NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
7:30 am
Tue September 3, 2013

The Lava Lamp Has Turned 50; Here's Some Groovy Video

Far out.
Superfloop Flickr

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:52 am

Not much more needs to be said, man: The lava lamp "first hit stores in Britain on this day in 1963."

Read more
The Two-Way
7:27 am
Tue September 3, 2013

McCain Says Right Strikes Can Hurt Assad's Capabilities

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., met with President Obama on Sunday at the White House.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 11:18 am

By "taking out Bashar Assad's delivery capabilities of chemical weapons" the U.S. can make it much harder for the Syrian leader to wage war against his people and perhaps level the fighting field or turn it in favor of Assad's opponents, Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona said Tuesday on Morning Edition.

Read more
NPR Story
6:48 am
Tue September 3, 2013

McCain Backs President On Syria Strikes

Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona talks to Steve Inskeep about what he would like to see the U.S. do about Syria.

The Two-Way
5:55 am
Tue September 3, 2013

'The Worm' Returns To North Korea; Rodman Visits Again

Former basketball star Dennis Rodman at Beijing Capital International Airport on Tuesday, before his flight to Pyongyang, North Korea.
Petar Kujundzic Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 6:48 am

  • From the NPR Newscast: Anthony Kuhn reports on Dennis Rodman's latest visit to North Korea

Former NBA star Dennis Rodman is visiting North Korea again, six months after spending time there with dictator Kim Jong Un — an "awesome" man, in Rodman's opinion.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Beijing that:

"Rodman was spotted transiting the Beijing airport en route to Pyongyang, sporting his characteristic lip and nose rings, plus green hair.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:30 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Book News: Seamus Heaney's Last Words Were 'Don't Be Afraid'

Irish poet Seamus Heaney is pictured in 2010.
Paul McErlane EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 5:33 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:23 am
Tue September 3, 2013

For Microsoft, Nokia's Phones Are 'Key To Everything'

That's a Nokia Lumia 820 smartphone snapping an image of a Windows icon.
Dado Ruvic Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:52 am

Here's why Microsoft says its $7.2 billion deal to buy Nokia's smartphone business as well as that company's patents and services makes sense.

"It all starts with the phone," writes PCWorld, in a piece that analyzes why "the phone is key to everything."

According to the magazine:

Read more
The Two-Way
4:50 am
Tue September 3, 2013

2 Million Syrians Are Now Refugees And More Are 'On The Way'

Syrian-Kurdish children sit on a bed at the Quru Gusik refugee camp in the Kurdish region of northern Iraq, on Aug. 22. Faced with brutal violence and soaring prices, thousands of Syrian Kurds have poured into Iraq's autonomous Kurdish region. UNICEF has reported that over one million Syrian children live as refugees in other countries.
Safin Hamed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:08 am

"The number of Syrians forced to seek shelter abroad since civil war began in March 2011 passed the 2 million mark on Tuesday with no sign of the outflow ending soon," the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees reports. Most are in neighboring nations.

About 1 million of the refugees, as we've previously reported, are children.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:49 am
Tue September 3, 2013

U.S. Navy Wins Battle Of Lake Erie, Again

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with congratulations to the U.S. Navy, which won the battle of Lake Erie - again. Sailing ships re-enacted the victory over the British 200 ago during the War of 1812. The Port Clinton News Herald says the 2013 battle turned out the same, but with better technology: people captured the battle scenes on cell phones.

In 1813, the winning commander said we have met the enemy and they are ours. Which is short enough to say on Twitter. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
4:43 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Woman Waits 8 Years To Get Diamond After Chicken Ate It

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. A diamond is forever, luckily, because a chicken only lasts about eight years - which is how long a woman in England is willing to wait to get back a diamond earring, after her pet chicken gulped it down while sitting on her shoulder.

The diamond earring could be removed surgically, but Claire Lennon told "The Telegraph" she worries the 6-month-old chicken wouldn't survive. And her daughter loves the bird so the diamond-wait, for the pet to die naturally.

Around the Nation
3:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Radio Station KYAY Is Lifeline For Apache Tribe

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And on a reservation in Arizona, there's a tiny radio station marking its first year on the air. KYAY is owned by the San Carlos Apache Tribe and it's become a window into this isolated reservation, offering news and entertainment. NPR's Kirk Siegler has been listening.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRADITIONAL APACHE SONG)

KIRK SIEGLER: From a cinder block building in a dusty lot on the edge of San Carlos, comes KYAY 91.1 FM, the voice of the San Carlos Apaches.

LYNN KEY: So, you know, it's KYAY.

Read more
Sports
3:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Nyad Finishes Swimming Goal 35 Years After She First Tried

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The swimmer Diana Nyad has finally accomplished what no other athlete has ever done. She swam 110 miles from Cuba to Florida without a protective shark cage and she did it at the age of 64. As Nyad emerged from the Gulf of Mexico yesterday, he tongue swollen from swallowing sea water, she had messages for the crowd that greeted her.

DIANA NYAD: One is we should never ever give up. Two is you're never too old to chase your dreams.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
Middle East
3:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Iran Weighs Heavily In Debate Over Syria

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

As we've heard, some of the debate over Syria is actually a debate about Syria's ally, Iran. We want to know what Iranian leaders are thinking as the United States contemplates involvement in Syria. And so we've called Scott Peterson, in Istanbul. He's a Christian Science Monitor reporter who's well-known for his coverage of Iran, and author of a book called "Let the Swords Encircle Me," which is about Iran.

Mr. Peterson, welcome to the program.

SCOTT PETERSON: Thank you.

Read more
Environment
1:03 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Pollution, Not Rising Temperatures, May Have Melted Alpine Glaciers

The Alps' largest glacier, Aletsch Glacier, extends more than 14 miles and covers more than 46 square miles.
Wikimedia.org

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 9:28 am

Glaciers in the Alps of Europe pose a scientific mystery. They started melting rapidly back in the 1860s. In a span of about 50 years, some of the biggest glaciers had retreated more than half a mile.

But nobody could explain the glacier's rapid decline. Now, a new study from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory uncovers a possible clue to why the glaciers melted before temperatures started rising: Soot from the Industrial Revolution could have heated up the ice.

Read more
Law
1:02 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Justice Department Tackles Quality Of Defense For The Poor

People wait in line outside the Supreme Court in February. In a landmark decision half a century ago, the justices guaranteed a lawyer for criminal defendants who are too poor to afford one.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 9:37 am

All over the country, lawyers who defend poor people in criminal cases have been sharing their stories about painful budget cuts. Some federal public defenders have shut their doors to new clients after big layoffs. And in many states, the public defense system has operated in crisis for years.

But an unprecedented recent court filing from the Justice Department has cheered the typically overburdened attorneys who represent the poor and could have dramatic implications for the representation of indigent defendants.

Read more
Books
1:01 am
Tue September 3, 2013

For F. Scott And Zelda Fitzgerald, A Dark Chapter In Asheville, N.C.

Zelda Sayre and F. Scott Fitzgerald pose for a photo at the Sayre home in Montgomery, Ala., in 1919, the year before they married.
Bettmann Corbis

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 1:30 pm

Asheville, a mountain town in North Carolina, is known for at least two important native sons: writers Thomas Wolfe, whose 1929 novel Look Homeward, Angel eviscerated some locals, and Charles Frazier, whose 1997 civil war novel Cold Mountain is set in the nearby hills. But there is also a little-known story of another writer — F. Scott Fitzgerald — who, along with his wife Zelda, had devastating connections to the town.

Read more
Animals
12:59 am
Tue September 3, 2013

The Latest In Scientific Field Equipment? Fido's Nose

Rob Finch

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 5:25 pm

Dave Vesely is busy training his dog, Sharpy. She isn't learning to sit or fetch or even herd sheep; Sharpy is learning to find the nests of western pond turtles.

These turtles are sneaky. After laying their eggs in a small hole, they knead together dirt, leaves and their own urine to plug the opening. Once this mud dries, the nest looks like an unremarkable patch of ground.

Read more
Latin America
12:58 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Pena Nieto Encourages Mexicans To Embrace Change

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto presents his first annual report to the nation during a ceremony before the Congress at his presidential residence in Mexico City on Monday.
Omar Torres AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 5:23 pm

Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto says his nation is undergoing a major change — one his country should not fear. Pena Nieto gave an upbeat assessment of his nine-month-old administration in his first State of the Union address on Monday.

Despite his positive review of Mexico's condition, the new president is dealing with chaotic protests in the capital, intractable levels of violence and a less favorable economic outlook than predicted.

He campaigned on the promise of creating a modern and prosperous Mexico. And according to his appraisal, he's done just that.

Read more
NPR Story
5:11 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Coal Industry Takes Teachers For A Class In Mining

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:25 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The coal industry is trying to buff up its image in Texas. Texas is known for oil and gas, but it's also a big coal producer. And mining companies are paying for a boot camp for science teachers that has some educators and parents upset.

Laura Isensee, of member station KUHF in Houston, has more.

(SOUNDBITE OF FOOTSTEPS)

Read more
The Salt
2:50 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Tlacoyos: A Mexican Grilled Snack That Tempted The Conquistadors

Tlacoyos can be filled with beans, potatoes, mushrooms or cheese and are often topped with grilled cactus, onions, cilantro, and salsa.
Jasmine Garsd for NPR

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 12:10 pm

For the last in a summer series of grilled food from around the world, we head to Mexico, where a small doughy treat is found everywhere from street corner grills to high-end restaurants. It's called a tlacoyo (pronounced tla-COY-yo) and although it may sound novel, it's an ancient food that's older than Hernan Cortes.

Read more
NPR Story
2:50 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

On Fifth Try, Diana Nyad Completes Cuba-Florida Swim

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:48 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

After years of unwavering tenacity, Diana Nyad has completed her quest. At 64 years of age, she became the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without a protective shark cage. That is more than a hundred miles of water full of sharks, venomous box jellyfish and treacherous currents.

Read more
NPR Story
2:50 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Verizon To Pay $130 Billion For Stake In Vodafone

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 5:11 pm

Verizon Communications is paying $130 billion to buy part of its wireless unit from the British company Vodafone. It's one of the biggest deals in the history of the telecommunications business and underscores the growing profitability of wireless. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Jim Zarroli about the deal.

The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Syria's Bashar Assad: Show Me The Evidence

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:11 am

A defiant Syrian President Bashar Assad said Monday that the international community has not produced evidence to substantiate claims that his regime used chemical weapons in a deadly attack last month.

Read more
Author Interviews
2:14 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

From Peace To Patriotism: The Shifting Identity Of 'God Bless America'

American composer Irving Berlin sings his song "God Bless America" in front of Boy Scouts troop members and spectators gathered at a tent in Monticello, New York in 1940. Instead of collecting royalties from "God Bless America," Berlin created a fund that collected and distributed them to the Boy and Girl Scouts.
Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:47 am

In the fall of 1938, radio was huge. That Halloween, Orson Welles scared listeners out of their wits with his War of the Worlds. And on November 10, 1938 — the eve of the holiday that was known then as Armistice Day — the popular singer Kate Smith made history on her radio show. She sang a song that had never been sung before, written by the composer Irving Berlin.

Read more
Food
2:12 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Deep-Fry Chefs Keep It Hot And Poppin' In Texas

We had to do it! A fried mic.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 5:11 pm

Every year, the State Fair of Texas awards the most original food that is battered and plunged into a vat of boiling oil.

And it gets weirder every year. The obvious choices came and went in previous competitions — concoctions such as fried ice cream, fried cookie dough and chicken-fried bacon. Now, every year, the same cooks have to top themselves, which is not easy.

Last year, Butch Benavides — a Mexican food restaurateur turned fry-master — won a trophy for his fried bacon cinnamon roll on a stick.

Read more
All Tech Considered
2:12 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Amish Community Not Anti-Technology, Just More Thoughtful

One Amish family in Lancaster County, Pa., has three horse-pulled buggies they store in a barn. They all have electric lights powered by rechargeable batteries. One of the buggies even has battery-powered windshield wipers.
Jeff Brady NPR

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 5:11 pm

Many outsiders assume the Amish reject all new technology. But that's not true.

One Amish man in Lancaster County, Pa., checks his voicemail about four times a day. His shop is equipped with a propane-powered forklift, hydraulic-powered saws, cordless drills, and a refrigerated tank where milk from dairy cows is stored.

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:03 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Enough With Baby Talk; Infants Learn From Lemur Screeches, Too

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 7:26 am

New research suggests that 3-month-old human babies can use lemur calls as teaching aids. The findings hint at a deep biological connection between language and learning.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:21 am
Mon September 2, 2013

On Fifth Try, Diana Nyad Completes Cuba-Florida Swim

United States endurance swimmer Diana Nyad is greeted by a crowd as she walks on to the Key West, Fla., shore today.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 7:59 pm

Updated At 2:06 pm EST. Nyad Reaches Key West:

Jellyfish stings, an asthma attack and sheer exhaustion all stopped Diana Nyad in the past. But on her fifth try, the 64-year-old Nyad became the first person to swim unaided from Cuba to Florida, a distance of more than 100 miles.

With a cheering crowd greeting her on the beach in Key West, Nyad swam ashore Monday afternoon after more than two full days in the water. The swim began Saturday morning when she jumped off a seawall at the Hemingway Marina in Havana.

Read more
Music Interviews
9:03 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Jason Isbell Locates His Musical Compass On 'Southeastern'

Jason Isbell was previously a member of Drive-By Truckers. His solo albums include Sirens of the Ditch and Here We Rest.
Eric England Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 12:26 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on July 17, 2013.

When singer-songwriter Jason Isbell used to get drunk, he'd sometimes tell his then-girlfriend, the musician Amanda Shires, that he needed to quit the bottle — and that if it was going to take, he'd have to go to rehab. Eventually, she said the next time he told her that, she'd hold him to it. And she did. And he went. And, he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "The jury is still out on whether or not it worked, but it worked today and all the days leading up to this."

Read more
Code Switch
6:58 am
Mon September 2, 2013

The History Behind The Phrase 'Don't Be An Indian Giver'

Explorers Lewis and Clark were offended by a trade-gone-wrong and wrote in their journals that the group of Indians they interacted with were "forward and impertinent, and thievish."
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

"You can't take it back! Don't be an Indian giver."

Sound familiar? It's the schoolyard taunt that's been used for generations by children (and others) to describe people so ungenerous that they take back gifts as soon as they are given or immediately demand a present in return.

Comedian Louis CK calls the phrase "one of most offensive things you can call someone."

Read more
All Tech Considered
6:52 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Modifying The Dollhouse: Exposing Girls To Tech Through Play

Youth Radio

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 12:51 pm

Two recent Stanford graduates are trying to get more girls interested in technology — by embedding it in dollhouses.

The founders of Roominate, Alice Brooks and Bettina Chen, took the concept of building toys for girls to a whole new level by adding wires and generators.

Read more

Pages