NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
10:27 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Criminal Probe Launched In Texas Fertilizer Plant Blast

The remains of the fertilizer plant that exploded in the town of West, Texas, on April 17.
Mike Stone Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 10:56 am

Authorities in Texas announced Friday that they're launching a criminal investigation into the April 17 fertilizer plant explosion that killed 15 people and devastated the small community of West.

Read more
Interviews
10:12 am
Fri May 10, 2013

The 'Real Life' Of Actor Steve Carell

Steve Carell spent six years as Dunder Mifflin boss Michael Scott on NBC's The Office before departing the show in 2011.
Frazer Harrison Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 12:37 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 24, 2007.

By the end of The-40-Year-Old Virgin, the title character had lost his virginity — and actor Steve Carell had become a star.

Read more
Interviews
10:12 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Rainn Wilson: 'The Office' Drone Outside Of Work

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 12:37 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on July 30, 2008.

While his Office character always took himself seriously, actor Rainn Wilson seems to be all about the laughs. For the entirety of the series, Wilson has played beet-farming, archery-loving middle-management kook Dwight Schrute on the NBC hit television series.

Read more
Interviews
10:12 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Jenna Fischer: Keeping It Real At 'The Office'

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 12:37 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on June 3, 2008.

For nearly a decade, Jenna Fischer has played Pam, one of The Office's most recognizably real characters.

If you've ever worked in a clerical position in an alienating office, you'll relate to what Pam goes through. In this interview, Fischer tells Terry Gross about creating all those pained looks and knowing smiles — and about how her five years as an office temp helped to prepare her for the role.

Read more
BackTalk
10:09 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Immigration Comments Touch Nerve With 'Diverse' Canadians

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for Back Talk. That's where we lift the curtain on what's happening in the TELL ME MORE blogosphere. Editor Ammad Omar is back with us. What's going on today, Ammad?

Read more
Barbershop
10:09 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Does It Matter That 'Hero' Charles Ramsey Has A Criminal Past?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are writer and culture critic Jimi Izrael, with us in Washington, D.C.

Read more
Politics
10:09 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Like 'Lazarus,' Mark Sanford Returns To Office

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, even for devoted Christians reading every word of the bible may be a once in a lifetime challenge. In a minute, we'll hear from a man who decided to copy the entire book by hand. And he tells us he's not even particularly religious. We'll think you'll be intrigued by what he has to say in a few minutes.

Read more
The Salt
9:49 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Sago, An Ancient Chinese Starch, Endures In Asian Cooking

Pearls made from sago starch are common ingredients in Asian desserts and savories.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 1:14 pm

Long before rice became the mainstay of Asia, prehistoric people in China turned to sago palm for starch.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:29 am
Fri May 10, 2013

'Monkeemobile' Creator Dean Jeffries Dies

Hey, hey: The Monkeemobile, one of Dean Jeffries best-known creations.
Steve Marcus Reuters/Landov

Dean Jeffries, the car customizer who created the "Monkeemobile" for The Monkees TV show, "Black Beauty" for The Green Hornet and who painted two famous words on actor James Dean's Porsche 550 Spyder, died last weekend at his Hollywood home. He was 80. A son says Jeffries died in his sleep.

Read more
NPR Story
9:22 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Microexpressions: More Than Meets The Eye

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 11:23 am

David Matsumoto, a psychology professor at San Francisco State University, trains national security officials and police officers to recognize "microexpressions"--fleeting, split-second flashes of emotion across someone's face. Matsumoto says those subtle cues may reveal how an interview subject is feeling, helping officials to hone their line of questioning.

NPR Story
9:22 am
Fri May 10, 2013

The Myth Of Multitasking

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 11:23 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Up next, we'll be focusing on you and your true love - your smartphone. Think about it. Are you lost without it? Inconsolable if the two of you are separated? Willing to walk into a lamppost rather than look up while texting? Is it the object of your desire? Isn't it?

Read more
NPR Story
9:22 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Exploring An Ever-Expanding Universe

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 11:23 am

Saul Perlmutter shared the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics for his discovery that the universe was expanding at an accelerating rate. Perlmutter explains how supernovae and other astronomical artifacts are used to measure the expansion rate, and explains what physicists are learning about "dark energy" — the mysterious entity thought to be driving the acceleration.

The Salt
8:18 am
Fri May 10, 2013

In The Land Of Wild Ramps, It's Festival Time

Ramps, or wild leeks, are a member of the lily family and resemble scallions with their wide leaves and small, white bulbs tinged a rusty red.
John Blankenship The Register-Herald

Springtime in Appalachia means ramp festival season. But even as ramp festivals attract record numbers of people seeking a fleeting taste of the seasonal garlic-scented greens, scientists warn that overharvesting is forcing wild populations into decline.

Read more
Shots - Health News
8:16 am
Fri May 10, 2013

It Came From Norway To Take On A Medical Goliath

Sometimes it's the hospital that gets the exam.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 5:37 am

Even if I hadn't known the hospital inspectors were coming, I would have figured it out quickly enough from my email.

The admonitions were flying:

"Know your safety protocols backwards and forwards!"

"Sign things legibly, or at the very least print your name below the signature."

"Wash your hands before and after patient contact. (The surveyors will be watching .... )"

It's boilerplate stuff that doctors like me should do all the time but often overlook.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:44 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Jacob & Sophia Rule Among Baby Names, Liz & Liam Are Hot

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 6:09 am

If this was a contest, some might call for the name Jacob to be retired after so many wins.

According to the Social Security Administration:

"Jacob and Sophia are repeat champions as America's most popular baby names for 2012. This is the fourteenth year in a row Jacob tops the list for boys and the second year for Sophia."

Rounding out the top 10 lists:

Girls / Boys

2. Emma / Mason

Read more
The Two-Way
7:28 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Spire Intact, World Trade Center Stretches To 1,776 Feet

One World Trade Center stands at its full height of 1,776 feet Friday, after a crane lifted its spire into place. The New York City skyline is seen here from the Heights neighborhood of Jersey City, N.J.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 9:32 am

With its glittering spire firmly attached, the new World Trade Center became the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere on Friday morning. The building at One World Trade Center now stands at 1,776 feet.

"It will give a tremendous indication to people around the entire region, and the world, that we're back and better than ever," Steven Plate, the head of construction at the World Trade Center, said last week when the spire was hauled to the top of the building.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:20 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Cleveland Kidnapping Suspect Could Face Thousands Of Charges

Ariel Castro during his arraignment Thursday at Cleveland Municipal Court. He's accused of kidnapping and raping three young women, and then holding a daughter born to one of those women captive. The women had been missing for about a decade. The child is now six years old.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 8:56 am

  • Brian Bull of WCPN reports

Update at 10:45 a.m. ET. DNA Testing Confirms Suspect Is Child's Father, Ohio Attorney General Says:

Preliminary DNA tests confirm that Ariel Castro, the man charged with kidnapping and repeatedly raping three young women held captive in his Cleveland home for about a decade, is the father of a girl born to one of the victims six years ago, Ohio's attorney general announced Friday morning.

A statement posted by Attorney General Mike DeWine's office says:

Read more
Politics
6:10 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Immigration Bill Remains Largely Intact After 1st Hearing

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Let's get an update now on one of this year's major policy debates. There is an immigration bill under consideration. The law, if passed, has the potential to be a major success story for President Obama and for the bipartisan group of lawmakers who drafted it. Opponents of the bill have major concerns about how it treats people who came to the U.S. illegally, and also about how much the law would cost.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:45 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Book News: Microsoft Rumored To Be Interested In Buying Nook

Microsoft already owns nearly a 17 percent stake in Nook Media.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 10:33 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:24 am
Fri May 10, 2013

FBI Says Data About Probe Of Bombing Suspect Was Shared

FBI Special Agent in Charge Richard DesLauriers (at the microphones), Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis (standing, at far left) and other authorities briefing the news media on April 19. That's the day Boston bombings suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev was killed and his brother, Dzhokhar, was captured.
Neal Hamberg Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:43 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Brian Naylor reports

Boston Police Chief Edward Davis told Congress on Thursday that before the Boston Marathon bombings, his department wasn't aware the FBI had questioned Tamerlan Tsarnaev in recent years about whether he had been in contact with Muslim extremists in Dagestan.

As far as he knew, Davis said, the FBI did not share that information with local authorities.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:20 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Sophia, Jacob Top Popular Baby Names List

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. The Social Security Administration has put out its list of the most popular baby names from last year. Topping the list for girls: Sophia. For boys, it's Jacob. As for fast rising contenders, Aria is becoming popular for girls. It seems parents are inspired by "Game of Thrones." Boys names gaining popularity: Major, King and Messiah.

A few other names of interest: David is hanging on at number 19, and Steve, where is Steve? Oh, 762.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's a little too exotic.

Around the Nation
5:17 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Florida Man Fleeing From Cops Attacked By Alligator

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:10 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Police in Pinellas County, Florida pulled over Bryan Zuniga at a traffic stop. The man ran away but his already bad day got worse, because as he fled he was attacked by an alligator. Police later arrested him at the hospital where he was being treated for his wounds. You may have seen those TV commercials, on for years, where a dog urges you to take a bite out of crime. This is not precisely what the crime dog meant, but close enough.

The Two-Way
5:09 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Reports: Survivor Rescued 17 Days After Bangladesh Building Collapse

Rescuers carry a survivor who was buried for 17 days under the rubble of a building that collapsed in Saver, near Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Parvez Ahmad Rony AP

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 11:25 am

(Most recent update: 1:15 p.m. ET.)

There's incredible news from Bangladesh:

"Miraculous as it may sound," a survivor was rescued Friday from the rubble of the eight-story building that collapsed 17 days ago near Dhaka, The Daily Star reported this morning.

That story from Bangladesh's English-language newspaper has been followed with these bulletins from other news outlets:

Read more
Business
3:43 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Cyber Criminals Drain $45 Million From ATMs Around The World

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right, prosecutors are calling it the biggest bank heist in New York City since the 1970s. They say a gang of cybercriminals drained $45 million from ATMs around the world.

Here's NPR's Joel Rose.

JOEL ROSE, BYLINE: United States Attorney Loretta Lynch says the eight men charged in New York were able to withdraw $2.8 million in cash in just one day, in February.

LORETTA LYNCH: This was a 21st century bank heist. But instead of guns and masks, this cybercrime organization used laptops and malware.

Read more
Middle East
3:43 am
Fri May 10, 2013

U.S. Point Man On Syria Meets With Rebels Inside Syria

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Read more
Research News
3:04 am
Fri May 10, 2013

What Does 'Sexual Coercion' Say About A Society?

One contemporary analysis links the increase in gender equality in a society with increased sexual empowerment of women and less sexual coercion. But there's more to it than that.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 9:46 am

Anthropologists, sociologists and biologists have explored over several decades many factors that shape the likelihood of sexual coercion of women by men.

Read more
All Tech Considered
1:17 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Peers Find Less Pressure Borrowing From Each Other

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:10 am

The Internet has managed to disrupt many industries, from publishing to music. So why not lending?

Google is teaming up with the nation's largest peer-to-peer lender. The search and tech giant is investing $125 million in Lending Club, which gets borrowers and lenders together outside the conventional banking system. Google's move and the actions of other big players reflect a growing interest in peer-to-peer lending.

Read more
Environment
1:16 am
Fri May 10, 2013

College Divestment Campaigns Creating Passionate Environmentalists

Students associated with the group Brown Divest Coal protested in front of the Brown University president's office during a rally May 3. The group is demanding that the university stop investing in certain oil and coal companies.
Courtesy of Brown Divest Coal

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 9:04 am

At about 300 colleges across the country, young activists worried about climate change are borrowing a strategy that students successfully used in decades past. In the 1980s, students enraged about South Africa's racist Apartheid regime got their schools to drop stocks in companies that did business with that government. In the 1990s, students pressured their schools to divest Big Tobacco.

This time, the student activists are targeting a mainstay of the economy: large oil and coal companies.

Read more
Food
1:13 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Unpacking Foreign Ingredients In A Massachusetts Kitchen

A kitchen renovation revealed some unusual items Laurel Ruma had picked up while traveling: chickpea flour, harissa and chia seeds.
Laurel Ruma

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:10 am

This is the second installment of NPR's Cook Your Cupboard, a food series about improvising with what you have on hand. Got a food that has you stumped? Submit a photo and we'll ask chefs about our favorites!

Laurel Ruma, an NPR listener from Medford, Mass., didn't realize quite how much she had gathered up from her travels until renovating her kitchen last summer. She unearthed things like harissa, chickpea flour and black chia seeds.

Read more
Planet Money
1:12 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Why (Almost) No One In Myanmar Wanted My Money

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 5:50 pm

When you arrive in Myanmar, you can see how eager the people are to do business. At the airport in Yangon, new signs in English welcome tourists. A guy in a booth offers to rent me a local cellphone — and he's glad to take U.S. dollars. But when I pull out my money, he shakes his head.

"I'm sorry," he says.

He points to the crease mark in the middle of the $20 bill. No creases allowed.

Read more

Pages