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Parallels
3:55 am
Sat May 25, 2013

In India, More Women Are Playing Matchmaker For Themselves

A bride and groom exchange rings during a traditional Indian wedding ceremony. Although most marriages in India are still arranged, a growing number of women are taking matters of the heart into their own hands, using social networking clubs and matrimonial websites.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 12:52 pm

In India, some of the most entertaining reading on a Sunday afternoon is found in the classified ads. Page after page, the matrimonial section trumpets the finer qualities of India's sons and daughters.

Parents looking to marry off their children often place ads such as this one: "Wanted: Well-settled, educated groom for fair, beautiful Bengali girl, 22, 5'3"."

The matrimonial ads are a hallowed tradition in the quest to find a life partner — part of the institution of matchmaking that is as old as the country itself.

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The Deadly Tornado In Moore, Okla.
3:55 am
Sat May 25, 2013

'Please, No More Clothes': Relief Groups Ask For Cash

Relief agencies like the American Red Cross say monetary donations give them the greatest flexibility to address victims' needs.
Erik Lesser EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 2:38 pm

The tornado that devastated much of Moore, Okla., has drawn loads of donations from across the country: food, clothing, medical supplies, toys. Much of it is needed by the victims, but not everything.

After every disaster, relief groups usually ask for one thing: money. But writing a check or texting a donation isn't always that satisfying for those who want so desperately to help.

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Europe
3:55 am
Sat May 25, 2013

War Of Words: France Debates Teaching Courses In English

Demonstrators in Paris protest Thursday against a measure to teach more university courses in English.
Jacques Demarthon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 3:13 pm

Will teaching in English at France's universities undermine the French language? That's up for debate in the country now, and the argument is heated.

The lower house of parliament approved a measure Thursday that would allow courses to be taught in English, something that is currently against the law.

Those in favor of the proposal say it will attract more international students and improve English language skills of French students. But opponents say the move will only impoverish and marginalize the country's tongue.

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The Two-Way
3:55 am
Sat May 25, 2013

Gnomes Crash Distinguished Garden Show In England

Despite the change in policy, some gardens maintained a more traditional appearance this year, such as the East Village display.
Ben Stansall AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 11:19 am

Gnomes marched their way into one of England's most prestigious gardening events this year. The 100th annual Chelsea Flower Show, which ends Saturday, opened its gates to the flower-friendly creatures for the first time.

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National Security
3:55 am
Sat May 25, 2013

Obama Keeps Distance From Torture Debate, At Least For Now

President Obama delivers a speech on national security Thursday at the National Defense University at Fort McNair in Washington.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 12:12 pm

In his national security speech Thursday, President Obama discussed drone warfare and the Guantanamo detention camp. But a third controversial issue went largely unmentioned: the use of interrogation methods that are tantamount to torture.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
11:33 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Panel Round One

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 9:21 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

We want to remind everyone that most weeks they can join us at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago. For tickets and more information on all our shows, go to wbez.org or you can find a link at our website waitwait.npr.org.

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Adam, there's almost nowhere left in the world free from advertising, but at least we have the refreshing clean taste of Pepsi Cola to comfort us.

(LAUGHTER)

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
11:33 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Bluff The Listener

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 9:21 am

Transcript

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News Quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis filling in for Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Adam Felber, Mo Rocca, and Faith Salie. And here again is your host, at the Orpheum Theater in Minneapolis, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill.

(APPLAUSE)

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

SAGAL: Right now, it is time for the WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME! Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-Wait-Wait to play our game on the air. Hi, you're on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
11:33 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Panel Round Two

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 9:21 am

Transcript

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR news quiz. I'm legendary anchorman Bill Kurtis, filling in for Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Mo Rocca, Faith Salie, and Adam Felber. And here again is your host from the Orpheum Theater in downtown Minneapolis.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill. In just a minute Bill pays tribute to his favorite Minnesota Twin, Joe Rhyme-auer.

(LAUGHTER)

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
11:33 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Limericks

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 9:21 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Coming up, it's Lightning Fill in the Blank. But first, it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-Wait-Wait. That's 1-888-924-8924 or click the contact us link on our website WaitWait.NPR.org. There you can find out about attending our weekly live shows at the Chase Bank Auditorium in Chicago and you can check out the latest How to Do Everything podcast. This week, Mike and Ian tell you how to get rid of all those delicious cicadas.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
11:33 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Who's Bill This Time

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm legendary anchorman Bill Kurtis, filling in for Carl Kasell.

(LAUGHTER)

KURTIS: And here is your host, at the Orpheum Theater in Minneapolis, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thank you so much. Thanks everyone. We've got a great show for you today. We've got NFL reporter Michele Tafoya, telling us what it's like to stand next to giant, aggressive men high on adrenaline.

(LAUGHTER)

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
11:32 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 9:21 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now it's time to move on to our final game, Lightning Fill in the Blank. Each of our players will have 60 second in which to answer as many fill in the blank questions as he or she can. Each correct answer's now worth two points. Bill, can you give us the scores?

BILL KURTIS: Adam has four, Faith has two, Mo has two.

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The Two-Way
5:25 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Toronto Mayor: 'I Do Not Use Crack Cocaine'

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford at a city council meeting on Tuesday.
Nathan Denette Associated Press

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford says he doesn't smoke crack cocaine and isn't an addict, in response to a video that surfaced recently purporting to show him using the illegal drug.

Last week Ford called the cellphone video obtained by The Toronto Star "ridiculous" and blamed the newspaper for "going after me."

Friday's comments from Ford were more emphatic.

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It's All Politics
4:54 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Obama's Terrorism Fight Is Colored Gray, Not Black And White

Protests like this one in 2010 in Pakistan in part led President Obama to recalibrate when U.S. officials will order drone strikes, as part of a nuanced policy.
B.K. Bangash AP

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 5:15 pm

It's difficult for an American president to govern through nuance, especially when it's necessary to persuade a majority of the people that certain actions are essential for national security. And effective persuasion usually requires clarity.

That's how you arrive at President George W. Bush's stark formulation "You're either with us, or you're with the terrorists" after Sept. 11, and much of what sprang from it.

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The Deadly Tornado In Moore, Okla.
4:03 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Tornado Safe Rooms In Schools A Popular, But Costly Idea

Many school safe rooms, like this one inside Jeffries Elementary in Springfield, Mo., also serve as gymnasiums. Constructed with a $1.6 million grant from FEMA, which covered 75 percent of the cost, the shelter can hold more than 500 people — enough to accommodate all the school's students and employees.
Scott Harvey KSMU

In the days since a tornado ripped through Moore, Okla., talk of constructing safe rooms in public schools has become commonplace.

In southwest Missouri, officials have built a few of them already, and they are seeking funding to build more.

'A Sense Of Peace'

Karina O'Connell is preparing dinner tonight under the pavilion at Phelps Grove Park in Springfield, Mo., where she's eating with her 9-year-old twin sons, Samuel and John Patrick.

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The Two-Way
3:44 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Hedge Fund Manager Apologizes For Comments On Female Traders

Paul Tudor Jones (left) at an National Audubon Society function in January.
Diane Bondareff Invision for the National Audubon Society

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 3:51 pm

Billionaire Paul Tudor Jones is back-peddling from remarks he made at a symposium last month that motherhood causes women to lose the necessary focus to be successful traders.

"As soon as that baby's lips touched that girl's bosom, forget it," Jones told an audience at the University of Virginia on April 26.

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Business
3:35 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

LA Bluejeans Makers Fear Their Business Will Fade Away

Samuel Ku, who runs AG Jeans alongside his father, says a European tariff puts thousands of U.S. clothing jobs at risk.
Amanda Marsalis

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 4:16 pm

Los Angeles is the world leader in the most American of clothing items: bluejeans. High-end, hand-stitched, designer bluejeans that will you run well over $100 a pair.

But as the U.S. apparel industry continues to shrink, LA's bluejeans business faces a threat: a nearly 40 percent tariff, imposed by the European Union, that could cripple the city's jean business.

When people talk about Ilse Metchek they use phrases like "she's a piece of work," "a force of nature," "she's something else." If you want to talk fashion, she's your lady.

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Around the Nation
3:26 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Battered Jersey Shore Pins Recovery Hopes On Summer Season

Construction workers work to rebuild the boardwalk in Seaside Heights in anticipation of Memorial Day weekend.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 10:37 am

Memorial Day weekend marks the start of the summer travel season, and it's particularly important for the resort communities along the Jersey Shore still suffering the effects of Hurricane Sandy.

In the popular tourist spot Point Pleasant Beach, N.J., it has taken seven months and more than $1 million to make repairs along Jenkinson's Boardwalk.

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Code Switch
3:26 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

History Makes Hiring Household Help A Complex Choice

Actress Marla Gibbs (as maid Florence Johnston) and actor Sherman Hemsley (as her boss, George Jefferson), appear in an episode of The Jeffersons.
CBS/Landov

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 4:39 pm

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World
3:26 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Toronto Mayor Dodges Accusations Of Crack Cocaine Use

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 4:28 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This remarkable statement today from the mayor of Toronto, Rob Ford.

(SOUNDBITE OF PREPARED STATEMENT)

MAYOR ROB FORD: I do not use crack cocaine, nor am I an addict of crack cocaine.

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The Two-Way
3:13 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

'Four Little Girls' Awarded Congressional Gold Medal

The Congressional Gold Medal has been posthumously awarded to four girls killed in the 1963 bombing of Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church. President Obama signed the legislation Friday, as (from left) Birmingham Mayor William Bell, Dr. Sharon Malone Holder, Attorney General Eric Holder, Rep. Terri Sewell, and relatives of Denise McNair and Carole Robertson look on.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 3:59 pm

They were just little girls when they were killed in 1963, in what came to be known as the 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing. And now Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Wesley have been awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, nearly 50 years after the attack in Birmingham, Ala.

President Obama signed the legislation Friday to award the girls — all of them 14, except for McNair, who was 11 — with the highest honor Congress can bestow upon a civilian.

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Shots - Health News
3:11 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

A Token Gift May Encourage Gift Of Life

A stamp can build awareness, but broader use of incentives could help boost blood donations.
Michael Rega iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 6:08 am

There are two things you can always count on: public radio pledge drives and the local blood bank asking for a donation of a very different sort.

Both kinds of giving can fill you with a sense of goodwill. But, let's be honest, the tote bags help, too.

When it comes to blood donations, though, ethical concerns and risk have led to limits on incentives for donors in many places. The World Health Organization has set a goal for governments around the world to reach completely voluntary and nonremunerated donations of blood by 2020.

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Movie Reviews
2:49 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

More Time Together, Though 'Midnight' Looms

Still Talking: After 18 years, Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy) apparently have plenty left to hash out.
Despina Spyrou Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 3:39 pm

Celine and Jesse are sporting a few physical wrinkles — and working through some unsettling relational ones — in Before Midnight, but that just makes this third installment of their once-dewy romance gratifyingly dissonant.

It's been 18 years since they talked through the night that first time, Julie Delpy's Celine enchanting and occasionally prickly, Ethan Hawke's Jesse determined to charm; their chatter then, as now, scripted but loose enough to feel improvised as captured in long, long takes by Richard Linklater's cameras.

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The Two-Way
2:08 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Ring Nebula Is More Like A Jelly Doughnut, NASA Says

The famous Ring Nebula is shown here in striking detail, in a composite image made from images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and infrared data from telescopes on Earth.
NASA, ESA, C.R. Robert O'Dell, G.J. Ferland, W.J. Henney and M. Peimbert

The Ring Nebula, whose iconic shape and large size make it a favorite of amateur astronomers, can now be seen in new detail, after NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured a sharp image of the nebula. Researchers say the new clarity reveals details that were previously unseen, and a structure that's more complex than scientists had believed.

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The Two-Way
1:42 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Ex-Guatemalan President Extradited To U.S.

Former Guatemalan President Alfonso Portillo speaks with journalists in Guatemala City before boarding a plane for the U.S. on Friday.
AFP/Getty Images

Former Guatemalan President Alfonso Portillo has been extradited to the United States, where he faces charges of laundering tens of millions of dollars through U.S. banks.

Portillo, who served as president from 2000 to 2004, was snatched from a hospital bed in Guatemala City, where he was recovering from liver surgery. He was placed on an airplane bound for New York, according to his lawyer, Mauricio Berreondo.

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Shots - Health News
1:21 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Heart Failure Treatment Improves, But Death Rate Remains High

Heart with congestive heart failure showing an enlarged left ventricle.
Brian Evans Science Source

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 2:31 pm

This is one of those "good news, but" medical stories.

New treatments for heart failure have made it much less likely that people with this chronic condition will die suddenly.

But an analysis by researchers at UCLA finds that the death rate for people with advanced heart failure remains stubbornly high, with 30 percent of people dying within three years.

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Environment
12:58 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Reinventing Farming For A Changing Climate

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman. You've likely heard of the legendary explorers Lewis and Clark, but maybe not of the U.S. Army explorer Stephen Harriman Long, an engineer who led a scientific expedition through the Great Plains 15 years after Lewis and Clark.

His expedition traveled through Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska. And what did his crew make of "America's Breadbasket"? A place wholly unfit for cultivation or agriculture, they said. On a map, the explorers labeled the Great Plains as the Great American Desert.

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Medical Treatments
12:58 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Studies Question Potential Alzheimer's Treatment

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman, filling in for Ira Flatow today. Last year, researchers reported a breakthrough in treating Alzheimer's disease. They'd found a drug that appeared to reverse the symptoms of Alzheimer's in mice. The drug was already on the market, approved by the FDA to treat a type of skin cancer, meaning Alzheimer's patients could ask their doctors for a prescription, and some did.

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The Salt
12:34 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

The Great Charcoal Debate: Briquettes Or Lumps?

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 2:30 pm

A lot of things about grilling can ignite a fight, including the meaning of "barbecue." And with the proliferation of fancy equipment — from gas grills to pellet smokers to ceramic charcoal cookers — amateur cooks are growing more knowledgeable, and opinionated, about how to best cook food outdoors.

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The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Google Reportedly Faces Antitrust Probe Over Display Ads

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 12:52 pm

The Federal Trade Commission is in the early stages of opening an antitrust probe into how Google runs its online display advertising business, according to a report by Bloomberg News, citing sources who want to remain anonymous because the FTC has not announced the probe.

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The Two-Way
12:12 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

News Corp. Board Approves Company Split

The head of News Corp., Rupert Murdoch, arrives at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in February.
Pascal Le Segretain Getty Images

Media empire News Corp., parent of Fox and The Wall Street Journal, will be cleaved into two businesses starting June 28: a publishing arm and one for entertainment.

The plan was first announced a year ago. As we reported at the time:

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