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Judy Fahys / KUER News

National Monuments: Lots of Talk, But Many Still Feel Unheard

Albert Holiday was standing at a remote junction in Utah’s red rock desert. He was part of a group of Utah Dine Bikeyah members chanting in Navajo at passing cars: “Where is Zinke?’ and ‘Go Bears Ears!” They were hoping to catch the attention of U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke on his way to another meeting.

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Erik Neumann

On Friday, Jon Huntsman Sr. published a two-page ad in Salt Lake City’s biggest newspapers highlighting achievements of the Huntsman Cancer Institute and distancing it from the University of Utah.

Julia Ritchey, KUER

Congressman Chris Stewart’s town hall in Central Utah on Friday brought out more supporters than detractors, but he still faced several tough questions about the GOP’s plan to repeal Obamacare.

Nicole Nixon

After nearly two years, construction on Regent Street in downtown Salt Lake City is complete.

Julia Ritchey, KUER

Republican Congressman Chris Stewart is holding a town hall tonight at Richfield High School in Sevier County.

File Photo

As Utah’s population grows, state and business leaders are trying to plan carefully. Only so much undeveloped land remains, and they say they want to build strategically.

 


As the fallout continues from President Trump's decision to fire FBI Director James Comey, Utah Sen. Mike Lee has weighed in with an unusual suggestion to replace him.

Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has ended its involvement with the Varsity and Venture programs of the Boy Scouts of America. This affects boys ages 14-18 in the church, which makes up about 130,000 of the 2.3 million registered boy scouts in the country.

U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke says he’s optimistic about solutions for the state’s national monument controversies after talking with “multitudes” of people during his fourth and final day in Utah.  

Julia Ritchey, KUER

Utah’s top tourism official says at a time when the number of people visiting national parks is skyrocketing, the Trump administration and Congress should step up their funding of the National Park Service.

Nancy Green / KUED

U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke stopped by Dugout Ranch near Canyonlands National Park, where researchers are studying climate change.

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Texas is seeking permission from the federal government for the return of federal family planning money it lost four years ago. It lost those Medicaid funds after it excluded Planned Parenthood and other clinics affiliated with abortion providers from the state's women's health program.

The revised Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act will leave 23 million more people uninsured in 2026 than if that act, also known as Obamacare, were to remain in place. The GOP bill would also reduce the deficit by $119 billion over 10 years.

British police have identified Salman Abedi, 22, as the bomber behind the attack on an Ariana Grande concert Monday in Manchester, England. Abedi died in the bombing, which claimed the lives of at least 22 victims and injured dozens more — many of whom were children.

After making the need for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border a central campaign theme, President Trump has asked Congress for just $1.6 billion to start building 74 miles of barriers. Texas alone shares more than 1,200 miles of border with Mexico.

If Congress approves the current request, 14 miles of old fencing in the San Diego sector would be replaced, and 60 miles of new structures would be built in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas — the region with the heaviest illegal traffic.

Vermont Governor Phil Scott, a Republican, said on Wednesday he was vetoing a bill to legalize marijuana, and sending it back to the legislature for changes.

"We must get this right," Scott said in prepared remarks at a press conference today. "I think we need to move a little bit slower."

Though he said he views the issue "through a libertarian lens," Scott vetoed the bill due to concerns about detecting and penalizing impaired drivers, protecting children, and the role and makeup of a Marijuana Regulatory Commission.

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