NPR News

Pages

Movie Interviews
11:55 am
Thu May 30, 2013

'Before Midnight,' Love Darkens And Deepens

Before Midnight is the third film in Richard Linklater's series that explores the romance and life of a couple, Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy). The two previous films were Before Sunrise and Before Sunset.
Sony Pictures Classics

In the 1995 Richard Linklater film, Before Sunrise, a young American man named Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and a young Frenchwoman named Celine (Julie Delpy) meet on a train from Budapest. Intrigued by one another, they get off the train together in Vienna and spend the night wandering the city, talking and falling in love, before they both return to their respective lives in their respective countries.

Read more
Parallels
11:33 am
Thu May 30, 2013

As The Clock Ticks, U.S. Forces Scale Back Afghan Goals

The gray line in the upper left comes from an aerial view of Afghanistan's crucial Highway 1, the main route between Kabul and Kandahar, the two biggest cities. U.S. forces are still working to secure the route which runs through lush farm valleys and the high desert terrain.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 4:15 pm

As the American military winds down its efforts in Afghanistan, grand plans for nation building are giving way to limited, practical steps: building up the Afghan forces and denying the Taliban key terrain, especially the approaches to Kabul.

About an hour south of the capital Kabul, one Green Beret team returned to a village where American forces had pulled out.

Lt. Col. Brad Moses, who was in the Sayed Abad district four years ago, wandered around the government center and expressed disappointment at the scene.

Read more
Shots - Health News
10:56 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Immigrants Subsidize, Rather Than Drain, Medicare

Patients wait in line at Nuestra Clinica Del Valle in San Juan, Texas, in September 2012 file photo. A study released on Wednesday finds that immigrants, particularly noncitizens, heavily subsidize Medicare, and that policies that restrict immigration may deplete Medicare's financial resources.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 6:42 am

As Congress mulls changing America's border and naturalization rules, a study finds that immigrant workers are helping buttress Medicare's finances.

Immigrants contribute tens of billions of dollars a year more than immigrant retirees use in medical services.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:54 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Texas Man To Serve 25 Years In Plot To Kill Saudi Ambassador

A 2001 photo shows Manssor Arbab Arbabsiar in a mug shot. Arbabsiar has been sentenced to 25 years in prison for plotting to kill Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the U.S.
Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 11:58 am

Manssor Arbabsiar, a naturalized U.S. citizen who has lived in Texas for three decades, has been sentenced to 25 years in prison for conspiring to kill Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the United States.

Last October, Arbabsiar pleaded guilty to plotting to kill the ambassador. He also admitted to working with Iranian military officials on the plan.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:53 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Another Letter Sent To The President Being Tested For Ricin

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 3:40 pm

A letter mailed to President Obama that is similar in some way to two possibly ricin-laced letters sent to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg was intercepted Thursday at a mail-handling facility, the Secret Service and other law enforcement authorities confirm.

Secret Service spokesman Brian Leary says in an email to NPR that:

Read more
The Two-Way
9:30 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Smelted In Space? Ancient Iron Beads Linked To Meteorite

The metal in an Egyptian iron bead dating from around 3,300 BC has been found to have originated from space, according to analysis. Here, the bead is seen in (clockwise from top left) a photograph, a CT cross-section view, a model of nickel oxides, and a model in which blue areas represent the rich presence of nickel inside the bead.
The Open University/University of Manchester

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 10:25 am

Since it was found in 1911, an Egyptian iron bead has sparked wonder and debate over how it was produced — made around 3,300 BC, it predates the region's first known iron smelting by thousands of years. Now, researchers say the iron was made in space and delivered to Earth via meteorite.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:19 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Priest, Author And Critic Rev. Andrew Greeley Dies

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 10:18 am

Rev. Andrew Greeley, who was a best-selling novelist as well as a liberal thinker known for "sometimes scathing critiques of his church," died Wednesday night in his sleep, The Chicago Tribune and other news outlets report. He was 85.

Read more
Shots - Health News
8:58 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Misplaced Blame On Childhood Ritalin For Later Substance Abuse

Would a Ritalin prescription for a child with ADHD in 1997 foretell a substance abuse problem for an adult today?
Robert Bukaty AP

People who had ADHD in childhood are more likely to problems with substance abuse as adults.

But there's been disagreement about whether treatment of ADHD with stimulant medications like Ritalin reduces that risk or makes future problems with alcohol, nicotine and illegal drugs more likely.

The latest look finds that young adults who took stimulants as kids were no more likely to have substance abuse problems later than those who had ADHD but didn't take stimulant drugs. It's the broadest and deepest analysis yet, but it still leaves many questions unanswered.

Read more
News
8:55 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Even Terrorists Have To Fill Out Expense Reports

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 10:30 am

Read more
Music Reviews
8:48 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Festival Au Desert: Music Of Peace Not Silenced By War

Tartit performs at the Festival au Desert.
Chris Nolan Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 7:20 am

Long ago, one of my college history professors hammered home a durable truth: "If you love art," she said, "you should hate war." Because some art is always among war's victims.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:47 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Assad Says Missiles Are There; Rebels Said To Balk At Talks

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 6:46 am

Update at 7 a.m. ET, May 31:

Since we first posted about the reports of what Syrian President Bashar Assad said regarding the delivery to his military of Russian anti-aircraft missiles, new reports have surfaced:

-- "Russian S-300 missiles unlikely to reach Syria for months." (Reuters)

Read more
The Two-Way
8:00 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Paterno Family To Sue NCAA To Reverse Sandusky Sanctions

The site in where a statue of former Penn State University football coach Joe Paterno once stood sits empty after it was removed last summer. The late coach's family is suing the NCAA to overturn sanctions against the school.
Patrick Smith Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 1:31 pm

The family of late football coach Joe Paterno has filed a lawsuit in Pennsylvania Thursday, seeking the reversal of NCAA sanctions against Penn State that resulted from the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal.

Update at 3 p.m. ET. Lawsuit Filed, Posted Online:

Read more
The Two-Way
7:39 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Tornadoes, Severe Storms Again Forecast For U.S. Midsection

Thursday's forecast: More storms across the nation's midsection.
National Weather Service

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 3:27 pm

Unfortunately, the forecasts have been pretty accurate in recent days. The National Weather Service warned there would be more tornadoes and severe storms on Wednesday — and there were.

Read more
Code Switch
7:10 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Arab-Americans: A 'Growing' Community, But By How Much?

Arab-Americans join in a traditional dance during the sixth annual Arab-American Heritage Festival in Brooklyn in 2011.
Robert Nickelsberg Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 7:53 am

One-and-a-half million Americans today claim Arab ancestry, according to a new Census Bureau report.

That's less than 1 percent of the total U.S. population.

Still, Maryam Asi, a demographer at the Census Bureau who co-wrote the report, says the Arab-American community is "growing," with a 76 percent increase since 1990 and 25 percent increase since 2000.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:04 am
Thu May 30, 2013

New Data Confirm The Economy Isn't Growing As Fast As Hoped

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 8:57 am

The U.S. economy grew at a 2.4 percent annual rate in the first quarter, the Bureau of Economic Analysis reported Thursday morning.

That basically confirms what the agency said a month ago, when it released its initial estimate for gross domestic product growth in the quarter. Then, it reported the economy had expanded at a 2.5 percent pace.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:23 am
Thu May 30, 2013

VIDEO: Miranda Lambert's Tears At 'Healing In The Heartland'

Miranda Lambert during her performance at Wednesday's Healing in the Heartland: Relief Benefit Concert in Oklahoma City.
Trae Patton/NBC Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 10:55 am

There were several emotional moments during Wednesday's nationally broadcast "Healing in the Heartland" benefit concert to raise money for victims of the May 20 tornado that devastated Moore, Okla., and nearby communities.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:43 am
Thu May 30, 2013

China's 'Pipe Baby' Out Of Hospital; With Mother's Family

"Baby 59," who survived being trapped in a sewer pipe, on Wednesday at the Pujiang People's Hospital.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 10:55 am

The newborn boy whose rescue from a sewer pipe in eastern China drew attention around the world earlier this week has been released from a hospital and is now in the care of his mother's family, according to media reports from Beijing.

There's also word that the mother will not be facing any charges. According to The Associated Press:

Read more
Around the Nation
5:31 am
Thu May 30, 2013

New Jersey Man Tries To Auction Off A Place In Heaven

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 12:51 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne, reporting there is no heaven on Earth, at least according to eBay. Seller Ari Mandel, formerly Orthodox Jewish, figured he'd done lot of good deeds and never worshipped false gods, so he would be a shoe-in for heaven. His offer on eBay reached $100,000 before the auction was shut down for violating eBay's policy against selling intangible things. This is MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
5:30 am
Thu May 30, 2013

FBI Pick Is A Republican With Deep Roots In Law Enforcement

President Obama is expected to nominate James Comey, seen in 2004, to be the next director of the FBI.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 11:13 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Carrie Johnson talks about James Comey

"Name any high office in federal law enforcement ... odds are Jim Comey's had it over the years."

That's some of what NPR's Carrie Johnson had to say early Thursday on Morning Edition about the man who she has been told, by two sources with knowledge of the decision, will be President Obama's choice to be the next director of the FBI.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:21 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Missing Senior Citizen Comes Home In Time For TV Deadline

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 6:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

A television news crew in Maine was reporting a story about a man who had gone missing. Seventy-three-year-old Robert McDonough suffers from dementia and had not been seen for more than 14 hours. As the TV reporter prepared to go live, standing outside McDonough's home, an elderly man wandered into the camera shot. The reporter said hello, then did a double take. Robert McDonough had returned home, safe and sound, just in time for the newscast.

The Two-Way
5:07 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Book News: Sci-Fi Author Jack Vance Dies At 96

Jack Vance wrote more than 60 books.
David M. Alexander

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
Animals
4:46 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Scientists Say Species Is Earliest Known Bird

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 6:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

You know what they say about the early bird? Well, a new species is vying for that title. Scientists have long-regarded an ancient creature, known as the Archaeopteryx, as the earliest bird known to science. But a discovery made in China could change that, according to a study published in Nature magazine. Scientists have found evidence of a feathered, chicken-sized species that's 10 million years older. It's called Aurornis xui, and it lived about 160 million years ago.

NPR Story
3:58 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Blackhawks Beat Wings, Will Meet Kings In NHL Conference Final

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 6:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As nail-biting hockey fans know well, there has been a lot of drama in this year's playoffs. Last night in the NHL, no different. The Chicago Blackhawks advanced to the semifinals with a thrilling Game 7 overtime win over the Detroit Red Wings.

Chicago had the best regular season record in the NHL this year. But as NPR's Mike Pesca reports, that doesn't mean much when your back is against the wall in an elimination game.

Read more
NPR Story
3:58 am
Thu May 30, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 6:19 am

Amazon asked subscribers of its video-streaming service to do the jobs usually left to focus groups and executives. The company released 14 pilot TV shows, then looked at customer reviews and view counts. Amazon announced five pilots have been approved for a full season.

NPR Story
3:58 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Rep. Michele Bachmann To Leave Congress

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 6:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Less than two years ago, Michele Bachmann's star seemed to be rising. The Republican congresswoman from Minnesota was full of energy and delighted her supporters - many in the Tea Party - when she announced she was running for president. Now, her presidential bid is being investigated. She won her congressional seat back - barely, and now she's announced she won't run again next year.

This has taken people by surprise, especially in her home district. Minnesota public radio's Conrad Wilson reports.

Read more
The Salt
1:07 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Will Chinese Firm Bring Home The Bacon With Smithfield Deal?

Smithfield Foods, makers of ham products under a variety of brand names, is being purchased by Chinese food maker Shuanghui International for $4.72 billion.
AP

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 7:38 am

There were questions Wednesday about whether U.S. regulators will approve the takeover of Smithfield Foods Inc., the company that sells all-American hams, hot dogs and bacon, by China's Shuanghui International.

Read more
The Salt
1:05 am
Thu May 30, 2013

GMO Wheat Found In Oregon Field. How Did It Get There?

Genetically modified wheat has been discovered growing in a field in Oregon. GMO wheat is not approved for sale in the U.S. Above, a wheat field in Arkansas.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 12:03 pm

A farmer in Oregon has found some genetically engineered wheat growing on his land. It's an unwelcome surprise, because this type of wheat has never been approved for commercial planting.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says it's investigating, trying to find out how this wheat got there. The USDA says there's no risk to public health, but wheat exporters are worried about how their customers in Asia and Europe will react.

Read more
Parallels
1:05 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Years Of Combat Experience, And Just Turning 20

Luis Bedoya is baby-faced and skinny.

And he looks ever the boy when he puts on an industrial-sized apron, thick gloves and a metal helmet - the tools of an apprentice welder at the Don Bosco center in this city in southern Colombia.

It's a big complex, complete with classrooms, basketball courts, a dormitory and work rooms. It's home to boys and girls, as well as very young adults, who defected from the FARC rebels or were captured by the Colombian army.

Read more
Parallels
1:03 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Palestinian Girls Look For Ways To Protest, Without Stones

Yusra Hammed, 15, puts the finishing touches on a drawing on a wall inside her family's home in Silwad, a village in the West Bank. Hammed says, like many Palestinian girls, she does not throw rocks at Israeli soldiers; but she expresses her opposition through alternate channels, such as art.
Emiliy Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 6:41 am

In the middle of the night a few weeks ago, 15-year-old Yusra Hammed watched Israeli soldiers arrest her brother Tareq. Two years older than Yusra, Tareq Hammed was among several Palestinian teenagers taken into custody that night, accused of throwing rocks at Israeli soldiers in their village, Silwad, in the occupied West Bank.

While he was being detained, his mother described him as a patriot.

"He wanted so badly to do as same what his father did, to defend his country," Suhaila Hammed said, sitting on a tawny gold couch in their home in Silwad.

Read more

Pages