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The Salt
5:47 am
Wed August 20, 2014

Urban Farms Build Resilience Within Singapore's Fragile Food System

A crew of volunteer "aunties" weed and harvest basil at the ComCrop rooftop farm, set high above Singapore's Orchard Road.
Maureen Pao NPR

Originally published on

At a local FairPrice Supermarket in central Singapore, you'll find baby carrots grown in Bakersfield, Calif., – the same ones for sale at my local grocery store in Washington, D.C.

Such well-traveled vegetables aren't unusual in the tiny island-state, which imports more than 90 percent of its food from some 35 countries. Singapore may be one of the most affluent countries in the world, but it depends heavily on others for basic foodstuffs.

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The Two-Way
5:30 am
Wed August 20, 2014

Video Purports To Show Beheading Of U.S. Journalist By Militants

James Foley in Aleppo, Syria, in September 2012.
Manu Brabo/freejamesfoley.org AP

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:08 am

Extremist group the Islamic State claims to have executed American journalist James Foley, who was abducted in Syria in 2012. The FBI is evaluating a video that was posted online Tuesday, purporting to show Foley's beheading.

That video was uploaded to YouTube on Tuesday afternoon and later removed. The images show a man resembling Foley kneeling next to a masked militant, reciting comments against the U.S. before being killed.

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Krulwich Wonders...
5:03 am
Wed August 20, 2014

If You're Born In The Sky, What's Your Nationality? An Airplane Puzzler

Robert Krulwich NPR

Here's a puzzle I bet you've never pondered.

Imagine you are very, very pregnant. For the purposes of this mind game, you are a married American woman (with an American spouse) and you are about to board a plane and, pregnant as you are, they let you on.

Your flight, on Lufthansa Airlines, will leave Frankfurt, Germany and travel nonstop to the Maldive Islands in the Indian Ocean. Germany is cold, wet and unhappy-making, and you crave the aquamarine waters, the balmy skies of the Maldives.

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Around the Nation
5:02 am
Wed August 20, 2014

Missing: Bag Of Money Left On Roof Of Armored Car

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 5:27 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Asia
3:24 am
Wed August 20, 2014

Hello Kitty Joins The Space Race

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:07 am
Wed August 20, 2014

Vodquila Gets Attention From Prestigious Competition

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:06 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:07 am
Wed August 20, 2014

Latest Cease-Fire In Gaza Collapses

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 4:48 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:07 am
Wed August 20, 2014

Malls Find New Ways To Draw Shoppers

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 4:43 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:07 am
Wed August 20, 2014

Chicago's All-Black Little League Team Enhances City's Image

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 4:50 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
3:07 am
Wed August 20, 2014

Reporting On Ebola: An Abandoned 10-Year-Old, A Nervous Neighborhood

A 10-year-old boy suspected of being sick with Ebola was found naked on the beach by residents of West Point. They dressed him but couldn't find a clinic to take him in at first. Eventually he was was taken to JFK Hospital in Monrovia.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:04 am

Monrovia, the capital of Liberia, is under nighttime curfew as that country struggles to contain the Ebola epidemic. On Wednesday, an entire neighborhood in Monrovia was quarantined, sealed off from the rest of the city by the government. The neighborhood is called West Point and it's where a holding center for patients suspected of having Ebola was attacked over the weekend. Patients fled, and looters carried off bloody mattresses and other possibly infected supplies. The NPR team in Liberia visited West Point on Tuesday. We spoke to correspondent Nurith Aizenman about the experience.

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Politics
1:36 am
Wed August 20, 2014

With Ferguson, Obama Forced To Confront Race Yet Again

President Barack Obama meets with Attorney General Eric Holder in the Oval Office of the White House on August 18, 2014.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 3:07 am

The tense situation in Ferguson, Mo., following the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown, is another test for President Obama. He's struggled at times over how to navigate long-simmering tensions between police and the African-American community.

President Obama says he understands the passions and the anger that have engulfed Ferguson over the last week and a half, but he's carefully avoided taking sides. His warnings against violent confrontation have been directed equally at the protesters and the police.

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NPR Ed
1:34 am
Wed August 20, 2014

A Tale Of Two Polls

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 3:07 am

Two new polls this week attempt to quantify the public's feelings for the Common Core State Standards. The K-12 benchmarks in English and math were little known this time last year. But they've since become the subject of a high-profile political fight. Now a majority of the public opposes them.

Or do they?

Poll Number One, out today, puts support for the Core at just 33%. But Poll Number Two, released yesterday, puts it at 53%. That's a big difference.

Which one is wrong? Or can they both, somehow, be right?

PDK/Gallup

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Around the Nation
1:33 am
Wed August 20, 2014

Gay Rights Movement Tackles Cultural Battle In The Deep South

Human Rights Campaign, a national gay rights group, launched a grassroots effort to make the Deep South's culture more accepting of gays and lesbians. Brad Clark discusses their work in Mississippi.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 3:07 am

Mercedes Ricks may be the perfect candidate to help launch a new cultural push in Magnolia, Miss.The 50-year-old native of Columbia ended up in this tiny south Mississippi town by way of New Orleans nine years ago.

"I met these ladies from here," Ricks says after greeting guests in the barroom next to her Mariposa restaurant. "They invited me to come spend the weekend in Magnolia. We were going to the river and drink beer and Katrina happened that weekend."

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Business
12:00 am
Wed August 20, 2014

Ex-Microsoft CEO Ballmer Steps Down From Company's Board

Steve Ballmer, the new owner of the Los Angeles Clippers, is stepping down from Microsoft's board. Ballmer, who recently resigned as Microsoft's CEO, is the largest individual shareholder of the company.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:06 am

Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, 58, has resigned from the company's board citing other time consuming commitments including his new ownership of the Los Angeles Clippers.

Tuesday's announcement closes a chapter in Ballmer's 34 years with the software giant. He remains the largest individual shareholder in the company.

Ballmer spent $2 billion of his roughly $20 billion fortune on the Clippers purchase, which a judge confirmed last week.

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The Two-Way
5:00 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Ferguson Update: Holder Writes Op-Ed; City Calls For Nighttime Calm

Protesters walk on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Mo., on Tuesday. Protests have been going on for more than a week after the police shooting of unarmed teen Michael Brown.
Michael B. Thomas AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:26 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder has made a pledge to Ferguson, Mo., where 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer on Aug. 9.

"Our investigation into this matter will be full, it will be fair, and it will be independent," he wrote in an op-ed for the St. Louis Dispatch. He added, "Long after the events of Aug. 9 have receded from the headlines, the Justice Department will continue to stand with this community."

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The Two-Way
4:23 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Gov. Perry Gets Booked At Texas Courthouse After Indictment

Texas Gov. Rick Perry arrives at the Blackwell Thurman Criminal Justice Center on Tuesday in Austin, Texas.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:03 pm

Texas Gov. Rick Perry went to a courthouse to be booked after being indicted by an Austin grand jury on Friday for alleged abuse of power.

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The Two-Way
4:22 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Torrential Rain Swamps Phoenix, Strands Drivers

Flash-flood waters from the overrun Skunk Creek flood I-10 in northwestern Phoenix. Flooding from heavy rain forced authorities to close several major roads, including a portion of Interstate 17.
Matt York AP

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 4:51 pm

Monsoonal rainfall caused massive flash flooding in Phoenix on Tuesday, turning roads into raging torrents and stranding residents and drivers.

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The Two-Way
3:33 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Man With A Knife Fatally Shot By Police In St. Louis, Officials Say

People raise their arms while chanting, "Hands up. Don't shoot," near where St. Louis police say officers shot and killed a 23-year-old man who was wielding a knife and refused to drop it on Tuesday.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:07 pm

St. Louis Metropolitan Police shot and killed a man about 4 miles from the suburb of Ferguson, where people have been rallying since the fatal shooting of Michael Brown by a police officer on Aug. 9.

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News
3:29 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Amid The Chaos In Ferguson, Another Police Shooting

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
3:28 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Doctors Without Borders: What We Need To Contain Ebola

Dr. Joanne Liu (left), international president of Doctors Without Borders poses with a member of the MSF medical team at the organization's Ebola treatment center in Kailahun, Sierra Leone.
P.K. Lee Courtesy of Doctors Without Border

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:51 pm

With the continuous uptick in the number of cases and deaths in the current Ebola outbreak, the few agencies that are on ground are stretched thin.

That includes Doctors Without Borders, also known as MSF. It's one of the main health care providers in West Africa, where there are more than 2,000 cases of Ebola and 1,200 deaths. Even with roughly 1,000 volunteers spread among the three Ebola-stricken countries, the agency says that still isn't enough.

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Middle East
3:27 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Blocked At The Border, Gaza Man's Hopes Of Escape Fade

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This Week's Must Read
3:22 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

'This Fight Begins In The Heart': Reading James Baldwin As Ferguson Seethes

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 3:55 pm

It is early August. A black man is shot by a white policeman. And the effect on the community is of "a lit match in a tin of gasoline."

No, this is not Ferguson, Mo. This was Harlem in August 1943, a period that James Baldwin writes about in the essay that gives its title to his seminal collection, Notes of a Native Son.

The story begins with the death of Baldwin's father, a proud, severe preacher who viewed all white people with suspicion, even the kindly schoolteacher who encouraged his son's writings.

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Goats and Soda
3:17 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Ebola In The Skies? How The Virus Made It To West Africa

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:37 pm

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the most explosive in history. One reason the virus spread so fast is that West Africa was blindsided. Ebola had never erupted in people anywhere close to West Africa before.

The type of Ebola causing the outbreak — called Zaire — is the deadliest strain. Until this year, it had been seen only in Central Africa, about 2,500 miles away. That's about the distance between Boston and San Francisco.

So how did it spread across this giant swath of land without anybody noticing?

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Ferguson Teachers Use Day Off As Opportunity For A Civics Lesson

Teachers with the Jennings School District pick up trash Tuesday on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Mo., the scene of nightly police clashes. Jennings and the neighboring Ferguson school district have canceled class due to ongoing unrest.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:30 pm

Chaos and unrest overnight have kept the National Guard in the suburban town of Ferguson, Mo., for a second day, and the local school district has canceled classes for the week. After two nights of violent clashes this week, neighboring Jennings School District is out of class, too.

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The Salt
2:21 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Specialty Food And Agriculture Startups Are Ripening In Greece

Ilias Smirlis (left) runs a small family farm in Kalamata, Greece. Before he met entrepreneur Sotiris Lymperopoulos, who runs the food service Radiki, he struggled to sell his produce outside Athens. "The demand for excellent products will always exist," Smirlis says. "The challenge is to find a market."
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Most mornings, Sotiris Lymperopoulos walks the craggy shoreline of the western Peloponnese, foraging for salty wild greens.

In his straw hat and shorts, snipping wild chicory, garlic and sea asparagus with a kitchen knife, he hardly looks like a poster boy for Greece's nascent startup culture. But the 35-year-old Athenian, who trained as an economist, found a viable niche in the country's post-crisis economy.

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Latin America
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Once An Object Of Reverence, Brazilian Soccer's A Punchline

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

It's been over a month since the World Cup ended in Brazil, but the shame of the country's blowout loss remains. Once, Brazilians were welcomed in other countries with talk of Brazil's soccer dominance; now, everyone merely speaks of their historic defeat against Germany.

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Europe
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Civilian Convoy Comes Under Attack In Ukraine

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 3:08 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

A Milestone Marked In Disposal Of Syria's Chemical Weapons

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Race
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Study Shows Sharp Racial Divide In Reaction To Ferguson

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 8:06 pm

A recent study by the Pew Research Center finds that there are stark racial divisions in reactions to the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Audie Cornish talks to Carroll Doherty, director of political research at Pew, for more.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A Closer Look At Sexual Assaults On Campus
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

As Kids Head To Campus, Parents Broach The Subject Of Sexual Assault

Onaja Waki (left) is about to start college in California, but she and her mother, Oneida Cordova, have been talking openly for years about the dangers of sexual assault.
Teresa Chin Youth Radio

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 3:16 pm

Rachel Swinehart has commandeered her family's living room in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. It's filled with large plastic tubs containing stuff like pink bedding and a coffee maker.

Rachel, 18, is about to head off to Shenandoah College, a small arts school in Virginia, where she'll study harp performance. In many ways, organizing her stuff is the easy part. Talking about the risks of college life — that's a bit harder.

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