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Julia Ritchey, KUER

Hatch Still Coy On Retirement Plans As Romney Rumors Swirl

Sen. Orrin Hatch says he's still weighing a 2018 re-election run.

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NPR Jazz

Salt Lake City, UT – Airs Saturday morning

Wednesday, June 30, 2004 – Doug talks with local book gurus from Ken Sanders Rare Books, King's English Bookstore and Sam Weller's Zion Bookstore about what to read this summer.

Thursday, July 1: TBD – Show TBD

Tuesday, June 29 –

Monday, June 28 – Medicare reform has changed the way we look at the costs of aging. Take a look at what some see as a more humane way to age and die, the hospice.

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RadioWest

If Our Bodies Could Talk

We all want to make good health decisions, but every day a study comes out that seems to change the game. Doctor-turned-journalist James Hamblin joins us Tuesday to search for the signal in the noise.

Early Bird Specials Until Sept. 18th!

Donate to KUER before our Fall Fund Drive to receive early bird pricing.

New Podcast

Episode 1: Brother

9 hours ago
KUER

KUER partners with Nurture the Creative Mind to put recorders and microphones in the hands of teenagers.  They choose who they want to talk to, and what they want to talk about.  In this episode, Ryan Gimbel sits down with fellow student Piper Deamer to talk about Piper’s brother.

Click here for more from "Hear Me Now"

Snap Judgment, Live in SLC on October 27th

Get tickets to the live performance, including a VIP reception

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Roughly half of Florida's homes and businesses remained without electricity on Tuesday, two days after Hurricane Irma plowed through the state. A lot of the business recovery efforts there will depend on how quickly power can be restored.

On her way to work Tuesday morning, Carol McDaniel, vice president of human resources for the Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg, made her way through darkened neighborhoods.

When the worst of Irma's fury had passed, Gene McAvoy hit the road to inspect citrus groves and vegetable fields. McAvoy is a specialist on vegetable farming at the University of Florida's extension office in the town of LaBelle, in the middle of one of the country's biggest concentrations of vegetable and citrus farms.

It took a direct hit from the storm. "The eyewall came right over our main production area," McAvoy says.

Early leaks of new designs had stirred anticipation for Apple's new smartphone — and on Tuesday Apple delivered on all the predictions with a $699 iPhone 8 and a $999 special-edition iPhone X (as in "ten"). The 10th-anniversary iPhone is the biggest redesign in years, with an all-screen front that eliminates the home button and can use facial recognition to unlock the display.

But it was the new Apple Watch that got Wall Street — and many tech observers — excited on launch day.

With communications still sketchy on many Caribbean islands smashed by Hurricane Irma, it requires a view from space to take in the magnitude of the destruction from one of the most powerful storms to form in the Atlantic.

Image after image, stretching from Barbuda in the east to Turks and Caicos in the west, shows devastation on a scale that will certainly take years and billions of dollars to rebuild and surely will never be forgotten by those who endured it firsthand. Nearly three dozen people died throughout the Caribbean.

Now that Hurricane Irma has left Florida, gasoline supplies are slowly coming back into the state. But thousands of gas stations remain closed anyway.

That's because, with electricity out throughout the peninsula, even stations that have access to gas have no way to get it into people's vehicles.

"Power is the issue. Most of these gas stations don't have backup generation that can allow the pumps to work," says John Kilduff, founding partner of Again Capital, an energy investment firm.

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