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Middle East
2:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

'Conscience' of Syrian Revolution Faces Challenge from Islamists

Islamists from Jabhat al Nusra stage their own protest in the town. Until recently, the group has been reluctant to appear in public.
NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 4:00 pm

Kafr Nabl is surrounded by rocky hills covered with olive and fig trees. Located in northwest Syria near the Turkish border, it used to be a sleepy town of about 30,000 people. Then it rose up against the government in early 2011. More than a year later, the town was "liberated" by anti-government rebels who forced out soldiers and police who worked for the government.

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NPR Story
2:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Obama's Second Term Cabinet Nears Completion With New Nominations

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 3:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

Three new faces joined President Obama today at the White House.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Today, I'm announcing my plan to nominate three outstanding individuals to help us tackle some of our most important challenges.

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The Two-Way
2:38 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Listing The World's Billionaires: A Not-So-Exact Science

Two recent tallies of the world's richest people agree on the broad points — but not on which continent has the most billionaires. Here, U.S. dollars are counted, with Chinese yuan notes in the background.
STR AFP/Getty Images

There are more than 1,400 billionaires in the world right now, according to two sources — one in the U.S., and one in China. But the tallies by Forbes and Hurun Report differ on key points, including whether there are now more billionaires in Asia than anywhere else.

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The Two-Way
2:15 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Historic Election Day In Kenya Is Marred By The Killing Of 19

Voters line up in Kibera to vote. Long lines stretched over a mile long in some parts of Nairobi.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 3:16 pm

The historic presidential election in Kenya turned violent in two polling stations near the border with Somalia on Monday.

NPR's Gregory Warner reports from Nairobi that the attack marred what had been an otherwise peaceful day. He filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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Music Reviews
1:45 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Latin Gold In The Frozen North At Toronto's Lula Lounge

Lula Lounge: Essential Tracks." href="/post/latin-gold-frozen-north-torontos-lula-lounge" class="noexit lightbox">
Jane Bunnett's "Ron Con Ron" is featured on Lula Lounge: Essential Tracks.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 3:34 pm

For years, Canada has welcomed waves of newcomers from Latin America and the Caribbean. A thriving music scene has grown out of this migration — like the one at Lula Lounge, a nightclub in a working-class neighborhood of Toronto. The club's co-founder, Jose Ortega, cut his teeth in New York's legendary Latin scene. When he came to Toronto, he found the vibe fresher, more open to experimentation. And he found talent. It was just a matter of time before the country produced great Latin bands.

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The Two-Way
1:27 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Appeals Court Rules Arizona Day Labor Solicitation Law Is Unconstitutional

Day laborers wait on at a street corner in Tucson, Ariz., hoping for an employer to drive up and put them to work. The photograph was taken in 2008.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

The sweeping anti-immigration law passed by Arizona in 2010, received another buffet today: A panel of the the San Francisco-based U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals stood with a lower court, ruling that a ban on drivers soliciting day laborers violates the constitution's free speech guarantee.

Bloomberg News does a good job at laying out the legal issues in the case:

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Shots - Health News
1:22 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Best Defense Against Fire Ants May Be Allergy Shot Offense

The sting of Solenopsis invicta, the red imported fire ant, is well known to many in the Southern United States, but immunotherapy is possible.
Courtesy of Alex Wild

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 4:55 am

"Life-threatening fire ant attack" may sound like a B-movie script, but for people living in the Southern third of the United States, it's no joke.

These ant stings can cause deadly allergic reactions, but most people aren't getting the allergy shots that could save their lives, a new study says.

Fire ants sting people, just like bees do, and 2 to 3 percent of people are allergic to the ant's venom. But where bee stings are rare, fire ant stings are incredibly common for people who live in Texas and other Southern states.

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The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Napolitano: Airport Lines Have Seen '150 to 200 Percent' Increase Since Sequester

People wait in a security line at John F. Kennedy Airport on February 28, 2013 in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 4:50 pm

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano says the across-the-board spending cuts that went into effect on Friday are already causing headaches at the nation's airports.

"Now that we are having to reduce or eliminate basically overtime both for TSA and for customs, now that we have instituted a hiring freeze... we will begin today sending out furlough notices," Napolitano said, according to Politico.

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Economy
12:15 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

State Of Emergency: Cities In Financial Crisis

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 12:37 pm

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington; Neal Conan is away. Year by year, cities are raising fees and cutting public services to stay out of financial trouble. For some cities, that's just not enough. Detroit projects a $200 million deficit this year, and the city owes $14 billion in long-term obligations. The state's Republican Governor Rick Snyder says there's probably no city more financially challenged in the entire United States.

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The Picture Show
12:10 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Asylum Suitcases, Found And Photographed

Freda Bowker suitcase, part of the New York State Museum collection of suitcases from the Willard Asylum
Jon Crispin

Ed. Note: This article was originally published Nov. 2, 2011.

Photographer Jon Crispin has a fascination with things that are left behind. Those are his exact words. "Even as a kid I was trying to get into places I shouldn't go," he says on the phone.

In the '80s he was basically given free rein to document abandoned asylums in New York state. He has also worked closely and often with the New York State Museum, including on some Sept. 11 preservation projects.

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Opinion
12:09 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Op-Ed: There's An App For Everything, And That's A Problem

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 12:58 pm

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

And now for the Opinion Page. Technology has always promised to fix our imperfections. In this 1950s TV ad, G.E. swore that a new refrigerator-freezer combo would make a housewife's problems disappear.

(SOUNDBITE OF ADVERTISEMENT)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: We didn't have all this storage space in the door or conveniences like a butter conditioner, sliding shelves.

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Movie Reviews
11:53 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Cinerama Brought The Power Of Peripheral Vision To The Movies

A film still of New York City from 1952's This Is Cinerama. The film was meant to introduce audiences to the new Cinerama widescreen.
Flicker Alley LLC

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 12:51 pm

As early as silent film, directors attempted to create widescreen images. But in the 1950s it became a commercial necessity to give the multitude of new TV watchers what they couldn't get on a small screen. So even before CinemaScope, VistaVision, Todd-AO and Panavision, there was Cinerama — a process in which three projectors threw three simultaneous images onto a gigantic curved screen. Cinerama offered what no TV or movie screen could provide before — peripheral vision, which could make you feel as if you were really in the midst of the action.

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The Two-Way
11:42 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Retirement Home Defends Nurse's Refusal To Administer CPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 11:58 am

The head of a California retirement home where a nurse last week refused to administer CPR to an elderly woman says his staff followed policy in handling the emergency.

In a written statement, Jeffrey Toomer, the executive director of Glenwood Gardens in Bakersfield, Calif., says it is the facility's practice "to immediately call emergency medical personnel for assistance and to wait with the individual needing attention until such personnel arrives. ... That is the protocol we followed."

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Movie Interviews
11:40 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Mike White On Creating HBO's 'Enlightened' Whistle-Blower

In HBO's Enlightened, Laura Dern stars as corporate executive Amy Jellicoe, who returns from a post-meltdown retreat to pick up the pieces of her broken life. Series creator Mike White stars as Tyler, Amy's friend and co-worker.
Lacey Terrell HBO

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 12:51 pm

The HBO series Enlightened wrapped up its second season Sunday night. The show began as the story of a woman — the naive, idealistic, manipulative, determined and sincere Amy Jellicoe, played by Laura Dern — trying to put her life back together in the wake of a breakdown. After spending a couple of months at a New Age recovery center in Hawaii, Amy attempts to apply what she has learned to her life back in the real world of corporate America.

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Politics
11:02 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Obama Announces His Picks For EPA, Other Cabinet Posts

President Obama rounds out his Cabinet for his second term, nominating three new leaders Monday: Walmart Foundation's Sylvia Mathews Burwell for budget chief, MIT scientist Ernest Moniz to head the Energy Department and veteran regulator Gina McCarthy to run the EPA — a post that's likely be a lightning rod during Senate confirmations.

The Two-Way
10:27 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Reports: Snipers Deployed To Kill Tehran's Cat-Sized Rats

Rats aren't only problem in Tehran. These were running free over the weekend in Luton, England.
Barcroft Media Barcroft Media /Landov

Rats have been a problem for many years in Tehran. As the BBC reported in 2000, officials back then launched a poison control program that they hoped would kill many of the estimated 25 million rats in the city.

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The Two-Way
10:06 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Czech Parliament Impeaches Outgoing President Over Amnesty

President of the Czech Republic Vaclav Klaus.
Ferenc Isza AFP/Getty Images

Czech President Vaclav Klaus is due to leave office this week. But, today, the country's upper house of Parliament handed him quite a going-away gift: They impeached him for treason and referred his case to the Constitutional Court.

Reuters reports that his left-wing opponents are angry because he granted amnesty to thousands of prisoners. The court will decide whether those pardons violated the constitution

Reuters adds:

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Business
9:58 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Yahoo: A Telecommunication Breakdown?

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 11:51 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, it's been called a landmark in the American literary canon. Certainly it's one of the premier works of Chicano literature. Now it's finally made its way to the big screen. We are going to speak with its star, herself a well-loved pioneer among Latina actresses. Her name is Miriam Colon and she's with us in just a few minutes to tell us about "Bless Me, Ultima."

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Politics
9:58 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Sequestions And Answers

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 11:51 am

Lawmakers failed to avert across-the-board spending cuts to the federal government, and they officially kicked in last week. Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax, and The Wall Street Journal's Sudeep Reddy about what it all really means.

Radio Expeditions
9:58 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Wealth Gap: Wide And Getting Wider

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 11:51 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to talk now about new research on the wealth gap between white and black families in the U.S. According to a federal survey, the median black family has five cents for every dollar of wealth owned by their white counterparts. Now, that gap is obviously very large, but it is also growing. We wanted to talk more about this, so we've called Washington Post reporter Michael Fletcher, who wrote about this recently. And he's with us from The Washington Post's studios.

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Shots - Health News
9:19 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Mouse Study Sheds Light On Why Some Cancer Vaccines Fail

A simple switch of ingredients made a big difference in how mice responded to experimental cancer vaccines.
Andrei Tchernov iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 12:31 pm

In the quest for better cancer medicines, vaccines that treat rather than prevent disease are getting lots of attention.

More than 90 clinical trials have tested therapeutic vaccines in cancer patients, but the results have been a mixed bag.

A recent study in mice suggests that changing a traditional ingredient in the vaccines could make a big difference.

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The Two-Way
9:10 am
Mon March 4, 2013

French Commander Cautious About Al-Qaida Leaders' Deaths

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 10:10 am

There's uncertainty over the supposed death of two top al-Qaida-affiliated leaders reportedly killed in West Africa.

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The Two-Way
8:39 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Obama Taps Nominees For EPA, Budget Office And Energy Department

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:36 pm

Calling them "three outstanding individuals" who will help him tackle some tough problems, President Obama on Monday morning nominated:

-- Gina McCarthy, currently an assistant administrator at the Environmental Protection Agency, to lead that agency. She would succeed the departed Lisa Jackson.

-- Ernest Moniz to be the next secretary of energy, replacing Steven Chu, who like Jackson decided not to stay for Obama's second term. Moniz is director of MIT's Energy Initiative and is a former undersecretary at the department.

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Today's 'Harlem Shake' Report: 15 Aussie Miners Fired; 'The Simpsons' Joins In

The "Harlem Shake" has certainly gone global. Sunday in Lausanne, Switzerland, these folks joined in.
Christian Brun EPA /LANDOV

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The Two-Way
7:52 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Queen Elizabeth II Leaves Hospital

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II as she left King Edward VII hospital in London on Monday.
Bogdan Maran EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:24 am

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II was just seen leaving London's King Edward VII hospital, where she had been admitted over the weekend to be treated for symptoms of gastroenteritis.

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The Two-Way
7:38 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Dennis Rodman's Take On The North Korean Regime

"This Week" host George Stephanopoulos interviews former NBA star Dennis Rodman, just back from a visit to North Korea.
Lorenzo Bevilaqua Associated Press

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 9:06 am

If former NBA star Dennis Rodman's read on Kim Jong Un is correct, the CIA and State Department might be in need of a major overhaul in their assessments of the North Korean leader.

Rodman, the only American to have met and talked with Kim, appeared on ABC's This Week with George Stephanopoulos to talk about his two-day visit to North Korea last week.

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The Two-Way
7:08 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Prayers, Oaths Of Secrecy As Catholic Cardinals Meet

Some of the cardinals as they arrived for today's meeting in Vatican City.
Claudio Peri EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 9:35 am

As they begin the process that will lead to selection of the next pope, the Roman Catholic Church's cardinals must first decide just when to officially start deciding, NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reminds us from Rome this morning.

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The Two-Way
6:31 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Heartbreak In NYC: Parents Die In Crash; Baby Is Delivered But Later Dies

Mourners lined the street Sunday outside a synagogue in Brooklyn where funeral services were held for Raizy and Nathan Glauber.
Verena Dobnik AP

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 9:04 am

A young couple head to a hospital because the wife, who is about seven months pregnant, isn't feeling well. Then, tragedy strikes.

It's a heartbreaking story that is making headlines in New York City.

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Religion
5:56 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Cardinals At Odds Over When To Begin Choosing Next Pope

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 11:02 am

The College of Cardinals is holding its first official meetings at the Vatican on Monday. The top agenda item is choosing which day to start the closed-door conclave that will elect the new pope. With no clear front-runner, the conclave outcome is unpredictable.

The papal resignation has put the cardinals in an unprecedented situation in modern history.

"The real mood is of shock and disappointment — this resignation desacralized the figure of the pope," says Massimo Franco, author of several books about the Vatican. He says a pope cannot be treated like a company CEO.

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The Two-Way
5:40 am
Mon March 4, 2013

At Florida Sinkhole, Demolition Continues

In Seffner, Fla., on Sunday, demolition crews and firefighters watched as a crane operator worked to bring down the home where a man was sucked into a sinkhole last week.
Scott Audette Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:54 am

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