Shots - Health Blog
2:15 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

Controversy Over Stem-Cell Research Keeps Charities On Sidelines

There's a funding tempest in a cell culture.
Andrei Tchernov iStockphoto.com

The Susan G. Komen for the Cure foundation has been in the news because of its clash with Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

But another aspect of Komen's activities hasn't received much attention: Komen's position on research using human embryonic stem cells.

Despite raising millions of dollars for breast cancer research, Komen hasn't funded any of this work, prompting questions about whether that decision is rooted in politics.

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Barbara Bradley Hagerty is the religion correspondent for NPR, reporting on the intersection of faith and politics, law, science and culture. Her New York Times best-selling book, "Fingerprints of God: The Search for the Science of Spirituality," was published by Riverhead/Penguin Group in May 2009. Among others, Barb has received the American Women in Radio and Television Award, the Headliners Award and the Religion Newswriters Association Award for radio reporting.

The Salt
1:58 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

To Hold The Salt, It's Time To Hold The Bread

Sodium content can vary widely even between two sandwiches that look the same.
CDC

It's no secret that some of the tastiest snacks around — potato chips, french fries, and processed deli meats — are terrific vehicles for salt. Without salt, they'd be bland, too starchy, or just plain dull.

But would you guess that the white bread on your turkey sandwich could be delivering as much or more than the turkey — up to 400 mg of sodium, or about one-third of the daily recommended limit for 6 of every 10 adults?

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Religion
1:42 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

A Pulpit For The Masses: YouTube, Christians Click

Created by liberal Christians, the YouTube video "Tea Party Jesus" is a spoof on conservative politics.
AmericanValuesNet/YouTube

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 4:26 pm

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NPR correspondent Alix Spiegel works on the Science desk and covers psychology.

Arriving at NPR in 2003, much of Spiegel's reporting has been on emotion mental health. She has reported on everything from the psychological impact of killing another person, to the emotional devastation of Katrina, to psycho-therapeutic approaches to transgender children.

Education
1:22 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

Meaningless In Missouri? Not In Santorum's View

A sign supporting former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum outside the O'Fallon, Mo., city hall on Tuesday, as the state's Republican primary was under way.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Wed February 8, 2012 9:31 am

For an election that shouldn't matter on paper, Missouri's primary on Tuesday may carry a lot of weight.

The state's Republican electorate tends to be both populist and conservative. That could give former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, who has campaigned in Missouri the most — and the most recently — among GOP presidential candidates, the chance for a strong showing.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:16 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

A Fresh Look At Antidepressants Finds Low Risk Of Youth Suicide

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 3:35 pm

In 2004, after an extensive review, the Food and Drug Administration issued a strong warning to doctors who prescribed antidepressants to teens and children.

Antidepressants, the FDA said, appeared to increase suicide among kids and teens. Doctors needed to be careful. The FDA even mandated that a "black-box warning," the strongest type, be placed on antidepressant packaging.

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Latin America
1:11 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

Can Vaccines Break Cholera's Deadly Hold On Haiti?

Haitians suffering from cholera symptoms rest at the treatment center in Mirebalais, a dusty town north of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, last June. The cholera epidemic in Haiti began in Mirebalais, believed to be the result of overflowing bathrooms from a nearby U.N. compound.
Eduardo Verdugo AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:05 am

The cholera outbreak in Haiti is currently the worst ongoing episode in the world.

Over the past 15 months, it has sickened more than half a million people and killed roughly 7,000. The bacteria has now spread throughout the Caribbean island, and medical experts say it will be around for years to come.

Partners in Health, a Boston-based nonprofit, is planning to launch an unprecedented cholera vaccination campaign to try to curb the outbreak — but it faces many challenges, including a shortage of the vaccine.

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It's All Politics
1:06 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

Why Missouri Voters Have The 'Beauty Contest' Blues

There's no waiting in line at O'Fallon City Hall. A half-dozen election volunteers have been eagerly hoping that more people will turn up for Tuesday's Republican primary.

After five hours, they've seen a grand total of 33 voters. Normally, the City Hall precinct gets about 250 people to turn out for a primary.

"We haven't had many," says Vince Scully, a retired printer and election official. As for a late rush in the evening, he says, "We won't have that today."

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From Our Listeners
1:00 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

Letters: All About Cheese

Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish read emails from listeners responding to a story about a group that's trying to reduce the amount of cheese Americans consume.

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