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Parallels
10:22 am
Mon August 5, 2013

A West Bank Spring At The Center Of Deadly Struggle

Palestinian Bashir Tamimi, 57, drinks water from a spring on land that he says belongs to his family. Teenagers from a nearby Israeli settlement built collection pools and brought in picnic tables when they saw no one using the spring. It has now become a source of conflict.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 8:00 am

There's a pretty little spring in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, where fresh water has dripped from the rock, probably for centuries.

Now it is the center of a deadly struggle over land.

Israeli teenagers from Halamish, the Jewish settlement a short walk uphill, found the spring several years ago. It flows from a small cave.

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Remembrances
10:02 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Civil Rights Leader Julius Chambers Fought Through Courts

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 10:44 am

Julius Chambers argued numerous civil rights cases before the U.S. Supreme Court - and won them all. Host Michel Martin remembers the groundbreaking attorney, who passed away recently at the age of 76.

Sports
10:02 am
Mon August 5, 2013

NFL: Is The Game Getting Safer?

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 10:44 am

As fans and teams get ready for another season of football, a new study sheds light on game safety. Host Michel Martin talks with Jesse David of Edgeworth Economics about whether efforts to cut down on serious injuries are getting results.

Religion
10:02 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Sikh Says No Room For Hate, A Year After Temple Shooting

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 10:44 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. You might have caught some preseason football action over the weekend. Football season is almost here, which means it's also time to think again about how to make the game safer. We'll tell you about a new independent study about whether efforts to cut down on serious injuries, especially brain injuries, is achieving any results. That's coming up later.

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Politics
10:02 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Lack of Leadership Causing US Defense Issues Abroad?

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 10:44 am

A terror threat closes American embassies, and changes the political debate about intelligence gathering. Host Michel Martin talks politics with Republican strategist Ron Christie, and former Obama administration advisor Corey Ealons.

The Two-Way
9:54 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Costa Rica Will Do Away With Caged Animals At Its Zoos

A spider monkey sits inside its cage last month at the Simon Bolivar Zoo, which recently celebrated its 97th anniversary, in San Jose, Costa Rica.
Hector Retamal AFP/Getty Images

Here's a bit of news that has been making the rounds in Costa Rica for more than a week but is just now picking up steam stateside: Saying it's time for a more natural experience, Costa Rica's minister for energy and environment said they would get rid of caged animals at the country's public zoos by next year.

The Associated Press, which resurfaced the story today, reports:

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The Two-Way
9:19 am
Mon August 5, 2013

San Diego Mayor Starting Rehab; Accusers Count Now At 10

San Diego Mayor Bob Filner in July.
Bill Wechter Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 9:23 am

Today's the day San Diego Mayor Bob Filner, who's now been accused by 10 women of sexual harassment, is to start two weeks of treatment at a behavior counseling clinic.

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The Two-Way
8:27 am
Mon August 5, 2013

4-Year-Old Re-Elected 'Mayor' Of Minnesota Town

Mayor Bobby Tufts of Dorset, Minn.
Jeff Baenen AP

His second job will be at a pre-school.

As a student.

Four-year-old Bobby Tufts was re-elected "mayor" over the weekend in the tiny northern Minnesota community of Dorset. We say "mayor" because Dorset doesn't really have a government. It doesn't even have many people — "22 to 28, depending on whether the minister and his family are in town," according to CBS Minnesota.

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The Two-Way
8:26 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Bike Commuter Miffed By Notice Of 15-Minute-Only Parking

"So I got a ticket," bike commuter Molly Millar wrote in a tweet last week. The Vancouver cyclist had left her bike in a rack outside her office building.
Molly Millar Twitter

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 9:24 am

A cyclist who commutes to work in Vancouver, Canada, was surprised and angered last week when she found a note from her office building on her bike that threatened its confiscation. Her offense? Parking in the "15-minute-only" bike rack.

"So I got a ticket from #CadillacFairview for parking my bike outside their building/my office," tweeted Molly Millar, who works in the Vancouver Sun & Province Building, also known as Granville Square.

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The Two-Way
7:14 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Woman Killed In Venice Beach Rampage Was On Her Honeymoon

Flowers and notes have been left at the scene in Venice Beach, Calif., where Italian honeymooner Alice Gruppioni was killed and about a dozen more people were injured by a car that plowed through crowds on the boardwalk.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 8:11 am

The young woman killed Saturday when a car plowed through the crowded boardwalk in Venice Beach, Calif., was an Italian honeymooner.

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The Two-Way
6:21 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Terror Threat Shakes Up NSA Debate, Unites Some Lawmakers

A checkpoint leading to the closed U.S. Embassy compound in the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, on Saturday.
Mohammed Huwais AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 9:17 am

The Obama administration's weekend decision to close diplomatic posts from Central Asia through the Middle East and into North Africa has led to applause from "rattled lawmakers in both parties," The Washington Post writes.

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The Two-Way
5:20 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Book News: Justice Department Proposes Punishments For Apple

The Justice Department is asking the court to force Apple to submit to broad oversight.
Eugene Hoshiko AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 12:10 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
5:14 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Baseball Suspends Alex Rodriguez For 211 Games

He's waiting to hear his fate: New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez.
John Angelillo UPI /Landov

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:49 pm

(We most recently updated this post at 6:48 p.m. ET.)

New York Yankees' slugger Alex Rodriguez, one of baseball's brightest stars and its highest-paid player, will be suspended through the 2014 regular season because he violated parts of baseball's Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program, the league said today.

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Around the Nation
5:09 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Sideburns Contest To Honor Commodore Perry

Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry won a major victory over the British 200 years ago at the Battle of Lake Erie. On Wednesday the citizens of Erie, Pa., will honor him the best way they know how — with a sideburns contest. Judges are looking for sideburns that resemble Commodore Perry's famous mutton chops.

Around the Nation
5:05 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Preschooler To Serve Second Term As Mayor Of Minn. Town

The mayor of Dorset, Minn., is now four years old. Bobby Tufts' named was pulled out of a hat last year, making him mayor of the town of 20 people. Dorset doesn't have a formal government. On Sunday, his name was drawn again.

Books News & Features
4:59 am
Mon August 5, 2013

E-Books Strain Relations Between Libraries, Publishing Houses

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 12:23 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

E-books have strained the relations between libraries and the major publishing houses. Libraries say they're being cut out of the market because publishers are afraid they could lose money selling e-books to libraries. After much negotiation, the publishers are experimenting with new ways of doing business. But some libraries are already looking to bypass the high prices and restrictions that publishers place on e-books.

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Africa
4:23 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Why Gay Pride Celebrations In Uganda Were Discreet

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 11:44 am

Gay pride celebrations are held loudly each summer in New York, Paris and Berlin. But when Uganda held its version of the event this weekend, it was done very privately. It came as the Ugandan parliament considers a piece of extremely anti-gay legislation, and as discrimination against gays is widespread

Around the Nation
4:07 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Donations Help Detroit Bury Unclaimed Bodies

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 8:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Sports
3:52 am
Mon August 5, 2013

A-Rod Said To Be Facing Long Suspension From Baseball

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Major League Baseball appears set to hand down suspensions to several players implicated in performance enhancing drug use. New York Yankees All-Star Alex Rodriguez is the biggest name by far on that list and he also faces the longest suspension. NPR's Mike Pesca joins us now for an update. Good morning.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

MONTAGNE: So what length of penalty does Alex Rodriguez face?

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Television
3:10 am
Mon August 5, 2013

BBC Announces Peter Capaldi Is The Next Dr. Who

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 3:40 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

From space travel to travel through space and time...

(SOUNDBITE OF SOUND EFFECTS)

WERTHEIMER: Any fan of "Dr. Who" recognizes that sound. It's a whirling blue police call box, a tardis, transporting the main character on the long running BBC program. The plot line has the Doctor regenerating ever so often. Which means a new actor comes in to play the title role, and now the 50-year-old science fiction show has just named its 12th Doctor.

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Politics
3:10 am
Mon August 5, 2013

McConnell Squares Off With Rivals At Ky. Political Picnic

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 3:44 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Over the weekend the tiny town of Fancy Farm, Kentucky was the scene of a political brawl worthy of the Hatfields and McCoys. No one was run out of town, but Mitch O'Connell, the Senate Republican leader, who is asking Kentuckians for a sixth term, did get pretty roughed up - verbally. You'd hardly guess it all began as a church picnic.

NPR's David Welna was there.

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Analysis
3:10 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Washington Stresses Seriousness Of Terrorist Threat

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 5:29 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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The Salt
1:27 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Ecologists Turn To Planned Grazing To Revive Grassland Soil

Fox Ranch, outside Yuma County, Colo., is a 14,000-acre nature preserve and working commercial cattle ranch. The ranch is used by the Nature Conservancy to put into practice its panned grazing technique.
Luke Runyon Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 2:24 pm

The world's soil is in trouble. Ecologists say without dramatic changes to how we manage land, vast swathes of grassland are at risk of turning into hard-packed desert. To make sure that doesn't happen, researchers are testing out innovative ways to keep moisture in the soil.

In eastern Colorado, one way could be in the plodding hooves of cattle.

Conventional wisdom tells you that if ranchland ground has less grass, the problem is too many cows. But that's not always the case. It depends on how you manage them, if you make sure they keep moving.

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Shots - Health News
1:25 am
Mon August 5, 2013

When Treating Abnormal Breast Cells, Sometimes Less Is More

Sally O'Neill decided to have a double mastectomy rather than "do a wait-and-see."
Richard Knox NPR

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 9:39 am

When Sally O'Neill's doctor told her she had an early form of cancer in one of her breasts, she didn't agonize about what she wanted to.

The 42-year-old mother of two young girls wanted a double mastectomy.

"I decided at that moment that I wanted them both taken off," says O'Neill, who lives in a suburb of Boston. "There wasn't a real lot of thought process to it. I always thought, 'If this happens to me, this is what I'm going to do.' Because I'm not taking any chances. I want the best possible outcome. I don't want to do a wait-and-see."

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
1:24 am
Mon August 5, 2013

To Join '63 March On Washington: 'Like Climbing A Mountain'

A newspaper clipping from The Cincinnati Herald on Sept. 14, 1963, included a picture of Jack Hansan and other members of the Cincinnati delegation.
Courtesy of Jack Hansan

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 7:49 am

For the Month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream Speech" on Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capitol from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

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Space
1:22 am
Mon August 5, 2013

A Year On Mars: What's Curiosity Been Up To?

This self-portrait of NASA's Mars rover Curiosity combines dozens of exposures taken by the rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager during the 177th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars, plus three exposures taken during Sol 270 to update the appearance of part of the ground beside the rover.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 8:55 am

Imagine winning the World Series, the lottery and a Nobel Prize all in one day. That's pretty much how scientists and engineers in mission control at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., felt one year ago when the 1 ton, six-wheeled rover named Curiosity landed safely on Mars.

Within minutes, the rover began sending pictures back to Earth. In the past year it has sent back a mountain of data and pictures that scientists are sorting through, trying to get a better understanding of the early climate on Mars.

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The Two-Way
12:56 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Calif. Gov. Brown Intervenes, BART Strike Averted For Now

A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) train sits in the Rockridge station on Friday in Oakland, Calif. San Francisco Bay Area commuters were bracing for the possibility of a BART strike as a 30-day contract extension was set to expire Sunday at midnight.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 7:35 am

Commuters can rest a little easier — another threatened strike at the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit system has been avoided, at least temporarily.

California Gov. Jerry Brown has appointed a board of investigators to look into the contract dispute that had threatened to shut down the system.

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Education
4:38 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

Missed Summer Learning Spells Out Long-Term Struggles

A researcher at Johns Hopkins University says there are serious setbacks for children without summer educational opportunities, known as the "summer slide."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 5:52 pm

At first glance, Horizons looks like an ordinary summer getaway for kids: There are games, bonding time and lots of bagged snacks. But along with the songs and the pool, there are fractions to memorize and online grammar quizzes to take.

An affiliate of a national network, the program in Washington, D.C., is a six-week, free summer service for children from low-income families. Its purpose is simple: to make sure they don't fall behind in school by the time September rolls around.

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Law
3:06 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

U.S. Teen Is Youngest Ever To Pass Britain's Bar Exams

At 18, Gabrielle Turnquest is the youngest person in the history of the English legal system to be admitted to the bar.
Neil Hall Courtesy The University of Law

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 4:38 pm

At 18 years old, Gabrielle Turnquest has become the youngest person to pass Britain's bar exams.

The Florida native told NPR's Jackie Lyden her family influenced her decision to study law in the United Kingdom. Her mother had studied in the U.K. and she joined an older sister who was also studying law.

She graduated from college early, too — at 16, she was the youngest person to ever get a psychology degree from Liberty University in Virginia.

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Remembrances
3:06 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

In His Own Words: Remembering Poet Robert Hayden

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 4:38 pm

Robert Hayden was born in Detroit 100 years ago Sunday. He became the first African-American to receive the honor now known as "poet laureate." Among his most famous works is the collection of short poems called Elegies for Paradise Valley. We hear an excerpt from the collection, as read by the author in 1976.

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