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Environment
3:17 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

How A Texas Town Became Water Smart

An area in San Antonio's Brackenridge Park where treated wastewater is pumped into the San Antonio River, one of many measures the city has taken to combat drought.
Mose Buchele StateImpact Texas

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:02 am

Faced with a booming population and a disappearing water supply, the city of San Antonio responded by dramatically cutting consumption, pioneering new storage techniques and investing in water recycling and desalination projects. It now boasts that it is "Water's Most Resourceful City."

There are so many programs and projects that Chuck Ahrens of Water Resources and Conservation with the San Antonio Water System can hardly keep track.

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Wish You Were Here: My Favorite Destination
3:17 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Wish You Were Here: Listening To Loons In Maine

Hearing the call of the loons is like "a blessing."
Flickr

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:02 am

Writer Roxana Robinson's most recent novel, Cost, is set in Maine.

Mount Desert Island, off the coast of northern Maine, is known for dramatic scenery. Most of the island is Acadia National Park: steep forests, plunging down to a cobalt sea. Cadillac Mountain, the tallest peak, is the first place where light touches the American continent, each morning at dawn. Trails follow the windswept ridges; they wind along the smooth pink granite bluffs, rising from the deep, icy water, along the wild swirl of the great tides.

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The Two-Way
3:16 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

James Holmes, Colorado Shooting Suspect, Is Mentally Ill, His Attorneys Say

The attorneys for the James Holmes, the alleged Colorado shooter, say their client is mentally ill.

The AP reports the disclosure came during a hearing today at the Arapahoe (Colo.) County Courthouse in which news organizations, including NPR, were asking for documents in the case to be unsealed.

The AP adds:

"Holmes had the same dazed demeanor that he has had in previous court appearances.

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The Two-Way
3:04 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Ashton Eaton, Of United States, Wins Gold In Decathlon

Ashton Eaton of the United States smiles after competing in the Men's Decathlon Pole Vault in London.
Feng Li Getty Images

(This post appeared in our Olympics blog, The Torch.)

The American Ashton Eaton can call himself the greatest athlete in the world, today.

With 8,869 points, Eaton took the gold medal in the decathlon. His American teammate Trey Hardee took the silver with 8,671 points.

If you're not familiar, the decathlon is the closest the sports world comes to a standardized test in athletic ability. It spans two days and 10 events, including the 100 meter dash, the long jump, the high jump and the shot put.

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The Torch
3:01 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Ashton Eaton, Of United States, Wins Gold In Decathlon

Ashton Eaton of the United States smiles after competing in the Men's Decathlon Pole Vault in London.
Feng Li Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 2:58 pm

The American Ashton Eaton can call himself the greatest athlete in the world, today.

With 8,869 points, Eaton took the gold medal in the decathlon. His American teammate Trey Hardee took the silver with 8,671 points.

If you're not familiar, the decathlon is the closest the sports world comes to a standardized test in athletic ability. It spans two days and 10 events, including the 100 meter dash, the long jump, the high jump and the shot put.

The final event is the 1,500 meter run. It's a grueling final metric mile. Eaton finished it easily with a time of 4:35.

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NPR Story
2:44 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Doubts Emerge Over Egypt's Offensive In Sinai

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:02 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

When Egypt launched military operations earlier this week against Islamist extremists in the lawless Sinai Peninsula, they were described as the biggest in the area in decades. The move came after 16 Egyptian soldiers were killed in an ambush at their border post. State media outlets speaking for the government reported air strikes that killed more than 20 militants. They also reported ground troops moving into villages long off limits to the country's security forces.

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NPR Story
2:44 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Obama Talks Clean Energy, Latino Issues In Colorado

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:02 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. President Obama barnstormed through Colorado today holding rallies in Pueblo and Colorado Springs. It's his second full day in the state, one of a handful of battlegrounds that could decide the November election. As NPR's Scott Horsley reports, the president touted his support for clean energy and reached out to Colorado's growing Latino population.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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The Torch
2:11 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Usain Bolt Cements His Place In History, Winning 200 Meter Gold

Usain Bolt of Jamaica crosses the finish line ahead of Yohan Blake of Jamaica to win gold during the Men's 200m Final.
Cameron Spencer Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:02 am

Usain Bolt cemented his place as one of the greatest sprinters in history, when he won the 200 meter final today.

Bolt was challenged by his Jamaican teammate Yohan Blake, who closed in with less than 100 meters to go. Bolt kicked on his burners and ended up taking back the lead and beating Blake 19.32 to 19.44 seconds.

The big deal here is that this makes Bolt the first Olympian to win both the 100 meter and 200 meter races two Olympics in a row.

Warren Weir, another Jamaican, took third.

The AP adds:

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Shots - Health Blog
1:32 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Gonorrhea Evades Antibiotics, Leaving Only One Drug To Treat Disease

Health officials say they're worried that one day there will be no more antibiotics left to treat gonorrhea.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:02 am

There's some disturbing news out today about a disease we don't hear about much these days: gonorrhea. Federal health officials announced that the sexually transmitted infection is getting dangerously close to being untreatable.

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The Two-Way
1:14 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Thanks For Nothing, Stephen: Colbert Spoils The Wiki Veep Indicator

Buzz Killer.
Mike Coppola Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 10:11 am

Well, tracking changes to prominent politicians' Wikipedia pages had been one way of trying to get advance notice of Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney's vice presidential pick.

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Movie Interviews
12:48 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Chris Rock On The Funny Business Of Finding Success

"I don't believe I can offend you in a comedy club," Rock says. Star comedians use comedy clubs to try out new material. "I think that's the deal that's made when you see a famous guy in one of these clubs."
Michael Parmelee Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 1:01 pm

How much funny family dysfunction can you pack into two days? Plenty, if you're Mingus and Marion (Chris Rock and Julie Delpy) an interracial, multinational Manhattan couple — each with kids from previous relationships — hosting Marion's family visiting from France. The film, 2 Days in New York, is a sequel to Delpy's 2007 film, 2 Days in Paris.

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Politics
12:45 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Iowa, Key To Obama's 2008 Win, Now Divided

Signs of the drought in central Iowa are apparent just off the road in Marion County. A vast majority of farmers are protected from crop losses with federally backed insurance.
Liz Halloran NPR

The line at the cavernous Smokey Row Coffee House in Oskaloosa stretched out the door and down the block, so long that dozens of Iowans waiting to see presidential candidate Barack Obama had to settle for a peek through the windows.

It was July 4, 2007, heady days for Obama in the Hawkeye State, where Democratic caucusgoers would soon launch him as a legitimate national contender, and where state voters would later turn out in record numbers to help put the first-term Illinois senator into the White House.

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The Two-Way
12:44 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

VIDEO: NASA Moon Lander Crashes And Burns During Test Flight

A screengrab of NASA's moon lander in flames.
NASA

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 12:57 pm

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All Tech Considered
12:38 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Report From The Drone Convention: Unmanned Vehicles Find New Uses

Brian Bills, a flight operations analyst for Lockheed Martin, demonstrates the Procerus VTOL (vertical takeoff and landing) Flight System — a surveillance drone for commercial, civil and military customers — at the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International conference in Las Vegas. (Watch a demo video.)
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 1:33 pm

Drone makers and robotics manufacturers are looking for — and finding — new uses for devices that were once limited to the worlds of science and the military.

After a decade of explosive growth, thanks largely to the post-Sept. 11 demand from the military for unmanned vehicles, the industry is eagerly awaiting the opening of a new front: the domestic drone market.

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The Torch
12:35 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Women's Olympic Soccer Final: U.S. Beats Japan 2-1, To Win Gold

American Carli Lloyd heads in a goal in the first half to put the U.S. up 1-0 against Japan in the Olympic gold medal match.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:08 am

In Olympic women's soccer, the U.S. team has beaten Japan, 2-1, in the gold medal match at London's Wembley Stadium, a game that set a new attendance record with more than 80,000 spectators. Carli Lloyd scored both of the American goals, while U.S. stars Alex Morgan and Abby Wambach weren't able to finish their chances. But they were very active, and both players kept the Japanese defenders occupied around the goal.

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The Two-Way
12:30 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

After Tragedy For Sikhs, A Glimpse Into 'The Sunshine of Their Minds'

Sikhs and others who wanted to show support gathered Wednesday night for a vigil in Manhattan.
Mario Tama Getty Images
  • Ambassador Nirupama Rao on 'Tell Me More'

Out of the horror of Sunday's shooting at a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis., has come a window into "the sunshine of their minds," India's ambassador to the U.S. says about faithful Sikhs.

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The Two-Way
12:24 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Shannon Eastin Set To Become First Female To Officiate NFL Game

In this photo taken on Saturday, Aug. 4, 2012, and provided by the Seattle Seahawks, NFL official Shannon Eastin works during the Seahawks NFL football training camp in Renton, Wash.
Rod Mar AP

Tonight, Shannon Eastin will break a gender barrier: The line judge will become the first woman to officiate an NFL game.

In a conference call today, she told the AP she wasn't intimidated.

"I want to encourage women: Don't be afraid," Eastin said. "Pursue and have dreams. This is my dream. With very step I hope to show it really doesn't matter if you are male or female."

The thing is that Eastin is stepping into the role during a difficult time. She is a replacement official because the regular officials are currently locked out because of a labor dispute.

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The Salt
12:16 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Maryland Dairy Farmers Scoop Up A Sweet New Source Of Income

A girl checks out the options at Rocky Point Creamery in Tuscarora, Md., one of seven farms on the state's ice cream trail.
Ebony Bailey NPR

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 9:06 am

Some enterprising dairy farmers in rural Maryland have found a new source of income — opening ice cream shops on their farms. This summer, seven of them have come together to form Maryland's Best Ice Cream Trail, the nation's first farm-based ice cream trail. And the results so far seem pretty sweet.

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Science
11:46 am
Thu August 9, 2012

Paleontologists Unearth Possible Pre-Human Fossils

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 12:30 pm

Fossils discovered in East Africa suggest that Homo erectus, the species believed to be humans' direct ancestor, may have shared Earth with two genetically distinct but similar species. Some paleontologists believe that these species may be distant relatives to modern humans, while others need more evidence.

Shots - Health Blog
11:45 am
Thu August 9, 2012

Justice Department Looks For Ways To Recruit Forensic Pathologists

Dr. Amy Tharp, a forensic pathologist, explains gun shot wounds on an anatomical model during her testimony in Bedford, Va. in March 2010.
Kim Raff AP

Television crime dramas may draw big audiences, but they don't seem to work as a recruiting tool for forensic pathologists.

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NPR Story
11:43 am
Thu August 9, 2012

What The Future Holds For Cuba's Economy

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 12:08 pm

In Cuba, President Raul Castro has plans to reform the economy, but many challenges lie ahead before the country can move forward. Many of the changes are being implemented slowly because of resistance from within the Communist Party.

NPR Story
11:43 am
Thu August 9, 2012

Weighing The Benefits Of Studying Abroad

Though many colleges and universities urge their students to study abroad, there is little research on the actual benefits.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:33 am

In our increasingly interconnected world and global economy, the opportunity to study abroad seems like a particularly valuable experience. College students are urged to take advantage of study abroad programs to expand horizons and gain enriching cross-cultural experiences.

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NPR Story
11:43 am
Thu August 9, 2012

The Media, National Security And Leaks

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 12:19 pm

Bipartisan legislation approved in late July by the Senate Intelligence Committee includes anti-leak provisions designed to curb disclosure of national security information. This legislation, and an ongoing FBI inquiry into U.S. intelligence leaks, have raised questions about the relationship between reporters and sources.

The Torch
11:15 am
Thu August 9, 2012

Michigan's Claressa Shields Wins Historic Gold Medal In Women's Boxing

U.S. boxer Claressa Shields (left) lands a punch on Nadezda Torlopova of Russia during the women's boxing middleweight final at the ExCel Arena in London. Shields, 17, won the first-ever gold medal in the event.
Jack Guez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 1:59 pm

She's still in high school, but boxer Claressa Shields, 17, is also an Olympic gold medalist, after she won her middleweight final Thursday. She defeated Russia's Nadezda Torlopova by a score of 19-12.

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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Thu August 9, 2012

Despite El Niño, NOAA Increases Hurricane Season Prediction

Hurricane Ernesto before making landfall in Mexico.
NOAA

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 11:47 am

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said today that the chance for a more active than normal hurricane season has increased since it issued its first prediction in May.

NOAA is now predicting 12 to 17 named storms and five to eight hurricanes. Two or three of those could become major hurricanes. In May, NOAA had predicted 9 to 15 storms.

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Planet Money
10:45 am
Thu August 9, 2012

The Marijuana Trade In The Euro's Birthplace

Marijuana in Maastricht
Ermindo Armino AP

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 8:26 am

Zoe Chace and Robert Smith are reporting from European borders this week. This is the second story in a four-part series.

Maastricht, a town in the Netherlands, is known largely for two things.

  1. The treaty that created the euro was signed there.
  2. Marijuana is legal there, and it's sold at "coffee shops" around town.

This is the story of the troubled relationship between those two claims to fame.

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The Two-Way
10:36 am
Thu August 9, 2012

Google Settles Over Safari Privacy Breach; Will Pay Record $22.5M Fine

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 11:05 am

As several news outlets had predicted last month would happen, Google is going to pay $22.5 million — the largest civil penalty the Federal Trade Commission has ever levied — to settle charges that it wasn't straight with users of Apple's Safari browser about how it would track their Web surfing.

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Participation Nation
10:33 am
Thu August 9, 2012

Healing The Bay In Santa Monica, Calif.

A volunteer picks up trash at a Nothin' But Sand beach cleanup.
Courtesy of Heal The Bay

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 10:59 am

Clean is a relative term, says Eveline Bravo, programs manager for Heal the Bay, a nonprofit pro-environment organization hellbent on restoring Santa Monica Bay.

"There's so much Styrofoam and plastic and it's hard to feel like you're not just making small dents."

Yet every third Saturday, Bravo — along with hundreds of other volunteers — shows up at designated beaches with buckets in hand.

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Strange News
9:49 am
Thu August 9, 2012

It's Not Gold, But Fastest US Texter Wins Big

It may not be an Olympic sport, but Wisconsin teen Austin Wierschke was just named the fastest texter in America. The texting champion was awarded $50,000. Wierschke speaks with host Michel Martin about how he keeps his thumbs in shape.

Asia
9:49 am
Thu August 9, 2012

Sikh Temple Shooting Felt Across The World

The Sikh temple shooting in Wisconsin shook up the American Sikh community, but it also shocked people in India. The Indian Ambassador to the U.S., Nirupama Rao just returned from Wisconsin, and she's been discussing the tragedy with U.S. officials. Rao talks with host Michel Martin about what role she can play in the aftermath of the shooting.

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