send Lin Ping to China by her fourth birthday, on May 27.

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It's All Politics
1:59 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Benghazi Schools Obama In The Politics Of Scandal

A burned vehicle outside the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after the Sept. 11, 2012, attack.
Esam Omran Al-Fetori Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 2:45 pm

President Obama has led an administration that so far has avoided a headline-grabbing, signature scandal. But now he's learning how one begins to take shape.

In many ways, the Benghazi story is following the arc of many Washington scandals of the past. It's rarely the initial incident that gets politicians in trouble. Instead, it's the way in which they respond to it.

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Shots - Health News
1:24 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Judge Denies Administration's Request To Delay Plan-B Ruling

U.S. District Judge Korman of New York is steamed about the administration's handling of the Plan B One-Step morning-after pill.
AP

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 5:36 am

The U.S. District Court judge who last month ordered the Food and Drug Administration to make the most popular forms of the emergency contraceptive pill available over-the-counter with no age restrictions has denied the government's request to stay his ruling while it's on appeal.

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Environment
12:46 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Atop A Hawaiian Mountain, A Constant Sniff For Carbon Dioxide

Researchers use the 120-foot tower atop Mauna Loa in Hawaii to collect air samples and measure the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Mauna Kea looms in the distance.
Forrest M. Mims III forrestmims.org

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 11:22 am

Climate scientists have a good reason to want to get away from it all. To get an accurate picture of the amount of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere, you have to find places where the numbers won't be distorted by cities or factories or even lots of vegetation that can have a major local impact on CO2 concentrations.

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The Two-Way
12:43 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Boston Bombing Suspect Buried In Secret At Virginia Cemetery

Bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, in a surveillance image taken shortly before the blasts that struck the Boston Marathon last month.
Bob Leonard Associated Press

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 1:07 pm

Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev has been interred at a Muslim cemetery in central Virginia after a two-week ordeal in which a Massachusetts funeral director sought in vain to find a burial location.

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Radio Diaries
11:30 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Teenage Diaries Revisited: Mother And Son Listen To The Past

In the late 1990s, Melissa Rodriguez struggled to create a stable life at home for her son, who is now a teenager. Together, they've faced many challenges.
Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 8:18 am

Name: Melissa Rodriguez

Hometown: New Haven, Conn.

Current city: Orange, N.J.

Occupation: Customer service representative

Then:

"I just started my life. I just started to go to school, I just started working, and I just didn't have anything settled yet."

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The Two-Way
11:18 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Will Imran Khan Shake Up Pakistani Politics This Time?

A supporter greets Imran Khan at a campaign rally on May 6, in Multan, Pakistan. Pakistan's parliamentary elections will be held on Saturday, and Khan's party is hoping the large, enthusiastic crowds at rallies will translate into a strong showing at the polls.
Daniel Berehulak Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 12:38 pm

After retiring as Pakistan's most celebrated cricket player, Imran Khan has dabbled on the margins of Pakistani politics for nearly two decades, trying to make a mark.

The sportsman turned philanthropist who led a playboy lifestyle in his younger days has attracted endless media attention, but until now neither he nor his movement has had any real impact.

As Pakistanis vote in a crucial parliamentary election on Saturday, could this time be different?

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The Two-Way
11:18 am
Fri May 10, 2013

IRS Apologizes For Singling Out Conservative Groups

Dennis Brack Landov

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 4:14 pm

Update at 6:10 p.m. ET: White House: IRS was 'Inappropriate':

White House press secretary Jay Carney called the IRS actions "inappropriate" and said they should be investigated.

Carney, speaking to reporters Friday afternoon, noted that the Internal Revenue Service is an independent agency with only two political appointees.

Here's our original post:

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Shots - Health News
10:54 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Kids With Autism Quick To Detect Motion

Did you see that?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 5:37 am

Children with autism see simple movements twice as fast as other children their age, a new study finds.

Researchers at Vanderbilt University and the University of Rochester were looking to test a common theory about autism which holds that overwhelming sensory stimulation inhibits other brain functions. The researchers figured they could check that by studying how kids with autism process moving images.

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It's All Politics
10:43 am
Fri May 10, 2013

How New York Became One Of The Most Corrupt States

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 1:51 pm

It's happening again.

Rarely a month seems to pass when there isn't some state legislator in New York facing indictment.

The latest, former Democratic state Sen. Shirley Huntley, was sentenced Thursday to spend a year and a day in prison for stealing $88,000 from a charity she controlled. A day earlier, a federal judge had unsealed records showing that Huntley last year secretly recorded conversations with seven other elected officials she suspected of corruption.

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Environment
10:27 am
Fri May 10, 2013

'Dangerous Territory:' Carbon Dioxide Levels Reach Iconic High

Carbon dioxide readings at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii have reached what atmospheric scientist Ralph Keeling calls a "psychological threshold" of 400 parts per million. The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has been steadily increasing since near-constant measurements began at the observatory in 1958.
Jonathan Kingston National Geographic/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 5:26 pm

Earth's atmosphere is entering a new era. A mountaintop research station that has been tracking carbon dioxide for more than 50 years says the level of that gas in our air has reached a milestone: 400 parts per million.

That number is one of the clearest measures of how human beings are changing the planet. It shows how much carbon we have put into the air from burning fossil fuels — and that carbon dioxide drives global warming.

This measurement comes from Mauna Loa, Hawaii, a remote volcano where the air is largely free of local influences.

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The Two-Way
10:27 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Malcolm X's Grandson Reportedly Killed In Mexico

Malcolm Shabazz, pictured in this 2006 photo posted on his blog, is said to have died Thursday at age 28.
Malcolm Shabazz

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 11:09 am

Malcolm Shabazz, the grandson of slain civil rights leader Malcolm X, has reportedly died at age 28. A family friend says Shabazz was killed Thursday in Mexico.

The news first appeared in New York's The Amsterdam News, after family friend Terrie Williams tweeted, "I'm confirming, per the U.S. Embassy, on behalf of the family, the tragic death of Malcolm Shabazz, grandson of Malcolm X."

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The Two-Way
10:27 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Criminal Probe Launched In Texas Fertilizer Plant Blast

The remains of the fertilizer plant that exploded in the town of West, Texas, on April 17.
Mike Stone Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 10:56 am

Authorities in Texas announced Friday that they're launching a criminal investigation into the April 17 fertilizer plant explosion that killed 15 people and devastated the small community of West.

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Interviews
10:12 am
Fri May 10, 2013

The 'Real Life' Of Actor Steve Carell

Steve Carell spent six years as Dunder Mifflin boss Michael Scott on NBC's The Office before departing the show in 2011.
Frazer Harrison Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 12:37 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 24, 2007.

By the end of The-40-Year-Old Virgin, the title character had lost his virginity — and actor Steve Carell had become a star.

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Interviews
10:12 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Rainn Wilson: 'The Office' Drone Outside Of Work

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 12:37 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on July 30, 2008.

While his Office character always took himself seriously, actor Rainn Wilson seems to be all about the laughs. For the entirety of the series, Wilson has played beet-farming, archery-loving middle-management kook Dwight Schrute on the NBC hit television series.

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Interviews
10:12 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Jenna Fischer: Keeping It Real At 'The Office'

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 12:37 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on June 3, 2008.

For nearly a decade, Jenna Fischer has played Pam, one of The Office's most recognizably real characters.

If you've ever worked in a clerical position in an alienating office, you'll relate to what Pam goes through. In this interview, Fischer tells Terry Gross about creating all those pained looks and knowing smiles — and about how her five years as an office temp helped to prepare her for the role.

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BackTalk
10:09 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Immigration Comments Touch Nerve With 'Diverse' Canadians

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for Back Talk. That's where we lift the curtain on what's happening in the TELL ME MORE blogosphere. Editor Ammad Omar is back with us. What's going on today, Ammad?

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Barbershop
10:09 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Does It Matter That 'Hero' Charles Ramsey Has A Criminal Past?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are writer and culture critic Jimi Izrael, with us in Washington, D.C.

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Politics
10:09 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Like 'Lazarus,' Mark Sanford Returns To Office

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, even for devoted Christians reading every word of the bible may be a once in a lifetime challenge. In a minute, we'll hear from a man who decided to copy the entire book by hand. And he tells us he's not even particularly religious. We'll think you'll be intrigued by what he has to say in a few minutes.

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The Salt
9:49 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Sago, An Ancient Chinese Starch, Endures In Asian Cooking

Pearls made from sago starch are common ingredients in Asian desserts and savories.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 1:14 pm

Long before rice became the mainstay of Asia, prehistoric people in China turned to sago palm for starch.

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The Two-Way
9:29 am
Fri May 10, 2013

'Monkeemobile' Creator Dean Jeffries Dies

Hey, hey: The Monkeemobile, one of Dean Jeffries best-known creations.
Steve Marcus Reuters/Landov

Dean Jeffries, the car customizer who created the "Monkeemobile" for The Monkees TV show, "Black Beauty" for The Green Hornet and who painted two famous words on actor James Dean's Porsche 550 Spyder, died last weekend at his Hollywood home. He was 80. A son says Jeffries died in his sleep.

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NPR Story
9:22 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Microexpressions: More Than Meets The Eye

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 11:23 am

David Matsumoto, a psychology professor at San Francisco State University, trains national security officials and police officers to recognize "microexpressions"--fleeting, split-second flashes of emotion across someone's face. Matsumoto says those subtle cues may reveal how an interview subject is feeling, helping officials to hone their line of questioning.

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