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Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court essentially punted on extreme partisan gerrymandering Monday, declining to address the central questions at the heart of whether the practice is constitutional.

The court took up two cases, one out of Wisconsin and one out of Maryland, with lines drawn by both parties.

It declared that the plaintiffs in Wisconsin don't have standing to sue, because they didn't try to prove that their vote had been diluted in their own district.

Updated at 12:20 p.m. ET

Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong took ownership of the Los Angeles Times in style with a full-page note to his readers and his new employees on Sunday.

Soon-Shiong bought the newspaper from its former corporate owners, the Chicago-based Tronc newspaper company. NPR spoke to Soon-Shiong about his ambitions for the newspaper.

Updated at 12:35 p.m. ET

"We do not have a policy of separating families at the border. Period," Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen says, as top Trump administration officials call out critics of its "zero tolerance" policy that calls for separating families who cross the border illegally.

When Congress approved giving $380 million to states to bolster the security of their elections, state officials were caught off guard but extremely grateful. Elections are notoriously underfunded and haven't seen a windfall like this from the federal government in more than a decade.

But getting that money out to all the states, and then into the hands of localities that run the elections, with enough time to have a meaningful effect on the 2018 midterm elections is a difficult proposition.

At least five people are dead and more than a dozen injured after a high speed chase by U.S. Border Patrol agents and local sheriff deputies in south Texas ended in a fatal car crash on Sunday.

Dimmit County Sheriff Marion Boyd told the Associated Press 14 people had been crammed into the car and that the driver lost control as it was fleeing Border Patrol agents topping 100 mph near Big Wells, Texas.

"From what we can tell the vehicle ran off the road and caught gravel and then tried to recorrect," Boyd said, adding that "caused the vehicle to turn over several times."

A magnitude 6.1 earthquake rocked the Osaka region of western Japan on Monday morning, killing at least three people and injuring more than 300 others, NHK reported.

The temblor struck shortly after 8 a.m. local time causing severe damage to roads, bursting water mains and setting fires across the prefecture.

Ben Zimmerman lives in a suburb of Chicago. Like a lot of 9-year-olds, he's fond of YouTube, Roblox, and Minecraft.

And, like a lot of parents, his mom and dad wanted to make sure Ben wasn't spending too much time on those activities. They tried to use Google's "Family Link" parental control software to limit screen time for Ben and his older sister, Claudia.

Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz and FBI Director Christopher Wray will head to Capitol Hill Monday for an expected grilling from senators about the inspector general's scathing report on the FBI's mishandling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation in 2016.

Rita Adele Steyn's mother had a double mastectomy in her 40s because she had so many lumps in her breasts. Her first cousin died of breast cancer. And Steyn's sister is going through chemotherapy for the disease now. Steyn worries she might be next.

"Sometimes you feel like you beat the odds. And sometimes you feel like the odds are against you," said Steyn, 42, who lives in Tampa, Fla. "And right now I feel like the odds are against me."

On Sunday, Colombia elected a new president, Ivan Duque, a conservative former senator who's pledged to rewrite a divisive peace treaty that ended the country's 50-year-old guerrilla war.

In the second and final round of elections, Duque won 54 percent of the vote, defeating former guerrilla fighter and onetime Bogota mayor Gustavo Petro, 58, who captured about 42 percent in the runoff.

There's no shortage nowadays of competitors for your entertainment dollar. On-demand television, games on your phone, even workouts, sports or cooking videos streamed into your home are all a click or swipe away.

In Lexington, Tenn., one century-old, one-screen theater is taking a decidedly homegrown approach to winning over — and keeping — its customers, and it involves a 50-year-old popcorn machine.

The number of men in the United States who are full-time, stay-at-home parents has risen steadily in recent decades, from maybe a million or so in 1984, according to a Pew Research Center estimate, to roughly double that in 2014.

That's still much smaller than the number of stay-at-home moms, of course, and many of the challenges these dads face are universal to parenting.

Updated at 4:28 p.m. ET

The Trump administration's decision to separate children from their families as a way to curb illegal immigration is adding fuel to an already fiery debate over immigration.

A group of House Democrats converged on an immigration detention facility in New Jersey on Sunday, days before a planned vote by House Republicans next week. Meanwhile, Trump administration officials alternately took credit and sought to distance the administration from the family separation policy.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

With chants of "families united" and "free our children now," hundreds of people marched to the tent city in Tornillo, Texas, where children have been detained for immigration violations.

The Father's Day march near El Paso was primarily organized by Democratic Rep. Beto O'Rourke of Texas, who is also running for Senate against Ted Cruz. He says the march was the brainchild of Veronica Escobar, who is running to fill his seat in the House, as well as other community leaders.

In her first interview since resigning in May, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico, Roberta Jacobson, gives a blistering critique of the Trump administration's "zero-tolerance" immigration agenda. Jacobson tells NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro enforcement actions that result in children being separated from their parents, as well as a recent decision to narrow the definition of what qualifies someone for asylum, are "draconian" and "un-American."

Tom Krall lives on St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands on the west end of the island, high on a ridge. That's where he was in September when Hurricane Irma roared through.

"We had the full blast," Krall says. "Twenty of the 30 houses in my neighborhood lost their roofs or worse."

The National Hurricane Center says Irma had sustained winds of 185 mph when it hit the Virgin Islands with gusts of 200 mph or higher. They were the most powerful winds ever recorded in that part of the Caribbean.

The women are mostly in their early 20s. They have children at home. Selling betel nut — an addictive, natural chew — to passersby in mountain towns of Papua New Guinea is a good way to earn a living.

But the extra income sometimes comes at a heavy price: violent beatings by their spouses. Two out of three women in Papua New Guinea experience abuse at the hands of an intimate partner at least once in their lifetime, according to the World Health Organization and aid groups.

At least 17 people died in a stampede at a nightclub in Caracas, Venezuela early Saturday morning, Venezuela's interior minister said.

More than 500 young people were inside the club when a tear gas canister went off, Interior Minister Nestor Reverol said on Twitter.

He said eight minors were among the dead and at least five people were injured, three of whom were minors.

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani announced on Saturday that his government's ceasefire with the Taliban will be extended another day, even as a suicide bombing killed and injured dozens.

A Trump administration policy of separating children from their parents on the U.S. border has prompted a crescendo of criticism among religious leaders.

They span different faiths, denominations and ages. Some of them have also helped the president gain support for his base.

At some point, they were in love.

At least it looks as if they were in a photo that captures Emile Cilliers and his wife, Victoria, in what seems to be a moment of joy. He is dressed in a tuxedo and bow tie and has a closed-mouthed smile. She is wearing a deep blue halter with dangling earrings that match. Her smile is broad, and her arm is wrapped around his neck.

But the evidence — texts, emails and botched murder attempts — suggest that moment was ephemeral.

Deborah Epstein has spent her professional life fighting for victims of domestic violence. But protecting such victims is also what Epstein says led her to step down from a commission meant to tackle the issue of domestic violence in the National Football League.

Three months ago the students from South Florida established themselves as a potent force in the gun debate with the March For Our Lives rally. This summer they're hitting the road with a new mission: turn the wave of young activism they helped spark into an energized voting bloc for the November mid-term elections.

At the annual end-of-year peace march in Chicago, organized by St. Sabina Catholic Church, Grammy-winners Chance the Rapper and Jennifer Hudson, along with former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, joined the Parkland survivors to launch a bus tour called Road to Change.

Thirty-eight calves, between two and four months old, moo and kick at the dirt floor in a steel barn in Brush, Colo. One by one, a handler leads them from the pen to a narrow chute, where their legs are restrained and they're lifted onto a hydraulic table.

Emily Freeman, a writer in Montana, grew up unaffiliated to a religion — culturally Jewish on her father's side, a smattering of churchgoing on her mother's. She and her husband Nathan Freeman talked about not identifying as religious — but they didn't really discuss how it would affect their parenting.

"I think we put it in the big basket of things that we figured we had so much time to think about," Emily joked.

But then they had kids, and the kids came home from their grandfather's house talking about Bible stories.

The Department of Homeland Security says 1,995 minors were separated from their "alleged adult guardians" at the southern border in just over a monthlong period.

A DHS spokesman said the separations occurred between April 19 and the end of May under the administration's relatively new "zero tolerance" policy, in which parents have also been arrested.

This week in the Russia investigations: A Justice Department report impacts Washington like a meteor; the inspector general confirms the presence of likely fraudulent intelligence; a special agent's words could be a political gift to President Trump.

Aftermath

Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz has painted his masterpiece.

Want to know what the teenagers in your life really think about sex and drugs?

Are you sure?

Well, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have a pretty good idea, thanks to the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Every other year, thousands of teens in public and private high schools across the country take this nationally representative survey. The CDC just released results for 2017, and here are a few of the highlights:

Sex

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Curriculum changes for AP World History

This week, educators and students expressed their opposition to the College Board's decision to cut out parts of the Advanced Placement World History curriculum.

The College Board announced in May that it was removing early world history from the nationally taught high school course. Starting in 2019, the AP World History exam will only assess content from 1450 to the present.

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