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Africa
10:04 am
Tue July 30, 2013

After 3 Decades Of Mugabe, Could Zimbabwe Get A New Leader?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, Detroit's bankruptcy last week made headlines because it was the biggest in history, but now comes the question of why this happened and what, if anything, this means for other American cities. We'll hear two very different views about this in just a few minutes. But first, we want to turn to two significant elections in Africa this week. The West African country of Mali is being praised for a smooth presidential vote this past weekend.

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Law
10:04 am
Tue July 30, 2013

What's Behind Falling Incarceration Rates?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, we'll talk about elections set for Zimbabwe, where 89-year-old President Robert Mugabe is hoping to win yet another term despite - or maybe because of - what many people call an increasingly abusive dictatorial style of government. We'll talk about that in just a few minutes. But first, we want to talk about an issue that's become a central focus of activists in this country - it's the incarceration rate.

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All Tech Considered
9:24 am
Tue July 30, 2013

In The Digital Age, The Family Photo Album Fades Away

In the future, a hard drive full of photographs may serve as the digital analog of a pile of old pictures.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 12:42 pm

Once upon a time, parents documented their kids' firsts in words and pictures in baby books and scrapbooks that got updated as life's big milestones got reached. Family photo albums grew thick with memories of trips, holidays, friends and relatives.

But who has time for that? I have two kids, thousands of pictures of them and a bunch of well-meaning, half-finished photo book projects littering my house and computer.

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The Two-Way
9:19 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Obama Meets With Mideast Negotiators

Secretary of State John Kerry leaves the West Wing of the White House with chief negotiators, Israeli Justice Minister Tzipi Livni (back to camera), Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat (right) and others, after a meeting with President Obama on Tuesday.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 6:48 am

President Obama personally met with Israeli and Palestinian negotiators, this morning, a White House official tells NPR's Ari Shapiro.

The official called it a "quick check-in," but this is significant because Obama — at least publicly — has largely stayed out of the process, instead letting Secretary of State John Kerry take the lead.

Haaretz reports that Obama called on the negotiators to "exhibit good will and to remain focused and steadfast throughout the talks."

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The Two-Way
9:08 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Home Prices Rose In May; Consumer Confidence Dips

Home prices increased during May in the S&P/Case-Shiller 20 City Home Price Index.
Jae C. Hong ASSOCIATED PRESS

Home prices continue to rise, according to the latest numbers in the S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Index. Home prices were up 12.2 percent in May from a year ago.

S&P/Case-Shiller's closely watched 20-city index found the average price of a home climbed 2.4 percent in May compared with April. The city with the biggest average monthly gain was San Francisco, where home prices jumped 4.3 percent.

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The Two-Way
8:58 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Defense Workers' Furlough Days May Be Cut

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 9:36 am

The number of furlough days for civilian workers at the Department of Defense may be cut nearly in half, according to The Associated Press, a result of Pentagon officials finding hundreds of millions of dollars in savings within their current budgets.

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The Two-Way
7:58 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Taliban Attack Frees At Least 175 From Pakistani Prison

Pakistani policemen stand outside the central prison after an overnight attack in Dera Ismail Khan. Officials say Taliban insurgents freed hundreds of prisoners, including hard-line militants.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 9:25 am

Scores of prisoners were freed from a prison in northwestern Pakistan on Tuesday, after Taliban militants armed with explosives and automatic weapons reportedly stormed the facility. At least nine people, including five guards, died in gun battles and other violence at the prison, according to multiple news outlets.

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Shots - Health News
7:01 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Doctors Increasingly Ignore Evidence In Treating Back Pain

Unfortunately, that CT scan probably won't help.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 10:18 am

The misery of low back pain often drives people to the doctor to seek relief. But doctors are doing a pretty miserable job of treating back pain, a study finds.

Physicians are increasingly prescribing expensive scans, narcotic painkillers and other treatments that don't help in most cases, and can make things a lot worse. Since 1 in 10 of all primary care visits are for low back pain, this is no small matter.

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The Two-Way
6:45 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Egypt's Ousted President Morsi Is 'Well,' Says EU Official

Egyptian supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi demonstrate against the military-backed government in Cairo. Morsi, who has been detained since July 3, is in good health, a European official says.
Fayez Nureldine AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 8:33 am

After a long talk with ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, European Union Foreign Policy Chief Catherine Ashton says Morsi, who has been detained for nearly a month, is in good health.

"We talked for two hours; we talked in-depth. He has access to information, in terms of TV, newspapers — so, we were able to talk about the situation," Ashton tells the BBC. "And we were able to talk about the need to move forward."

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The Two-Way
6:04 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Suspected Nazi War Criminals Living In Limbo In U.S.

John (Ivan) Kalymon talks about his deportation outside his Troy, Mich., home in this 2009 photo. Kalymon is one of at least 10 suspected Nazi war criminals who remains in the United States despite attempts to deport him.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 12:38 pm

At least 10 people suspected of committing Nazi war crimes were never deported from the U.S. despite losing the American citizenship they gained when they immigrated, The Associated Press reports. A main cause of the delay is simple: Their European homelands don't want them back.

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The Two-Way
5:24 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Book News: Campaigner For Jane Austen Banknote Deluged With Threats

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
5:14 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Fiery Explosions Rock Florida Propane Tank Plant

A Blue Rhino propane gas plant burns, as seen in a frame grab from an AP video. The fire sent at least seven workers to the hospital Monday night.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 9:23 am

A series of fiery explosions ravaged a Blue Rhino propane gas plant in central Florida's Lake County late Monday night, forcing nearby residents to be evacuated. The detonations reportedly lasted for some 30 minutes and were heard as far as 10 miles away. A fire at the plant raged into the early morning hours.

Update at 11:10 a.m. ET: Work Continues; No Sign Of Sabotage

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Around the Nation
4:40 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Giant KFC Bucket Not Your Typical Yard Decoration

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. In Waynesboro, Georgia, Aleena Headrick thought she was hallucinating when she saw a huge Kentucky Fried Chicken bucket in her front yard. Turns out her landlord collects vintage signs and put it there. It quickly became a big draw for gawkers, which Headrick finds amusing.

It's All Politics
4:33 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Abortion Drives Bigger Wedge Between Red And Blue States

Texas, where abortion-rights battles took place in July at the state capitol, is part of an eight-state region that has gotten more conservative on the issue.
Eric Gay AP

Regional disparities over the abortion issue have grown during the past two decades, leading to an ever widening gulf between the nation's most conservative and most liberal regions.

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Around the Nation
3:51 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Missing Class Ring Turns Up 65 Years Later

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:46 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Richard Diedrich of Illinois lost his high school class ring in 1948. His girlfriend had been wearing it, but removed it to dissect a frog in biology class. It disappeared. Sixty-five years later, a guy name Mike Geiger was using a metal detector on a Wisconsin lake. He found the ring and contacted the school, looking for an alum with the initials RD. He says the first RD he reached wasn't friendly. The second can't believe he's got his ring again at age 82.

NPR Story
3:10 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Survey Shows Regional Divide On Abortion

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

American attitudes towards abortion reflects strong regional differences in opinion, and a new poll shows that divide seems to be growing. For more on what Americans have to say about abortion, we're joined now by Michael Dimock. He's the director of the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, which conducted the survey. Good morning.

MICHAEL DIMOCK: Good morning.

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NPR Story
3:10 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Yellen Emerges As A Top Choice To Lead Federal Reserve

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:46 am

Janet Yellen is on President Obama's short list to replace Ben Bernanke at the Federal Reserve.

NPR Story
3:10 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Police: Jailbreak In Pakistan Frees More Than 250

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Pakistan, militants armed with heavy weapons have attacked a prison not far from the border with Afghanistan. According to police, around 250 prisoners were freed. The Pakistani Taliban is taking responsibility for the violent attack, which included mortars and rocket-propelled grenades. The hours-long middle-of-the-night battle left at least a dozen people dead, guards and civilians. With us now from the capital Islamabad is Sebastian Abbot. He's the bureau chief for the Associated Press there, and thank you for joining us.

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Health Care
1:52 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Montana's State-Run Free Clinic Sees Early Success

Montana opened the first government-run medical clinic for state employees last fall. A year later, the state says the clinic is already saving money.
Dan Boyce for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:46 am

A year ago, Montana opened the nation's first clinic for free primary healthcare services to its state government employees. The Helena, Mont., clinic was pitched as a way to improve overall employee health, but the idea has faced its fair share of political opposition.

A year later, the state says the clinic is already saving money.

Pamela Weitz, a 61-year-old state library technician, was skeptical about the place at first.

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The Salt
1:51 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Fast-Food Strikers Demand A 'Living Wage'

People gathered outside a Wendy's restaurant in New York City on Monday as part of a one-day strike calling for higher wages for fast-food workers.
Justin Lane EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 6:22 am

At a Wendy's restaurant in Lower Manhattan on Monday, protesters urged the lunchtime crowd to skip the Value Menu for one day. They blocked the sidewalk and half of the street.

Shanell Young held a red strike sign over her head. Young earns the minimum wage, $7.25 an hour, at another Wendy's in New York. She says that's not enough to support her and her 5-year-old son.

"It's horrible," says Young. "Everything goes up. It's unfair. You can't find an apartment. You can't pay for children's school uniforms. Everything is unfair. We can't live off this."

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Movie Interviews
1:51 am
Tue July 30, 2013

'Smash & Grab': How Pink Panthers Stole Millions In Jewels

Havana Marking's documentary Smash and Grab depicts members of the Pink Panthers, an international ring of jewel thieves.
Goldcrest Films

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 10:21 am

In this age of cyber-crime and online espionage, here's a good old-fashioned story about cops and robbers: Smash & Grab, a new documentary film opening in New York on Wednesday, details the exploits of the "Pink Panthers" — a group of international jewel thieves that, for the past decade, has targeted high-end jewelry shops across Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

According to the international police agency, Interpol, the Pink Panthers have stolen nearly a half a billion dollars worth of jewels over roughly 500 robberies.

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All Tech Considered
1:49 am
Tue July 30, 2013

With Smarter Cars, The Doors Are Open To Hacking Dangers

The Toyota Prius, seen here at the New York International Auto Show in March, was one of the cars security experts Chris Valasek and Charlie Miller showed to be susceptible to attacks by hackers.
Mike Segar Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:46 am

Chris Valasek and Charlie Miller have been hacking into products for a long time. But they don't steal stuff or mess with people; instead, their purpose is to pressure companies into making their products more secure.

This week, they scored big. Their research on hacking cars has captured the attention of millions and has been featured in Forbes and on the Today show.

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Research News
1:15 am
Tue July 30, 2013

For Some Mammals It's One Love, But Reasons Still Unclear

Golden lion tamarins are one species that are largely monogamous.
Felipe Dana AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 9:11 am

Fewer than 10 percent of all mammal species are monogamous. In fact, biologists have long disagreed over why monogamy exists at all. That's the subject of two studies published this week — and they come to different conclusions.

Animals that leave the most offspring win the race to spread their genes and to perpetuate their lineage. So for most mammals, males have a simple strategy: Mate with as many females as possible.

"Monogamy is a problem," says Dieter Lukas, a biologist at Cambridge University. "Why should a male keep to one female?"

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The Two-Way
4:26 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Senate Confirms James Comey As Next FBI Director

Former Deputy Attorney General James B. Comey waits to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington on May 15, 2007. NPR has learned that Comey is in line to become President Obama's choice as the next FBI director.
Susan Walsh AP

With a vote of 93-1, the Senate confirmed James Comey as the next director of the FBI. Comey will replace Robert Mueller.

NPR's Carrie Johnson filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Comey is a Republican and a former Justice Department official during the George W. Bush years. Civil rights groups questioned his record on surveillance and harsh interrogation of terrorism suspects.

"But after Kentucky Republican Rand Paul lifted his hold on the FBI nominee, Comey sailed through the full Senate.

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The Two-Way
3:51 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Police Arrest Woman Suspected Of Vandalizing Washington Icon

Green paint was discovered in two chapels inside the National Cathedral in Washington on Monday.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 5:07 pm

Police in Washington, D.C., say a woman has been arrested, suspected of splattering green paint across the organ at the National Cathedral, the Episcopalian church that has long served as the country's spiritual home.

CNN's Dan Merica tweeted this photo of church:

NPR member station WAMU reports the arrest follows a series of similar acts of vandalism across Washington.

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Shots - Health News
3:49 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Panel Urges Lung Cancer Screening For Millions Of Americans

Some images of lung cancer are clear cut. But in many others, a nodule on the screen turns out not to be cancer at all.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 12:24 pm

A federal task force is planning to recommend that millions of smokers and former smokers get a CT scan annually to look for early signs of lung cancer.

The 16-member US Preventive Services Task Force gives that lung cancer screening test a grade of B, which puts it on the same level as mammography for women between the ages of 50 and 74.

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Code Switch
3:49 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

In Nation's First Black Public High School, A Blueprint For Reform

Dunbar High School has a notable list of graduates, including the first black presidential Cabinet member, the first black general in the Army and several of the lawyers who argued the Brown v. Board of Education decision.
Courtesy of Chicago Review Press

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 12:26 pm

The nation's first black public high school, Paul Laurence Dunbar High, opened its doors in Washington, D.C., in 1870. But more than 140 years later, Dunbar — like many urban schools — has fallen on hard times. The crumbling, brutalist-style building is often described as a prison, and graduation rates hover around 60 percent.

But it wasn't always that way. Once upon a time, the yearbook read like a Who's Who of black America.

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It's All Politics
3:45 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Obama And Clinton Meet For 'Friendship' Lunch

President Obama has lunch with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on the patio outside the Oval Office on Monday.
Chuck Kennedy The White House

Talk about a power lunch.

President Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met Monday for a private lunch that immediately sparked speculation about what it means for the 2016 presidential race.

The visit marked at least the second time the two have met privately since Clinton left the State Department earlier this year. Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, met with Obama and first lady Michelle Obama for a private White House dinner in March.

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All Tech Considered
3:40 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

What We're Watching As World's Big Hackers Meet In Las Vegas

Hackers attend the 2011 Def Con conference in Las Vegas. The 2013 conference as well as the Black Hat hacker conference kicks off this week.
Isaac Brekken AP

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

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U.S.
3:27 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Statue Brings Friction Over WWII Comfort Women To California

South Korean police stand guard beside a comfort woman statue in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul in May. The Southern California city of Glendale will dedicate an identical statue on Tuesday.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

For decades, Koreans have been pushing to preserve the legacy of women forced to provide sex to Japanese army soldiers during World War II. Glendale, Calif., will dedicate a statue memorializing the victims, known as "comfort women," on Tuesday. But the statue has spurred controversy in this Southern California city, where some area residents say it is a divisive reminder of the horrors of war.

The sculpture is a bronze statue of a young girl. She looks about 14 — around the same age as many comfort women when they were forced into military brothels run by Japan's imperial army.

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