NPR News

Pages

NPR Story
2:29 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

Wireless Carriers Text 'NO' To Campaign Donations

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 4:06 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Here's a way the candidates would like to be able to raise money - donations via text message. It's something nonprofits already do. The American Red Cross, for example, raised $32 million from texts after the earthquake in Haiti. But, for political campaigns, it's not a reality, not yet. In June, the FEC ruled that campaigns can collect donations from text messages, but wireless carriers still aren't onboard.

Read more
NPR Story
2:29 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

Reviews: 'The Fallen Angel' And 'A Foreign Country'

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 4:06 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

August is here and, for many, that means vacation and a last minute scramble for a good book to pass the quiet hours. Well, take heart. Our reviewer Alan Cheuse has reached deep into his pile of new books and found two spy thrillers, perfect, he says, for brisk summer reading.

Read more
NPR Story
2:29 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

With Annan Out, U.S. Is Pressured To Act In Syria

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 4:06 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

What now? That's the question many in and out of Syria are asking, one day after Kofi Annan announced he's quitting as special envoy to Syria. Annan blamed his resignation, in part, on a divided U.N. Security Council. As NPR's Michele Kelemen reports, activists are now calling on Washington to work around the U.N. and do more to support Syria's rebels.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:46 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

Reuters Says Its Website Was Hacked, Fake Syria Stories Posted

The wire service Reuters says its blogging service was compromised today. The people responsible, Reuters said, took the opportunity to post a fake news story about Syria.

Reuters reports:

"One of the false posts purported to be an interview with Riad al-Asaad, the head of the Free Syrian Army.

"'Reuters did not carry out such an interview and the posting has been deleted,' the Reuters statement said.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:38 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

Experts Find Ancient Mayans May Have Used Chocolate As Condiment

Chocolate.
Philippe Huguen AFP/Getty Images

Archaeologists have made a surprising discovery: They announced they found traces of 2,500-year-old chocolate on a plate as opposed to a cup.

The conclusion they make is that it means ancient Mayans not only drank chocolate but also used it as a condiment.

The AP reports the discovery was made public by Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History.

The AP adds:

Read more
The Torch
1:37 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

Phelps And Franklin Add To Their Medal Totals, And A New Teen Phenom Emerges

American Katie Ledecky seemed to be in disbelief as she hugged bronze medalist Rebecca Adlington of Great Britain. Ledecky, 15, won the women's 800m freestyle by four seconds in London.
Al Bello Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 3:08 pm

In one of the last showcase days for swimming at the 2012 Summer Olympics, American athletes Michael Phelps and Missy Franklin hit the pool at London's aquatic center Friday. Each of them were on a mission to end their individual event schedules with gold medals.

Read more
The Salt
1:03 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

If Almonds Bring You Joy, Enjoy More For Fewer Calories

Almonds may have 20 percent less calories than previously thought.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 9:10 am

Scientists are starting to discover that the standard way of measuring calories, established more than 100 years ago, may not be terribly accurate when it comes to higher fat, high-fiber foods like nuts. But when it comes to almonds, the count may be off by a whole lot.

Food scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture recently published a new study that finds almonds have about 20 percent fewer calories than previously documented.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
12:51 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

More Cases Of New Swine Flu Virus Appear In Three States

Colton Tucker gives water to a pig to be shown at the California State Fair in Sacramento in July. Federal health officials say most of the cases of a new flu virus in Indiana, Ohio and Hawaii after kids came in direct contact with pigs at agricultural fairs.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Federal health officials Friday reported a jump this summer in the number of people who have gotten infected with a new swine flu virus.

Sixteen cases of the new H3N2 swine flu have been confirmed in the last few weeks, including 12 in the last week alone, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

Ten of last week's cases occurred in Ohio, while the two others were in Indiana and Hawaii.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

'Entire World' Has Responded To The $500 Tip 'Last Wish,' Brother Says

Aaron Collins, who wanted to leave a big tip.
Facebook.com/AaronsLastWish

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 4:06 pm

  • Seth Collins on the outpouring of support
  • Seth Collins on what Aaron would think

The positive reaction to "Aaron's Wish" — a young Kentucky man's request that after he died his family give some lucky waiter or waitress an "awesome" tip of at least $500 — continues.

Read more
Space
12:29 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

Planning For 'Curiosity' On Mars

If all goes according to plan, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, nicknamed 'Curiosity,' will touch down on the red planet this weekend following what NASA has called 'seven minutes of terror' during the descent. NPR science correspondent Joe Palca and John Grunsfeld, head of NASA's Science Directorate, give a preview of the mission and talk about what scientists hope to learn from the latest ambassador to Mars.

Technology
12:29 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

Tech Giants Gear Up For Patent Battle

A court battle between Apple and Samsung is underway in California, with each side arguing over intricate patent and trademark claims covering how the companies' phones and tablets work, look, and feel. Robin Feldman, professor at the UC Hastings College of the Law, explains some of the key issues in the court case and how it might affect the technology industry.

Science
11:49 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Making Movies That Zoom Into Foreign Worlds

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 12:29 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

You're listening to SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. A little later in the program, we'll be talking about NASA's landing of its new probe, Curiosity, to the Martian surface. But with us now is Flora Lichtman with our Video Pick of the Week. Hi, Flora.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Ira.

FLATOW: This is a soothing...

(LAUGHTER)

FLATOW: I mean, I saw the video pick. It's so soothing, although it's on a topic that you wouldn't think is soothing at all.

Read more
The Torch
11:33 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Going To The Games: A Spectator's View Of The London Olympics

Tickets to London 2012 events come with a travel pass.
Madhulika Sikka NPR

To find out what the London Olympics are like for the average fan, we asked Morning Edition executive producer Madhulika Sikka — a Brit who's vacationing in London — to describe it for us. Sikka received tickets through the lottery.

Congratulations, you've secured tickets for an Olympic event, and London 2012 awaits you. So, what's it like to navigate a city that has been bracing itself for the throng of Olympic visitors?

Read more
Environment
11:30 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Changing Views About A Changing Climate

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 12:29 pm

What is the role of humans in climate change? "Call me a converted skeptic," physicist Richard Muller wrote in an Op-Ed in the New York Times this week, describing his analysis of data from the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature project. Though Muller was once a notable skeptic regarding studies connecting human activity to climate change, he has now concluded that "humans are almost entirely the cause" of global warming.

NPR Story
11:28 am
Fri August 3, 2012

One Doc's Prescription For Hassle-Free Healthcare

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 12:29 pm

Dr. Jay Parkinson envisions a future of more efficient, hassle-free healthcare--and it starts online. He says he and his colleagues at the New York City-based healthcare start-up Sherpaa can solve 70 percent of patients' problems via email, eliminating a trip to the doctor's office.

NPR Story
11:28 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Spending The Holidays At A Toxic Waste Site

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 12:29 pm

To avoid the crowds at Niagara Falls, why not sail the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, or ogle oil refineries in Port Arthur, Texas? In Visit Sunny Chernobyl: And Other Adventures In The World's Most Polluted Places, Andrew Blackwell describes traveling to the world's most contaminated destinations.

The Two-Way
11:14 am
Fri August 3, 2012

After Aurora Shooting, A Couple Decides To Finish Watching 'Dark Knight'

The Century 16 movie theatre is seen from a memorial setup across the street in Aurora, Colorado.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 11:23 am

Jacqueline Keavney Lader and Don Lader survived the Aurora shooting. But the day after, the military couple did something courageous: They returned to an area theater to finish watching the latest Batman film, The Dark Knight Rises.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:13 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Same News, Different Spins: Check These Headlines About The Jobs Report

Different takes on the same story.
FoxNews.com and NBCNews.com

Our headline all day has been "163,000 Jobs Added In July; Unemployment Rate Rose To 8.3 Percent."

But as is often the case, some other news outlets like to add a little bit of interpretation to their headlines:

-- Fox News says "Wrong-Way Growth: Jobless Jumps
In July as New Hiring Remains Slow
."

Read more
Remembrances
11:09 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Fresh Air Remembers Writer And Critic Gore Vidal

Gore Vidal authored the historical novels Burr and Lincoln, wrote plays and provocative essays, ran for office twice — and lost — and frequently appeared on TV talk shows. His play The Best Man currently has a revival on Broadway.
AP

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 1:03 pm

In Gore Vidal's New York Times obituary, Charles McGrath described the writer as "the elegant, acerbic all around man of letters who presided with a certain relish over what he declared to be the end of American civilization." Vidal died Tuesday at the age of 86.

Read more
It's All Politics
10:55 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Latest Jobs Data Maintain Status Quo Of Obama-Romney Race

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 12:10 pm

(Revised @ 1:48 pm ET)

With only three monthly jobs reports left before Nov. 6, President Obama needs every piece of good economic news he can get to add to his argument for re-election.

Friday's employment report certainly provided some. The Labor Department reported that the economy added an unexpectedly strong 163,000 jobs in July. Forecasters had predicted that the economy would add as many as 100,000 jobs, so the report took most everyone by surprise.

Read more
'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
10:53 am
Fri August 3, 2012

It's All Politics, Aug. 2, 2012

Uriel Sinai Getty Images

Holy mackerel, it's the holy site edition of the podcast. NPR's Ron Elving and Ken Rudin look back at the memorable — and controversial — moments of Mitt Romney's foreign trip, and then look ahead to the upcoming Republican and Democratic conventions.

Also, a new Tea Party star is born in the Lone Star State.

Author Interviews
10:41 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Crum: Lee Maynard's 'Love Letter' To His Hometown

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 1:10 pm

Lee Maynard's 1988 semi-autobiographical novel Crum is set in the small, poor West Virginia town where he grew up. The people of Crum who know the book tend to love it or hate it. It was even banned for several years in a state-run store. The sequel, Screaming With the Cannibals, which came out five years later, got his protagonist Jesse Stone out of West Virginia, across the Tug River into Kentucky.

Read more
Participation Nation
10:33 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Making Connections In Durham, N.C.

People lend a hand to others at the Project Homeless Connection.
Courtesy of PHC

This month we are collecting your stories about the good things Americans are doing to make their community a better place. Some of your contributions will become blog posts and the project will end with a story that weaves together submissions to make a story of Americans by Americans for Americans.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:22 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Report: Charity Founded By Jerry Sandusky Drops Investigation

A sign for The Second Mile charity is seen outside the organization's headquarters in State College, Pa., in November of 2011.
Genaro C. Armas AP

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 3:06 pm

The Philadelphia Inquirer is reporting that Second Mile, the foundation set up by Jerry Sandusky, is dropping an expansive internal investigation.

The charity had decided to close up shop after Sandusky was convicted of 45 criminal counts related to the sexual abuse of young boys.

The Inquirer reports that chief executive David Woodle said the decision to close shop means there is no need for an extensive investigation.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
10:20 am
Fri August 3, 2012

The Science Behind Olympic Six-Pack Abs

Swimmers Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte deploy their muscles to win medals for the United States at the 2012 London Olympic Games.
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 2:27 pm

Every four years, we look forward to watching the jaw-dropping athleticism of the Summer Olympic Games. But — let's be frank — we also tune in to ogle the athletes' impressively toned physiques.

Read more
The Torch
9:54 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Federer Wins Epic Semifinal, Taking More Than Four Hours To Do So

Roger Federer of Switzerland returns a shot against Juan Martin Del Potro of Argentina in their Olympic semifinal played at Wimbledon. Federer won the match, which took more than 4 hours to play.
Clive Brunskill Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 10:25 am

Swiss tennis star Roger Federer kept his Olympic dream alive Friday, when he won the longest tennis singles match in Olympic history. He defeated Juan Del Potro of Argentina, in a semifinal played on Wimbledon's Centre Court.

The final score of the three-set match, which lasted more than four hours and 20 minutes, was 3-6, 7-6, 19-17. Federer will next face the winner of Friday's semifinal between Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic in the final.

Read more
Planet Money
9:37 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Actually, The U.S. Lost 1.2 Million Jobs Last Month

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 1:02 pm

Everyone (including us) is saying this morning that the U.S. economy gained 163,000 jobs last month. Strictly speaking, this is a lie.

In fact, the U.S. economy actually lost 1.2 million jobs last month. There were 134.1 million jobs in June, and 132.9 million jobs in July. (The numbers are in this PDF.)

Read more
The Two-Way
9:11 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Stories Of The Colorado Victims: Thinking Of Alex Teves, 'You Smile'

In Aurora, Colo., last week, among the memorials to victims of the shooting was one for Alex Teves. It includes a photo of him with girlfriend Amanda Lindgren. Teves protected her with his body.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 9:40 am

As they're being told, we're pointing to some of the stories about the 12 people who died and the 58 who were wounded when a gunman opened fire on July 20 at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo. Click here to see more. As you see others, please share the links in the comment threads.

Read more
The Salt
8:59 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Canning History: When Propaganda Encouraged Patriotic Preserves

During World War II, the government used posters to encourage Americans to grow and preserve their own foods as a way to aid the war effort. Produced by the Office of War Information in 1943.
Northwestern University Libraries

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 9:11 am

Recently, home canning has seen a rush in popularity, and even upscale retailers like Williams-Sonoma want a share of the idea that a pint of home-canned jam is a fun gift idea. But during both world wars, canning saw another surge, this time prompted by colorful propaganda sponsored by the United States government.

Read more
The Torch
8:54 am
Fri August 3, 2012

Olympics Energize Britain's Patriots, Even (Perhaps) In Scotland

Great Britain, By Jingo!: Fans cheer Team GB at a rowing event in Windsor, England.
Quinn Rooney Getty Images

Any claim the British have to their fabled "stiff upper lip" is being destroyed by these Olympic Games. The Brits' lips are wobbling like jellies; their tears are flowing faster than the summer rain; their crowds are cheering themselves hoarse.

Read more

Pages