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Political Crisis In Egypt
1:48 am
Tue July 9, 2013

What Egyptian State TV Says About The State Of Egypt

In an image from a video broadcast on Egyptian state TV, President Mohammed Morsi addresses the nation on July 2 — his final speech before the military deposed him.
Ismael Mohamad UPI /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:23 am

It sounded like a slip of the tongue. As millions of Egyptians took to the streets calling for President Mohammed Morsi to step down, state TV anchor George Heshmat casually used the word "revolution" instead of "protests."

This signaled that state TV was beginning to assert its independence from a government that was never a good fit for it anyway. It was clear that something had changed at the voice of the state — even before Morsi was pushed from power.

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Games & Humor
1:43 am
Tue July 9, 2013

A Zombie Horror Game, Inspired By ... A Nature Documentary?

In The Last of Us, a fungus called Cordyceps that commonly infects insects has jumped over to humans, creating a fungal zombie apocalypse.
Naughty Dog

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 9:20 am

The Last of Us is a new survival horror video game and it features — no big surprise — zombie-like creatures. But these are not the same old zombies that have dominated movie and TV screens in the past few years.

Neil Druckmann, creative director for The Last of Us, says he wanted a fresh new way to wipe out humanity — and he found it in a BBC documentary series called Planet Earth, which depicts the scary effects of the Cordyceps fungus.

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U.S.
1:42 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Employers Face Changes After Same-Sex-Marriage Ruling

The Supreme Court's decision striking down the Defense of Marriage Act will bring changes to retirement plans, health care and other benefits.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:45 am

There are an estimated 225,000 Americans in legally recognized same-sex marriages. The Supreme Court's recent ruling striking down a key provision of the Defense of Marriage Act means they are now eligible for the same federal benefits as straight couples.

Many of those benefits touch the workplace, and employers are beginning to think about the changes they will have to make.

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The Salt
1:40 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Why There Are Too Few Cooks For New York City's Elite Kitchens

A view inside the kitchen at chef Peter Hoffman's farm-to-table restaurant, Back Forty West, in New York's Soho neighborhood.
Simon Doggett Flickr

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 3:10 pm

New York City has long been considered the nation's epicenter for all things culinary. The borough of Manhattan had more than 6,000 restaurants at last count. And the city has the most three-star Michelin-starred restaurants in the country — closing in on Paris.

But lately, some cooks have begun to go elsewhere to make names for themselves.

Among the reasons for the culinary exodus: Chefs' obsession with local ingredients is making smaller communities a lot more appealing.

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The Salt
1:39 am
Tue July 9, 2013

As Biotech Seed Falters, Insecticide Use Surges In Corn Belt

Crop consultant Dan Steiner inspects a field of corn near Norfolk, Neb.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 12:56 pm

Across the Midwestern corn belt, a familiar battle has resumed, hidden in the soil. On one side are tiny, white larvae of the corn rootworm. On the other side are farmers and the insect-killing arsenal of modern agriculture.

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Monkey See
1:38 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Pedal Power To Horsepower: Toys Point Toward Future Of Cars

Mark Takahashi is now one of the "car people" at Edmunds.com — but at the age of 2, the future automotive editor, like his co-worker Mike MaGrath, was more of a toy-car person.
Courtesy Mark Takahashi

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 9:46 am

Morning Edition has reported that the Toyota Camry is the best-selling car in the U.S., and the Ford Focus is the world's best-seller.

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Shots - Health News
1:37 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Treating The 'Body And Soul' In A Russian TB Prison

An inmate practices for the yearly talent show in the prison's concert hall. Such cultural activities are part of the hospital's treatment, which combines correction with education, medical and psychological therapy.
Konstantin Salomatin/for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:41 am

Igor Davydenko is rail-thin with dark circles under his eyes. He has a haunted look, reinforced by black prison overalls with reflective tape on the shoulders and cuffs.

Davydenko could be labeled as a loser in many ways. The 31-year-old is a drug addict, serving time for robbery and assault. He's serving his third stretch in a Siberian prison.

But Davydenko is about to become a winner in at least one way. If all goes well, he will soon be declared cured of one of the deadliest forms of tuberculosis.

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The Two-Way
12:52 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Video: 3 Kidnapped Cleveland Women Say 'Thank You'

Amanda Berry shown in YouTube video.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:32 am

For the first time, the three women held captive in Cleveland for more than a decade have broken their public silence by releasing a thank you video on YouTube. It was posted at midnight.

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The Two-Way
4:12 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Death Toll Rises To 13 In Quebec Train Explosion

The death toll has been raised to 13 in a freight train's derailment and explosion in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, this past weekend.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:50 am

Police in a small town in Quebec, Canada, where a runaway freight train holding crude oil caused a massive explosion, say they have found the bodies of eight more victims, bringing the death toll in Saturday's incident to 13. The authorities say dozens of people are still unaccounted for.

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It's All Politics
4:06 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

With An Eye Toward 2016, Rick Perry Reboots

Texas Gov. Rick Perry announces he will not seek re-election as governor, Monday in San Antonio.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 4:37 pm

Picture the next 18 months of Republican Texas Gov. Rick Perry's road to national relevance.

Appearances on the late-night comedy shows, where he'll banter with Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, Jay Leno, maybe even Jimmy Fallon.

A rolling, cross-country road show during which he'll tout the Texas economy and charm grassroots voters and deep-pocketed donors.

Mixing it up back home in Austin with intensifying battles to limit legal abortion and push back against "Washington policies."

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Around the Nation
3:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

How Many Gay Couples Have Tied The Knot? Nobody Knows

Couples kiss at the Old Orange County Courthouse in Santa Ana, Calif., earlier this month.
Amy Taxin AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

Since the Supreme Court struck down the federal Defense of Marriage Act in June, many questions have emerged about what the ruling may mean for same-sex couples.

There's one question, though, that would seem easy to answer: How many legal same-sex marriages are there in the U.S.?

The Limitations Of Self-Reporting

It turns out the answer is actually very complicated — so complicated that even experts such as Bob Witeck, president and founder of Witeck Communications, a marketing firm specializing in gay and lesbian consumers, are stumped.

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Shots - Health News
3:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Insurance Pitch To Young Adults Started In Fenway Park

Fans take in the view of the outfield at Denver's Coors Field as the San Diego Padres face the Colorado Rockies in June.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:45 am

The Major League Baseball season is now half over, and some fans are already starting to think about the World Series in October.

October is also a big month for the Obama administration.

That's when millions of Americans can start signing up for new health insurance policies through health exchanges established in each state under the Affordable Care Act.

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Music Reviews
3:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

On Two New Albums, A Modern-Minded Brass Band Cuts Loose

Virginia's No BS! Brass Band adopts and ultimately expands the brass-band tradition.
PJ Sykes Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

Brass bands often bring New Orleans to mind. But some 1,000 miles away from southeast Louisiana, there's a different kind of brass band at work: the No BS! Brass Band of Richmond, Va.

Since the late 1970s, the brass-band repertoire has morphed into a new sound with the addition of funk, hip-hop and post-bop jazz. With as many as 13 members, No BS! Brass Band picks up on — and expands — that new tradition.

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U.S.
3:02 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

In The World Of Air Travel, Not All Passengers Created Equal

Only a few of these passengers will be able to get flights out of San Francisco, depending on how many miles they fly and their "value" to the airline.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

When Asiana Flight 214 from South Korea crashed onto the runway at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday, hundreds of flights into that airport were canceled, stranding thousands of travelers at airports across the country.

The Asiana crash came right in the middle of a holiday weekend, disrupting airline networks. And it occurred during a weekend when many flights were intentionally overbooked.

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The Salt
2:35 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

France Battles Scourge Of Ready-To-Eat Meals In Restaurants

We're guessing microwavable, premade meals are not an issue in this kitchen, at the three-Michelin-star restaurant L'Auberge du Pont de Collonges near Lyon, France.
Laurent Cipriani AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 12:47 pm

France's vaunted culinary culture has been taking it on the chin lately.

First came the news, which we told you about in April, that the majority of France's restaurants are now fast-food joints.

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NPR Story
2:15 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Abundance Of Elephants Strains South African Game Reserves

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In many parts of Africa, elephants are threatened by poaching. But in South Africa, they're doing so well that some game reserves say they're overpopulated. Now, many of those reserves are trying to limit elephant reproduction even while some ecologists believe it's the wrong approach. Willow Belden reports.

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NPR Story
2:15 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Book Review: 'Skinner'

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Charlie Huston is a Los Angeles-based writer known for his superhero comic books and crime novels. Alan Cheuse couldn't wait to get his hands on Huston's latest thriller called "Skinner." Here's his review.

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NPR Story
2:15 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

NSA Leaks Focus New Attention On Government Contractors

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Edward Snowden, the man who leaked top-secret NSA documents, predicted a month ago that the U.S. government would accuse him of committing grave crimes. That comment came in a video released today by The Guardian newspaper. At the time he disclosed the secret information, Snowden was an employee of a private firm Booz Allen Hamilton.

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Shots - Health News
1:53 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Youths At Risk Of Violence Say They Need Guns For Protection

A young neighbor watches as police respond to a double homicide in Flint, Mich., on June 30. Organizations including the Michigan Youth Violence Prevention Center are working to help young people choose non-violent solutions to conflict.
Michelle Tessier MLIVE.COM /Landov

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:21 pm

Public health efforts to reduce the number of children and teenagers killed by guns got a big boost in visibility after the tragic killing of children at Sandy Hook Elementary School last fall.

Each week about 50 children and teens are shot and killed in the United States, with homicide the second leading cause of death among teenagers here, behind car crashes.

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The Two-Way
1:47 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Asiana Crash: Plane Was 34 Knots Below Target Speed, NTSB Says

National Transportation Safety Board head Deborah Hersman speaks at a news conference in San Francisco on Monday.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 4:59 pm

Three seconds before it struck the ground Saturday, the speed of Asiana Airlines Flight 214, a Boeing 777, was 103 knots — the lowest measured by its data recorders, and far below the target speed of 137 knots, says National Transportation Board Chairman Deborah Hersman.

The crash-landing at San Francisco International Airport left two passengers dead and more than 180 people injured, as Mark reported for The Two-Way this morning.

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Parallels
1:43 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Pakistan: 'Collective Failure' Allowed Bin Laden To Hide

This undated image from video, seized from the walled compound of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad, Pakistan, and released by the U.S. Department of Defense on May 7, 2011, shows bin Laden watching President Obama on television.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 9:22 am

The "collective failure" of Pakistan's military and spy authorities allowed al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden to live in multiple places in the country for nearly a decade. That's the finding of a confidential Pakistani government report published Monday by Al Jazeera.

The 336-page report said officials in the Pakistani government, military, intelligence and security agencies did not know that bin Laden lived in the country.

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Music News
1:28 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Modern Hymn Writers Aim To Take Back Sunday

Modern hymn writers Kristyn and Keith Getty run through their song "In Christ Alone" at their home near Nashville's Music Row.
Courtesy of Stephen Jerkins

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 9:35 am

There was a time when hymns were used primarily to drive home the message that came from the pulpit. But then came the praise songs.

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The Salt
1:03 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The (Knockoff) Cronut

New York gave Chicago "the cronut," just as Chicago gave New York "Kanye West."
NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:13 pm

By now, you've probably heard of cronuts, the half-doughnut, half-croissant pastry equivalent of a liger. They're so coveted, people line up for hours at the Dominique Ansel bakery in New York, where they're made, or they pay exorbitant sums on the cronut black market.

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All Tech Considered
12:45 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Arrest Caught On Google Glass Reignites Privacy Debate

Filmmaker Chris Barrett wearing his Google Glass. He is among the first 1,000 nondeveloper testers of the product.
Jennifer Rubinovitz Courtesy of Chris Barrett

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

The Fourth of July holiday brought about another first for Google Glass, the computing device that you can wear on your face.

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The Two-Way
12:29 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Gov. Rick Perry Says He Won't Seek Re-Election In Texas

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 5:01 pm

Texas Gov. Rick Perry says he will not run for re-election in 2014, feeding speculation that he might again pursue the presidency as a Republican candidate in the 2016 race.

The governor made his announcement at a news conference Monday in San Antonio, which was carried live online by The Texas Tribune.

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Snowden: Americans Are Good; But Their Leaders Lie

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA /LANDOV

When he went to work for the nation's spy agencies, "I believed in the goodness of what we were doing" and in the "nobility of our intentions to free oppressed people overseas," says the so-called NSA leaker, Edward Snowden, in a month-old video posted online Monday by The Guardian.

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Parallels
11:59 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Reversing Direction, Some Syrian Refugees Now Head Home

Refugees at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan try to squeeze on one of the buses heading back to Syria. Syrian refugees have been coming to Jordan for two years, but some are now starting to head home.
Peter Breslow NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:36 am

In the Jordanian desert, the chaos begins at sundown, when the wind whips up the desert sand and the buses arrive. For the past two years, Syrian refugees have been streaming into Jordan, and they now number an estimated half million.

But for the past month, more refugees have returned to Syria than entered Jordan, and hundreds are leaving daily from Zaatari, the U.N.'s largest refugee camp in Jordan.

"Four buses are going every day," says Kilian Kleinschmidt, who runs Zaatari. "Depending on how many people manage to storm the buses, it's probably 300 to 400 people."

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Mon July 8, 2013

A 'Mea Culpa'

Nina Totenberg
Steve Barrett NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 11:53 am

I have always believed in correcting mistakes, especially bad ones. In my wrap-up piece at the end of the Supreme Court term, I quoted Northwestern University law professor John McGinnis as one of several conservative scholars highly critical of the court's decision on the Voting Rights Act.

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The Two-Way
11:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Boy Writes To NASA; NASA Writes Back

A boy's letter to NASA is making waves and softening hearts on the Internet today.
imgur

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 4:53 pm

Not many children write letters to government entities, we would think. But a boy's letter to NASA is making waves and softening hearts on the Internet today.

"Dear NASA," the letter begins. "My name is Dexter I heard that you are sending 2 people to Mars and I would like to come but I'm 7." The handwritten note, in which Dexter asks for advice about becoming an astronaut, got a full response from NASA, along with some stickers and posters.

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The Two-Way
11:37 am
Mon July 8, 2013

At Murder Trial, Friends Say It's Zimmerman's Voice On Tape

George Zimmerman in a Sanford, Fla., courtroom on Monday.
Joe Burbank/pool Getty Images

The key takeaway from Monday morning's testimony at the trial of George Zimmerman for the shooting death of Trayvon Martin is that the defense produced three people to say they're convinced it is Zimmerman's voice that can be heard calling for help on the recording of a 911 call.

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