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Asia
11:53 am
Thu May 23, 2013

A Look Ahead To The Flash Point In The South China Sea

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 11:54 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Close to half of the world's maritime traffic passes through the South China Sea. Vast deposits of oil and natural gas are believed to lie beneath the ocean floor there. These waters are also the scene of bitter international rivalry as at least five smaller countries find themselves in lopsided disputes with China.

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National Security
11:48 am
Thu May 23, 2013

The President's Remarks On The Future Of National Security

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is special coverage from NPR News. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. In just a few minutes, President Obama will deliver what's described as a major address at the National Defense University here in Washington, D.C., a speech where he's expected to refocus strategy and tactics in the war against al-Qaida and its affiliates.

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Teen Pregnancies Continue To Decline, New Report Shows

New government figures add to evidence of a decline in teen pregnancies across the nation and point to a notably large drop in births among Hispanic teens, NPR's Jennifer Ludden tells our Newscast Desk.

She reports that the overall birth rate among teens is now half what it was at its peak, two decades ago, and that a new report from the National Center for Health Statistics shows:

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The Two-Way
10:07 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Amid Nails And Mud, Oklahoma Neighborhood Pulls Together

Homes in the Heatherwood subdivision of Moore, Okla., were splintered by the tornado that swept through the area Monday.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 8:24 am

Brian Hock was standing Wednesday evening in what used to be his home but is now 2,000 square feet of nothing. Still resting in a bag of dog food was the cup he uses to scoop kibble, emblazoned with the slogan "Fear not: God's love shines bright."

Hock was at work Monday when the tornado smashed his house in the Heatherwood subdivision of Moore, Okla. He says his daughters survived only because neighbors invited them to share a custom shelter.

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Movies
10:03 am
Thu May 23, 2013

'Epic' Movie Role For Music Superstar Pitbull

Pitbull's latest album is titled Global Warming, and he voices the character Bufo in the new movie Epic.
Christopher Polk Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 11:30 pm

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Arts & Life
10:03 am
Thu May 23, 2013

HBCU President Asks Dr. Dre, Why Not Us?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Moving on to other news in education, last week hip-hop mogul Dr. Dre and music producer Jimmy Iovine announced that they would be giving the University of Southern California $70 million to create a degree that will blend business, marketing, product development, design and liberal arts.

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The Salt
9:51 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Canned Peaches Are As Nutritious As Fresh. Really?

Canned peaches can pack as many, or in some cases, more nutrients than fresh ones, research suggests. But be sure to skip the added syrup.
Matthew Staver Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 11:14 am

I know, I know — I was incredulous, too.

But a new study published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture finds that canned peaches (yes, from the grocery store canned aisle) are as loaded with nutrients as fresh peaches. And in some cases, they pack more of a nutritional punch.

Take for instance, vitamin C: Researchers found almost four times more of it in canned than fresh peaches. In addition, canned had comparable levels of vitamin E and a lot more folate than fresh.

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Politics
9:32 am
Thu May 23, 2013

CBC Chair Marcia Fudge Wants Caucus To Be Heard On The Hill

Ohio Representative Marcia Fudge is still relatively new on the block. But she's established herself as the new head of the Congressional Black Congress. In the role, she's already been very vocal about whether the President is doing enough for people of color. Host Michel Martin talks with Congresswomen Fudge about her ideas for America.

Education
9:32 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Being Blind To Financial Need: Is It Worth It?

Millions of students rely on loans and grants for their studies. But with universities strapped for cash, fewer schools are able to admit students regardless of their financial need. Host Michel Martin asks the President of Iowa's Grinnell College, Dr. Raynard Kington, why his school considered putting a halt to need-blind admissions.

News
9:18 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Explore The Oklahoma Tornado Damage

NPR

Use this map of before-and-after aerial imagery to explore damage from the recent Oklahoma tornado — one of the most destructive storms ever recorded.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
9:15 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Production Of New Vehicles Predicted To Hit 2002 Levels

Strong new-vehicle retail sales figures have led analysts to predict North American production will reach 16 million units in 2013 — a mark not hit since 2002. Part of the rise is due to strong demand for pickup trucks.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 1:08 pm

Strong new-vehicle sales figures are causing industry analysts to revise their forecasts for North American production levels in 2013, with J.D. Power & Associates and LMC Automotive predicting 16 million units will be produced — a mark not hit since 2002.

More than 1,157,000 new vehicles are projected to be sold in May, the third month in a row to top the 1 million level. The growth is being helped by strong demand for full-sized pickups, which represent more than 11 percent of retail sales, according to a news release from J.D. Power.

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The Two-Way
8:58 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Reports: Obama To Limit Drones, Urge Action On Guantanamo

An American flag flying over Camp VI, where detainees are housed at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay.
Bob Strong Reuters /Landov
  • From 'Morning Edition': Dina Temple-Raston reports

Ahead of his much-anticipated speech Thursday afternoon at the National Defense University, there's word that President Obama:

Drones

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Parallels
8:39 am
Thu May 23, 2013

As Myanmar Reforms, Indonesia Offers Some Lessons

Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (right) walks with Myanmar's then-prime minister, Gen. Thein Sein, at the Presidential Palace in Jakarta on March 16, 2009. Both men are former military officers, leading their Southeast Asian nations along a sometimes rocky path to democracy.
Bay Ismoyo AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 7:48 am

As Myanmar's leaders push a series of political and economic changes, they are also having to deal with recent strife between the majority Buddhists and minority Muslims, or Rohingya.

Many countries making the transition from authoritarian rule to democracy have faced similar ethnic and sectarian conflicts, from Iraq to the former Yugoslavia.

But for Myanmar, perhaps the most compelling case study is also the closest.

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Shots - Health News
7:32 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Antidepressant May Protect The Heart Against Mental Stress

Researchers tested the antidepressant Lexapro, or escitalopram generically, to see if it would protect the heart against mental stress.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 12:12 pm

Stress can be a bummer for your heart. And, it seems, antidepressants may help some people with heart disease better weather that stress.

That's the intriguing suggestion from a study that tested how people with heart disease reacted when faced with challenging mental and social tests.

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The Two-Way
7:02 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Jobless Claims Drop, But Stay In Recent Range

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 8:20 am

There were 340,000 first-time claims for unemployment insurance last week, down 23,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration reports.

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The Two-Way
6:49 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Triple Murder May Link Tsarnaev And Man Killed In Florida

Ibragim Todashev, in an undated booking photo provided by the Orange County (Fla.) Corrections Department.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 2:18 pm

Ibragim Todashev, the 27-year-old man shot and killed after he allegedly attacked an FBI agent Wednesday in Orlando, may have been involved with Boston bombings suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev in a 2011 triple murder.

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The Two-Way
5:45 am
Thu May 23, 2013

'We Will Never Give In To Terror,' Britain's Cameron Vows

The victim: Drummer Lee Rigby.
U.K. Ministry of Defense

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 11:38 am

(Most recent update: 1:30 p.m. ET.)

One day after a British soldier was hacked to death on a busy southeast London street by two men who were heard claiming that they wanted to avenge the deaths of Muslims killed during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Prime Minister David Cameron declared Thursday that "we will never give in to terror or terrorism in any of its forms."

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The Two-Way
5:39 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Book News: Lydia Davis Wins Man Booker International Prize

Lydia Davis poses during a photocall in May for the finalists of the 2013 Man Booker International literary prize in London.
Will Oliver AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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World
5:25 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Octogenarian Rivals Race To Top Of Mount Everest

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Five years ago, at the age of 75, a Japanese mountaineer raced a 76-year-old Nepalese climber to the top of Mount Everest. Japan's Yuichiro Miura lost. This morning, in an epic rematch, the now 80-year-old Miura won, becoming the oldest person ever to reach the summit. But that record may not last. Next week, his Nepalese rival, at 81, plans to make the ascent again. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:19 am
Thu May 23, 2013

New Jersey Officials Wrap Up 'Operation Swill'

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene with a story of mistaken identity - at the bar. New Jersey officials have wrapped up an operation called Operation Swill that target bars who are trying to pull a fast one. They'll charge for good booze but actually pour the cheap stuff in your glass. They've caught 29 bars red-faced; 13 of those TGI Fridays. The operation involved confidential informants, gizmos to test out liquor, and more than 100 agents. I would say this was some top shelf police work.

Education
5:12 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Losers In Chicago School Closings Target Elected Officials

Protesters of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel's plan to close dozens of city schools rally in the Capitol rotunda in Springfield, Ill., on Wednesday. The Chicago Board of Education voted to close 50 schools.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 10:54 am

A day after school officials approved shutting down 50 schools, the Chicago Teachers Union and community activists say they'll hold a voter registration and education campaign. The union is agitated that Mayor Rahm Emanuel, school board members and some lawmakers failed to listen to parents, teachers and others who called for the schools to remain open.

Before they voted yes on the sweeping school closure plan, school board members faced a torrent of criticism Wednesday. Protesters tried to conduct a sit-in at the front of the boardroom, but security officers escorted them out.

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The Two-Way
4:41 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Funerals Begin In Tornado-Ravaged Moore, Okla.

Players, coaches and parents collected donations Wednesday in Oklahoma city for the Angle Family, who lost their daughter Sydney, and their home, in the tornado. Sydney was No. 35 on a softball team called 'Bring It'.
Katie Hayes Luke Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 10:44 am

Funerals began Thursday for the 24 people known to have been killed by the tornado that devastated Moore, Okla., on Monday.

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Movie Interviews
2:51 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Director Justin Lin Shifts The Identity Of 'Fast & Furious'

Justin Lin's first movie was Shopping for Fangs, which became a cult classic among Asian-American indie film fans.
Frazer Harrison Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 10:54 am

The movie Fast & Furious 6 hits theaters tomorrow. It is director Justin Lin's fourth film in the franchise, and is far different from his very first film, Shopping for Fangs, which starred a young John Cho and became a cult classic among Asian-American indie film fans.

Or is it so different?

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National Security
2:44 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Obama Speech Expected To Touch On Drones, Guantanamo

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

For months now, the Obama administration has promised to reveal more about America's secret drone program, and today could be the day. The president will speak this afternoon at the National Defense University, and he's planning to discuss America's fight against terrorism. He is expected to address everything from drones to the prison at Guantanamo Bay.

NPR's Dina Temple-Raston has this preview.

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Politics
2:38 am
Thu May 23, 2013

IRS Official's Silence Riles House Committee Members

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The IRS has admitted to targeting conservative groups seeking tax exempt status. And yesterday at a House hearing the IRS director of exempt organizations said, quote: "I have not done anything wrong." She then declined to testify. Lois Lerner's brief appearance at the committee was just the beginning of a stormy, five-hour session filled with angry outbursts and allegations of political motives.

NPR's Peter Overby reports.

PETER OVERBY, BYLINE: Lois Lerner did read a statement that she had done her job properly.

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It's All Politics
1:06 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Obama Group's Climate Push Puts President Under Scrutiny

President Obama speaks at Ellicott Dredges in Baltimore on May 17. The trip followed a visit by the company's president to Capitol Hill to testify in support of the Keystone XL pipeline. The White House says Obama's speech had nothing to do with Keystone, but environmental groups have been frustrated with his stance on the issue.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 10:54 am

Organizing for Action — a group that formed out of President Obama's re-election campaign — has posted five tweets in the past week about climate change using the @BarackObama Twitter account.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
1:05 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Living In Two Worlds, But With Just One Language

Elysha O'Brien and her husband, Michael, with their sons. Elysha never learned Spanish but is determined that her children will.
Courtesy of the O'Brien family

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 10:24 pm

NPR continues its conversations about The Race Card Project, where NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris asks people to send in six-word stories about race and culture. The submissions are personal, provocative and often quite candid.

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Law
1:05 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Sick Inmates Dying Behind Bars Despite Release Program

Nearly 30 years ago, Congress gave terminally ill inmates and prisoners with extraordinary family circumstances an early way out, known as compassionate release.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 10:54 am

Prison is a tough place, but Congress made an exception nearly 30 years ago, giving terminally ill inmates and prisoners with extraordinary family circumstances an early way out. It's called compassionate release.

But a recent investigation found that many federal inmates actually die while their requests drift through the system.

One of them was Clarence Allen Rice.

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Shots - Health News
5:47 pm
Wed May 22, 2013

Scientific Tooth Fairies Investigate Neanderthal Breast-Feeding

This model of a molar shows color-coded barium banding patterns that reveal weaning age.
Ian Harrowell, Christine Austin, Manish Arora Harvard School of Public Health

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 10:54 am

When it comes to weaning, humans are weird.

Our closest relatives, chimpanzees and gorillas, breast-feed their offspring for several years. Some baby orangutans nurse until they are 7 years old.

But modern humans wean much earlier. In preindustrial societies, babies stop nursing after about two years. Which raises the question: How did we get that way? When did we make the evolutionary shift from apelike parenting to the short breast-feeding period of humans?

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The Salt
4:24 pm
Wed May 22, 2013

In Raw Milk Case, Activists See Food Freedom On Trial

Supporters say Wisconsin farmer Vernon Hershberger's trial isn't just about raw milk: It's also, they say, about the right to get foods from farmers without government intervention.
Toby Talbot AP

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 3:59 pm

What is the case against Wisconsin farmer Vernon Hershberger really about? It depends on whom you ask.

To hear the prosecution, it's about licensing, not raw milk: Hershberger, a dairy farmer hailing from the town of Loganville, is on trial this week for operating without three licenses. He's also accused of continuing to sell raw milk to members of his private club after he was ordered not to.

If convicted, the father of 10 faces more than a year in jail and more than $10,000 in fines.

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