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3:24 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Tensions Flare Over Rock Of Gibraltar

Once again, Spain and Britain are at odds over a tiny limestone peninsula at Europe's southern tip — Gibraltar. It's physically attached to Spain but has been a British territory for 300 years. Now some Spaniards want it back.

Law
2:22 am
Wed August 7, 2013

With Holder In The Lead, Sentencing Reform Gains Momentum

Attorney General Eric Holder is calling for significant changes to the way the nation deals with convicted criminals. And he's not alone.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 9:21 am

Sit down with the attorney general to ask him about his priorities, as NPR did earlier this year, and he'll talk about voting rights and national security. But if you listen a bit longer, Eric Holder gets to this: "I think there are too many people in jail for too long, and for not necessarily good reasons."

This is the nation's top law enforcement officer calling for a sea change in the criminal justice system. And he's not alone.

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All Tech Considered
2:21 am
Wed August 7, 2013

As Twitter Expands Reach, Abuse Policy Gets Added Scrutiny

This week, several women in the U.K. went public about explicit abuse they received on Twitter.
Alastair Grant AP

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 10:26 am

A series of threats and abusive messages aimed at prominent women in the U.K. have placed Twitter in an awkward spot. As the company gears up to go public and expand its brand around the world, it is increasingly running into cultural and legal hurdles that challenge Twitter's free speech ethos.

Earlier this year, Caroline Criado-Perez led a successful campaign to keep non-royal British women on the country's currency. Then last week, because of that work, the 29-year-old activist and blogger became the target of an organized barrage of hateful messages on Twitter.

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Africa
2:21 am
Wed August 7, 2013

For Ethiopian Women, Construction Jobs Offer A Better Life

Mekedes Getachew, 19, has been working at construction sites in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, since she was 15 years old. Except for the heaviest lifting, she says, the laborers "all do the same work and we don't really say this is a man's job, but when it comes to salary there's a difference." She earns $1.50 a day. Men earn $2.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 5:32 pm

Earlier this summer in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, I heard a complaint from many professionals that they could no longer find cheap house cleaners and nannies.

The apparently endless supply of girls and young women from the countryside who would work for peanuts just for a chance to move to the capital was drying up. It turns out more and more of them are finding work on one of the city's many construction sites.

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The Two-Way
2:11 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Cleveland House Of Horrors Comes Down

A general view of the exterior of the house, where three women who had disappeared as teenagers approximately 10 years ago, were found alive on May 6 in Cleveland, Ohio.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 7:59 am

Ariel Castro's house in Cleveland where three women were held captive and raped for about a decade will be demolished this morning.

Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight were freed on May 6.

Brian Bull of member station WCPN reports that electricity at 2207 Seymour Ave. was turned off after family members and friends picked up personal items on Monday.

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Sweetness And Light
11:12 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Dick Kazmaier, 'A Honey Of A Guy'

Dick Kazmaier of Princeton University poses with the Heisman Trophy at New York's Downtown Athletic Club before the official presentation in 1951. Kazmaier, the last Ivy Leaguer to win the Heisman Trophy, died on Thursday.
John Rooney AP

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 3:24 am

You may never have heard of Dick Kazmaier. After all, he played in the Ivy League, never went to the NFL and filled a position, tailback, in a formation, the single-wing, that has long since disappeared.

But as the years have passed, that is what makes Kazmaier so special: that he best represented another time, when there was more whimsy and capriciousness to college athletics.

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The Two-Way
10:55 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Obama To Leno: 'There Is No Spying On Americans'

President Obama jokes with Jay Leno during a commercial break at the taping of his appearance on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno on Tuesday in Los Angeles.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 9:01 am

President Obama defended the U.S. government's surveillance programs, telling NBC's Jay Leno on Tuesday that: "There is no spying on Americans."

"We don't have a domestic spying program," Obama said on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. "What we do have is some mechanisms that can track a phone number or an email address that is connected to a terrorist attack. ... That information is useful."

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Law
5:25 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

DOJ Sues Bank Of America Over Mortgage-Backed Securities

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The Justice Department is bringing civil charges against one of the nation's largest banks. The government alleges Bank of America made false statements about the quality of $850 million worth of home loans. Those loans were then sold to investors. NPR's Chris Arnold reports.

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Shots - Health News
4:33 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Genetic Code Shows Bird Flu In China Spread Between People

A man who just recovered from the H7N9 bird flu leaves a hospital in Bozhou, China, in April. Since early May, the number of new H7N9 cases has dramatically declined.
AFP Getty Images

When a new strain of bird flu cropped up in China last winter, the billion-dollar question was whether the deadly virus could transmit between people.

Now, Chinese scientists offer the first clear evidence that the bird flu is indeed contagious, although only slightly.

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The Two-Way
4:32 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Judge Cuts Bradley Manning's Possible Sentence To 90 Years

Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted from court on July 25, in Fort Meade, Md.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

The military judge presiding over the sentencing of Pfc. Bradley Manning today reduced the maximum possible sentence the former intelligence analyst could face.

Manning, 25, who was found guilty of espionage and theft in the largest leak of classified intelligence in U.S. history, could face up to 90 years in prison, a maximum sentence that is down from the original 136 years.

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Business
4:26 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

With An Industry In Turmoil, Why Buy A Newspaper Company?

The Washington Post is now in its seventh straight year of declining revenues, says the paper's chairman, Donald Graham. Rather than continue to watch the paper struggle, Graham and Publisher Katharine Weymouth decided to look for a buyer.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:20 pm

Donald Graham, chairman of The Washington Post Co., is the son and grandson of its leaders for the past 80 years. And along with his niece, publisher Katharine Weymouth, Graham admitted in a video on The Post's website that the family simply didn't have the answers to questions about the paper's future.

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U.S.
3:49 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Border Drug Busts Putting Strain On Texas County's Budget

Trains that once deposited travelers for shopping and dining in dusty Sierra Blanca, Texas, no longer stop here. Interstates further eroded the local economy as more people chose to live and shop in El Paso, 85 miles away.
G.W. Schulz The Center for Investigative Reporting

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:25 pm

As they walk through the front door, visitors to the Hudspeth County Sheriff's Office in Sierra Blanca, Texas, get punched by the overpowering odor of marijuana.

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Environment
3:46 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Wells Are Running Dry In Parts Of Kansas

Nate Pike fears that wells, like this one that supplies his ranch with water, will dry up completely after years of water pumping and irrigation in Kansas.
Frank Morris KCUR

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:27 pm

Imagine enough water to fill a couple of Great Lakes, but spread under some of the driest parts of eight Western states. That was the High Plains Aquifer 60 years ago.

But now, Nate Pike, whose been riding the dry rolling ranch lands south of Dodge City, Kan., for most of his 80 years, can't even go fishing at his favorite spring called St. Jacob's Well.

"And that thing had a lot of water in it. It never went down, never changed," he says. "But as you can see now, I can't believe I can't see the water from up here."

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The Two-Way
3:17 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Reports: U.S. Files First Criminal Charges In Benghazi Attacks

Sept. 11: The U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, was aflame after coming under attack.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 4:10 pm

CNN, The Wall Street Journal and NBC News are reporting that the United States has filed charges against a number of people suspected of orchestrating the attacks against the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

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The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

California Takes Drivers' Orders For 'Vintage' Car Plates

The real deal: California's new vintage car tag program would let drivers emulate icons of cool such as actor Steve McQueen, seen here in his Ford-Cobra roadster in 1963.
Dick Stroebel AP

Thousands of California drivers are ordering specialty vintage license tags for their cars, in a program that lets people choose new tags based on designs from the 1950s, '60s, and '70s. The throw-back plates will let drivers put iconic blue, black, or yellow plates on their vehicles.

And in a nod to way things used to be, the tags' letters and numbers will be stamped, not screen-printed, as John Rabe reports for Southern California Public Radio.

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Environment
3:12 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Earth Scientists Pin Climate Change Squarely On 'Humanity'

Pedersen Glacier, 1917
Louis H. Pedersen climate.gov/National Snow and Ice Data Center

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:12 pm

The weather is one of those topics that is fairly easy for people to agree on. Climate, however, is something else.

Most of the scientists who study the Earth say our climate is changing and humans are part of what's making that happen. But to a lot of nonscientists it's still murky. This week, two of the nation's most venerable scientific institutions tried to explain it better.

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Pop Culture
3:12 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Fear Of Clowns: Yes, It's Real

Tim Curry as Pennywise in a 1990 TV adaptation of Stephen King's It. Come on, tell us you aren't just a little creeped out.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 10:53 pm

Warning: The following story may be upsetting to some people.

That's because it's about clowns.

Yes, clowns. Painted white faces, red lips, receding hairlines with tufts of wild hair, and — of course — the red foam nose. Fun for all ages, yet plenty of people are downright scared of them. There's even a word for it: coulrophobia, though that's not an official diagnosis.

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The Salt
2:54 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Heck No Or Let's Go? Your Thoughts On Lab-Grown Meat

The scientists who developed the in vitro beef say it could help solve the coming food crisis and combat climate change.
David Parry / PA Wire

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 3:52 pm

Would you taste or buy a lab-grown hamburger if you could? That's the question we posed Monday at the end of our report on the world's first in vitro burger, launched this week at a tasting event in London that was streamed via the Internet.

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It's All Politics
2:49 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

With 'Post' Purchase, High-Tech Continues Its March On D.C.

Jeff Bezos, CEO and founder of Amazon.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 3:44 pm

It's kind of an obvious thought: Jeff Bezos' purchase of The Washington Post is Richard Nixon's revenge.

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It's All Politics
2:33 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Cory Booker: Supermayor Or Self-Promoter?

Newark Mayor Cory Booker speaks about his Senate campaign, outside the Grove Path Station in Jersey City, N.J., last month.
Ashlee Espinal The Jersey Journal/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:25 pm

In one week, voters in New Jersey go to the polls in a special primary election for a U.S. Senate seat.

No one on the ballot has more name recognition than Cory Booker, the 44-year-old mayor of Newark, who is considered a rising star in the Democratic Party. But Booker's critics say he's been more focused on his own ambitions than on governing New Jersey's largest city.

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From Our Listeners
2:08 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Vacation Horror Stories: Train Troubles In Budapest

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

It's time now for another one of our cautionary listener travelogues, also known by the catchier title...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Vacation...

(SOUNDBITE OF A SCREAM)

SIEGEL: ...Horror Stories.

DORIE PICKLE: My name is Dorie Pickle. I live in Austin, Texas. If my parents are listening, I urge you to turn off the radio. I believe I've never told you this story.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Media
2:08 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

'Washington Post' May Find Conflicts In Amazon Coverage

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:25 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The sale of The Washington Post to Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos could bring up conflict between the owner's interests and the paper's editorial independence. I talked about some of those issues with longtime media executive and consultant Merrill Brown. Among his jobs, he was a reporter and then corporate executive for The Washington Post. Later, he was founding editor-in-chief of msnbc.com. I asked Brown what he sees as potential conflicts of interest with Bezos at the helm of The Post.

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The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

U.S. Sues Bank Of America Over Mortgage-Backed Securities

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 2:33 pm

The Department of Justice announced Tuesday that it was suing Bank of America for allegedly lying to investors about the riskiness of about $850 million worth of mortgage-backed securities back in 2008.

According to a press release by the Justice Department, the action is part of efforts of the Obama administration's Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force's RMBS Working Group.

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The Two-Way
1:48 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

New Magazine Takes A Grown-Up Look At Adoption

The new online magazine Gazillion Voices was begun in the hopes of shaping a new national conversation on adoption, the website says.
Gazillion Voices

The complex and interconnected topics of adoption, race, and culture will form the backbone of a new online magazine that is starting this week. Gazillion Voices was begun with those goals in mind, says Kevin Vollmers, who created the magazine as an extension of his blog, Land of Gazillion Adoptees.

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The Two-Way
11:53 am
Tue August 6, 2013

PBS Names Gwen Ifill, Judy Woodruff Co-Anchors Of 'NewsHour'

Gwen Ifill, left, and Judy Woodruff.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 8:14 am

PBS says Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff will share the job of anchoring public television's News Hour.

"The veteran correspondents were also named managing editors of the weekly news program," PBS reports on the Newshour blog.

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The Two-Way
11:08 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Pentagon Cuts Workers' Mandated Furloughs From 11 To 6 Days

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 12:30 pm

Civilian workers for the Department of Defense will have to take six mandatory unpaid furlough days instead of 11 days, according to an Associated Press report that the Pentagon confirmed Tuesday afternoon.

Update at 2:20 p.m. ET: Pentagon Confirms Reduced Furloughs

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and the Pentagon have issued a statement announcing the reduction in civilian furlough days, from 11 to six.

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Shots - Health News
10:43 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Falling Obesity Rates Among Preschoolers Mark Healthful Trend

This map from the CDC shows decreases (light blue) and increases (gray) in obesity prevalence among low-income, preschool-aged children from 2008-2011.
CDC

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 5:47 am

A fresh analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests the tide may be turning on the childhood obesity front.

After decades of steady increases, 19 states and U.S. territories saw small decreases in their rates of obesity among low-income preschoolers. And another 20 states held steady at current rates.

A CDC map shows several Southern states — including Florida, Georgia and Mississippi — that are part of the downward trend.

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The Two-Way
10:38 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Bezos Can Help 'Post' Disrupt Other Businesses, Editor Says

Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon.com and soon-to-be owner of The Washington Post, last month in Sun Valley, Idaho.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images
  • From 'Here & Now': 'Washington Post' executive editor Martin Baron on new owner Jeff Bezos

What does Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos bring to The Washington Post, which he just agreed to buy for $250 million?

Here's how the Post's executive editor, Martin Baron, answered that question Tuesday on Here & Now:

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The Two-Way
10:38 am
Tue August 6, 2013

WATCH: 'Mormon Missionaries' Dominate Pickup Basketball Game

A screen-shot from YouTube of a game of pickup basketball.
YouTube

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 12:16 pm

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The Two-Way
10:12 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Japan Shows Off Largest Warship In 60 Years

Japan's new warship, the Izumo, draws a crowd for its launch ceremony at the port in Yokohama Tuesday. At 248 meters (814 feet) in length, the flat-topped ship has been called a destroyer, or a helicopter carrier.
Toshifumi Kitamura AFP/Getty Images

It's being called a destroyer, or perhaps a helicopter carrier. But by any name, Japan's new warship, unveiled Tuesday, is the largest it has built since World War II. The ship was shown to the public on the anniversary of the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima, and at a time of escalating tensions with China.

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