KUER 90.1 | NPR Utah

Latest News

iStock

Trump Health Insurance Plan Could Offer Cheaper Coverage But 'Erode' The ACA

Today is the deadline for public comment on a federal proposal allowing health insurers to offer new short-term insurance plans. Some say it’s another step towards dismantling the Affordable Care Act.

Read More

When someone calls 911, we don’t really think about the person who answers. But the person on the other end carries a heavy burden. Listen to this week's More To Say.

Mark Zuckerberg is on the hot seat this week. He’s testifying in front of Congress about Facebook user profiles being mined without permission.  

The data breach prompted a “Delete Facebook” movement that hasn’t really gained any traction.

That’s especially true in the Native American community, where Facebook is much more than sharing cat videos or keeping in touch with friends and family.  

States like Colorado and Wyoming require that new oil and gas wells be built at least 500 feet away from existing homes. But new research shows that might not be far enough away to protect people’s health.

Erik Neumann / KUER

Ballot initiative organizers in Utah have just a week left to collect signatures to try to get their proposals in next November’s election. Some of the proposed initiatives are close. Others have a long way to go.

Judy Fahys/KUER News

What we know about air pollution and health has roots in the mountain valleys of Utah. Winter smog episodes here are legendary.

There are a lot of regrets coming out of Silicon Valley these days as the dark side of the tech revolution becomes increasingly apparent, from smartphone addiction to the big scandal involving the misuse of personal information from some 87 million Facebook users.

Joan Marcus

The hit Broadway musical “Hamilton” opens this week at Salt Lake City’s Eccles Theater. Tickets were snatched up within hours of going on sale in February, but if you didn’t get one, there’s still hope. The musical is selling 40 tickets to each performance through a digital lottery beginning Monday.

Kelsie Moore / KUER

Mitt and Ann Romney sat down in front of about 600 supporters and state delegates Thursday evening for a “living room” style chat, moderated by former Utah broadcaster Ruth Todd.

OFFICE OF UTAH GOVERNOR GARY HERBERT

Wildfire season is coming up. And new restrictions on fireworks might help reduce the ones’ that are man-made.

istock

Utah State University announced changes today following a sexual misconduct investigation into the school’s piano department. Speaking at a press conference on Friday, USU President Noelle Cockett did not shy away from taking responsibility.

Animal rights advocates are asking the federal government to protect certain wild horses as an endangered species. It’s not their first attempt, but this time it’s a specific herd.

Pages

RadioWest

Jellyfish and the Art of Growing a Backbone

The science writer Juli Berwald loves jellyfish. She loved studying them and writing about them. She says they helped her grow more backbone and personal confidence.

Podcast: More To Say

KUER

This week on More to Say we’re putting out an episode we made back in November, about a police dispatcher. When someone calls 911, we don’t really think about the person who answers. But the person on the other end carries a heavy burden. When something goes wrong, or someone dies, the dispatcher has to live with it.

Original story: http://kuer.org/post/emergency-dispatchers-mental-toll-high-stress-job#stream/0

Click here for more from "More To Say"

Trivia Night with the Young Friends of KUER

Join us at Squatters for our second trivia night - happening May 11 at 5:30 p.m.

This Week's News In Your Inbox

Get the latest in news, events and station happenings every Thursday with KUER's newsletter.

NPR News

The man suspected of killing at least 10 people on Monday by plowing a rented white van down crowded Toronto sidewalks appeared in court Tuesday morning and has been charged with 10 counts of murder and 13 counts of attempted murder.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that foreign corporations cannot be sued for damages in U.S. courts for aiding in terrorist attacks or other human rights violations. The vote was 5-to-4.

Writing for the conservative majority, Justice Anthony Kennedy said that "courts are not well suited to make the required policy judgments implicated by corporate liability in cases like this one."

Rather, the political branches, Congress and the executive, should deal with these issues, he said.

Updated at 1:12 p.m. ET

Organizers of a newsroom union at the Chicago Tribune have informed its publisher that colleagues have already given such overwhelming formal support for their effort that the paper's parent company should recognize the guild voluntarily and start to negotiate a contract.

The organizers gave the Tribune's parent company, Tronc, a day to make a decision.

Updated at 1:40 pm ET

President Trump is celebrating America's oldest alliance with French President Emmanuel Macron. But even as they prepare for a lavish state dinner, the two leaders could not paper over stark differences on issues such as trade and the Iran nuclear deal.

Democratic lawmakers are calling for a subpoena to force the U.S. Census Bureau and Commerce Department to release internal documents about the decision to add a controversial citizenship question to forms for the upcoming national headcount.

The request comes two weeks before a congressional oversight hearing on the 2020 census.

More News