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One Mental Health Expert Wants To Remind Mormons That Bishops Are Not Therapists

President Trump’s former staff secretary Rob Porter has been all over the news since he resigned from the White House last week. Porter, a Mormon, left his position after his two ex-wives accused him of being physically abusive. It has since been revealed that both of these women confided in their Mormon bishops about the abuse and were encouraged to remain in their relationships.

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We're past the halfway mark, and a lot happened during week 4 of the Utah Legislative Session. Keep up with what's happening on Capitol Hill by listening to KUER's 45 Days.

Austen Diamond / KUER

The Republican lawmaker who wrote Utah’s current surrogacy law tried to have it repealed this week.

Judy Fahys/KUER News

Utah homeowners and industry have been looking for a way for years to make rooftop solar costs more predictable. Lawmakers are advancing legislation that provides stability that balances the impacts of a rapidly growing industry.

David Vogel Photography & Dave Brewer/Photo Collective Studios

Salt Lake City’s summer Twilight Concert Series isn’t going away after all. The city announced last Fall that the yearly event would be canceled but now, with the help of a new business partner and more manageable venue, it’s back.

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Utah lawmakers are once again weighing whether to eliminate the state's sales tax on food items — and the author behind the legislation is urging his colleagues to get on board. 

KUER

Doing away with the death penalty is usually thought of as a liberal cause, and the arguments are often about the morality of executing someone, or wrongful convictions. But now some conservatives are lining up against capital punishment too — for reasons of their own. KUER’s Whittney Evans joins Doug Fabrizio to talk about why.

Original Story: http://kuer.org/post/death-penalty-repeal-groups-including-republicans-say-utah-moving-closer-ending-executions

Screenshot / Utah House of Representatives

A former Utah lawmaker who abruptly resigned this week reportedly paid an escort for sex as recently as last year, according to a British tabloid

Rob Porter, a top White House aide and former chief of staff to Sen. Orrin Hatch, has resigned after allegations of spousal abuse.

Gov. Herbert's Office

Utah has Olympic fever again. Business and political leaders on Utah’s Olympic/Paralympic Exploratory Committee unanimously agreed Wednesday to move forward with a bid to host the Winter Games again.

Salt Lake City School Distirct

An elementary school in Salt Lake City previously named after former President Andrew Jackson will now be honoring NASA’s first black female engineer, Mary Jackson.

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The non-profit research firm Utah Foundation released numbers today that break down education spending in the state. While the information isn’t entirely new, it’s an attempt to give the public and policymakers a clearer picture.

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RadioWest

The Seeds of Life

Where do babies come from? It took us a surprisingly long time to figure it out. Science writer Edward Dolnick joins us Friday to tell the story of theories, searching and scientific discovery.

Podcast: 45 Days

KUER

This week lawmakers paused to honor the 17 lives lost in a school shooting in Parkland, Fla. But the latest school violence is unlikely to persuade Republican leaders to propose any big changes to gun laws this session. Meanwhile, a committee finally approved something close to a resolution acknowledging climate change without actually using the phrase "climate change." We also talk about some air quality bills and medical marijuana. Rep. Steve Eliason joins us on 'Better Know A Lawmaker' and explains how he's tackling Utah's youth suicide problem. 

Click here for more from "45 Days"

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Podcast: More To Say

When Your Senator Blocks You

Feb 15, 2018
KUER

These days it’s perfectly normal for lawmakers at the state and federal level to be on Twitter. President Trump, of course, tweets frequently. And Utah’s representatives are no different. Local lawmakers Todd Weiler and Jim Dabakis are both Twitter users with lots of followers. But what does it mean when a politician blocks someone on social media? Should that even be allowed to happen? KUER’s Julia Ritchey joins Doug Fabrizio to talk about it.

Original story: http://kuer.org/post/when-online-civility-tested-lawmakers-hit-block-button

Click here for more from "More To Say"

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Black Panther pounced on the weekend box office, breaking cultural barriers and earning the highest debut ever for a February film, with an estimated three-day domestic gross of $192 million, said Disney, Marvel's parent company.

The opening was the fifth highest-earning of any film, according to Disney. The only other movies that have brought in more are Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Jurassic World and The Avengers, according to The Associated Press.

President Trump spent the weekend at his Mar-a-Lago resort tweeting about the Russia investigation after a federal grand jury on Friday indicted 13 Russians and three Russian companies in connection with what prosecutors describe as a covert Russian campaign to help Trump win the presidency.

All 65 people aboard an Aseman Airlines plane were feared dead when it slammed into Mount Dena in central Iran Sunday during a bout of bad weather, authorities told the Iranian state broadcaster.

But there was so much fog and rain that rescue crews had been unable to reach the crash site via helicopter and were hoping a drone could aid in their search, reports IRNA, the country's official news agency.

The Trump administration is proposing to dramatically cut funding for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a move critics say is an ongoing assault on the 7-year-old agency.

The bureau was championed by Elizabeth Warren and other Democrats and created in the wake of the financial crisis to protect Americans from getting ripped off by financial firms.

Tommy Rock has had three graduations — high school, college and graduate school. And no one from his family was there — no one to cheer for him, no one to take his picture. And when he came home to Monument Valley, few really cared.

"I didn't get no congratulations or nothing," Rock said. "It was like 'Oh you think you're better than us?' I was like, 'Wow, OK.' "

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